An evidence-based veterinary medicine bibliography. Curated by Susanne Whitaker (Cornell University Library; retired) from 2007-2012 & Dr. Stuart W. Turner from 2012 to present. If you’re an EBVMA member and wish to help maintain this page, please let us know.


Authors: Type:

2017

  • [DOI] Lessard, Lysanne, Wojtek Michalowski, Michael Fung-Kee-Fung, Lori Jones, and Agnes Grudniewicz. “Architectural frameworks: defining the structures for implementing learning health systems..” Implement sci 12.1 (2017): 78. [Bibtex]
    @article{Lessard:2017aa,
    Abstract = {BACKGROUND: The vision of transforming health systems into learning health systems (LHSs) that rapidly and continuously transform knowledge into improved health outcomes at lower cost is generating increased interest in government agencies, health organizations, and health research communities. While existing initiatives demonstrate that different approaches can succeed in making the LHS vision a reality, they are too varied in their goals, focus, and scale to be reproduced without undue effort. Indeed, the structures necessary to effectively design and implement LHSs on a larger scale are lacking. In this paper, we propose the use of architectural frameworks to develop LHSs that adhere to a recognized vision while being adapted to their specific organizational context. Architectural frameworks are high-level descriptions of an organization as a system; they capture the structure of its main components at varied levels, the interrelationships among these components, and the principles that guide their evolution. Because these frameworks support the analysis of LHSs and allow their outcomes to be simulated, they act as pre-implementation decision-support tools that identify potential barriers and enablers of system development. They thus increase the chances of successful LHS deployment. DISCUSSION: We present an architectural framework for LHSs that incorporates five dimensions-goals, scientific, social, technical, and ethical-commonly found in the LHS literature. The proposed architectural framework is comprised of six decision layers that model these dimensions. The performance layer models goals, the scientific layer models the scientific dimension, the organizational layer models the social dimension, the data layer and information technology layer model the technical dimension, and the ethics and security layer models the ethical dimension. We describe the types of decisions that must be made within each layer and identify methods to support decision-making. CONCLUSION: In this paper, we outline a high-level architectural framework grounded in conceptual and empirical LHS literature. Applying this architectural framework can guide the development and implementation of new LHSs and the evolution of existing ones, as it allows for clear and critical understanding of the types of decisions that underlie LHS operations. Further research is required to assess and refine its generalizability and methods.},
    Address = {Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, 55 Ave. Laurier E, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada. Lessard@telfer.uottawa.ca.},
    Address1 = {Institut du Savoir Montfort (ISM), 202-745A Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON, K1K 0T1, Canada. Lessard@telfer.uottawa.ca.},
    Address2 = {Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, 55 Ave. Laurier E, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada.},
    Address3 = {Institut du Savoir Montfort (ISM), 202-745A Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON, K1K 0T1, Canada.},
    Address4 = {Departments of Obstetrics-Gynecology and Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8M5, Canada.},
    Address5 = {The Ottawa Hospital-General Campus, University of Ottawa/Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8L6, Canada.},
    Address6 = {University of Ottawa, 55 Ave. Laurier E, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada.},
    Address7 = {Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, 55 Ave. Laurier E, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5, Canada.},
    Auid = {ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3013-0044},
    Author = {Lessard, Lysanne and Michalowski, Wojtek and Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael and Jones, Lori and Grudniewicz, Agnes},
    Crdt = {2017/06/25 06:00},
    Da = {20170624},
    Date = {2017 Jun 23},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dep = {20170623},
    Doi = {10.1186/s13012-017-0607-7},
    Edat = {2017/06/25 06:00},
    Issn = {1748-5908 (Electronic); 1748-5908 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101258411},
    Journal = {Implement Sci},
    Jt = {Implementation science : IS},
    Keywords = {Architectural framework; Decision-support tools; Learning health system; Pre-implementation},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1186/s13012-017-0607-7 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170714},
    Mhda = {2017/06/25 06:00},
    Month = {Jun},
    Number = {1},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {78},
    Phst = {2017/01/15 {$[$}received{$]$}; 2017/06/05 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pii = {10.1186/s13012-017-0607-7},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmc = {PMC5481948},
    Pmid = {28645319},
    Pst = {epublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {Implement Sci. 2017 Jun 23;12(1):78. doi: 10.1186/s13012-017-0607-7. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Architectural frameworks: defining the structures for implementing learning health systems.},
    Volume = {12},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13012-017-0607-7}}
  • [DOI] Friedman, C. P., J. C. Rubin, and K. J. Sullivan. “Toward an information infrastructure for global health improvement..” Yearb med inform 26.1 (2017): 16-23. [Bibtex]
    @article{Friedman:2017aa,
    Abstract = {Profound global challenges to individual and population health, alongside the opportunities to benefit from digital technology, have spawned the concept of the Learning Health System. Learning Health Systems (LHSs)--which can function at organizational, network, regional, and national levels of scale--have the capability of continuous data-driven self-study that promotes change and improvement. The LHS concept, which originated in the U.S. in 2007, is rapidly gaining attention around the world. LHSs require, but also transcend, the secondary use of health data. This paper describes the key features of LHSs, argues that effective and sustainable LHSs must be supported by infrastructures that allow them to function with economies of scale and scope, and describes the services that such infrastructures must provide. While it is relatively straightforward to describe LHSs, achieving them at the high level of capability necessary to promote significant health benefits will require advancements in science and engineering, engaging the field of informatics among a wider range of disciplines. It also follows from this vision that LHSs cannot be built from an imposed blueprint; LHSs will more likely evolve from efforts at smaller scales that compose into larger systems.},
    Author = {Friedman, C P and Rubin, J C and Sullivan, K J},
    Coi = {Disclosure The authors report no conflicts of interest in this work.},
    Copyright = {Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.},
    Crdt = {2017/05/09 06:00},
    Da = {20170508},
    Date = {2017 Aug},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dep = {20170911},
    Doi = {10.15265/IY-2017-004},
    Edat = {2017/05/10 06:00},
    Issn = {2364-0502 (Electronic); 0943-4747 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9312666},
    Journal = {Yearb Med Inform},
    Jt = {Yearbook of medical informatics},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.15265/IY-2017-004 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20171002},
    Mhda = {2017/05/10 06:00},
    Month = {Aug},
    Number = {1},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {16--23},
    Pii = {me2017-004},
    Pl = {Germany},
    Pmid = {28480469},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {Yearb Med Inform. 2017 Aug;26(1):16-23. doi: 10.15265/IY-2017-004. Epub 2017 Sep 11. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Toward an Information Infrastructure for Global Health Improvement.},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.15265/IY-2017-004}}
  • [DOI] Richesson, Rachel L., Beverly B. Green, Reesa Laws, Jon Puro, Michael G. Kahn, Alan Bauck, Michelle Smerek, Erik G. Van Eaton, Meredith Zozus, Ed W. Hammond, Kari A. Stephens, and Greg E. Simon. “Pragmatic (trial) informatics: a perspective from the nih health care systems research collaboratory..” J am med inform assoc 24.5 (2017): 996-1001. [Bibtex]
    @article{Richesson:2017aa,
    Abstract = {Pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) are research investigations embedded in health care settings designed to increase the efficiency of research and its relevance to clinical practice. The Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory, initiated by the National Institutes of Health Common Fund in 2010, is a pioneering cooperative aimed at identifying and overcoming operational challenges to pragmatic research. Drawing from our experience, we present 4 broad categories of informatics-related challenges: (1) using clinical data for research, (2) integrating data from heterogeneous systems, (3) using electronic health records to support intervention delivery or health system change, and (4) assessing and improving data capture to define study populations and outcomes. These challenges impact the validity, reliability, and integrity of PCTs. Achieving the full potential of PCTs and a learning health system will require meaningful partnerships between health system leadership and operations, and federally driven standards and policies to ensure that future electronic health record systems have the flexibility to support research.},
    Address = {Division of Clinical Systems and Analytics, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, NC, USA.},
    Address1 = {Duke Center for Health Informatics, Durham, NC, USA.},
    Address10 = {Duke Center for Health Informatics, Durham, NC, USA.},
    Address11 = {Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.},
    Address12 = {Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.},
    Address2 = {Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.},
    Address3 = {Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, OR, USA.},
    Address4 = {OCHIN Inc, Portland, OR, USA.},
    Address5 = {Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USA.},
    Address6 = {Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, OR, USA.},
    Address7 = {Clinical Research Informatics, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, USA.},
    Address8 = {Department of Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.},
    Address9 = {University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA.},
    Author = {Richesson, Rachel L and Green, Beverly B and Laws, Reesa and Puro, Jon and Kahn, Michael G and Bauck, Alan and Smerek, Michelle and Van Eaton, Erik G and Zozus, Meredith and Hammond, W Ed and Stephens, Kari A and Simon, Greg E},
    Copyright = {(c) The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.},
    Crdt = {2017/03/25 06:00},
    Da = {20170324},
    Date = {2017 Sep 01},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Doi = {10.1093/jamia/ocx016},
    Edat = {2017/03/25 06:00},
    Issn = {1527-974X (Electronic); 1067-5027 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9430800},
    Journal = {J Am Med Inform Assoc},
    Jt = {Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA},
    Keywords = {*National Institutes of Health; *clinical informatics; *demonstration project; *electronic health records; *pragmatic clinical trial},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1093/jamia/ocx016 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170816},
    Mhda = {2017/03/25 06:00},
    Month = {Sep},
    Number = {5},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {996--1001},
    Phst = {2016/11/20 {$[$}received{$]$}; 2017/02/14 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pii = {3069877},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {28340241},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2017 Sep 1;24(5):996-1001. doi: 10.1093/jamia/ocx016. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Pragmatic (trial) informatics: a perspective from the NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory.},
    Volume = {24},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jamia/ocx016}}
  • [DOI] Bindman, Andrew B.. “A shared responsibility for developing a learning health system..” J nurs care qual 32.2 (2017): 95-98. [Bibtex]
    @article{Bindman:2017aa,
    Address = {Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology \& Biostatistics, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco. Dr Bindman is the former Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, Maryland.},
    Author = {Bindman, Andrew B},
    Crdt = {2017/02/23 06:00},
    Da = {20170222},
    Date = {2017 Apr/Jun},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Doi = {10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000255},
    Edat = {2017/02/23 06:00},
    Issn = {1550-5065 (Electronic); 1057-3631 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9200672},
    Journal = {J Nurs Care Qual},
    Jt = {Journal of nursing care quality},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000255 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170222},
    Mhda = {2017/02/23 06:00},
    Month = {Apr/Jun},
    Number = {2},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {95--98},
    Pii = {00001786-201704000-00001},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {28225531},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {J Nurs Care Qual. 2017 Apr/Jun;32(2):95-98. doi: 10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000255. },
    Status = {In-Data-Review},
    Title = {A Shared Responsibility for Developing a Learning Health System.},
    Volume = {32},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCQ.0000000000000255}}
  • [DOI] Stucki, Gerold and Jerome Bickenbach. “Functioning information in the learning health system..” Eur j phys rehabil med 53.1 (2017): 139-143. [Bibtex]
    @article{Stucki:2017aa,
    Abstract = {In this methodological note on applying the ICF in rehabilitation, we introduce functioning information as fundamental for the "learning health system" and the continuous improvement of the health system's response to people's functioning needs by means of the provision of rehabilitation. A learning health system for rehabilitation operates at the micro-level of the individual patient, meso-level of operational management, and the macro-level of policy that guides rehabilitation programming. All three levels rely on the capacity of the informational system of the health system for standardized documentation and coding of functioning information, and the development of national rehabilitation quality management systems. This methodological note describes how functioning information is used for the continuous improvement of functioning outcomes in a learning health system across these three levels.},
    Address = {Department of Health Sciences and Health Policy, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Lucerne, Lucerne, Switzerland - gerold.stucki@paraplegie.ch.},
    Address1 = {Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPF), Nottwil, Switzerland - gerold.stucki@paraplegie.ch.},
    Address2 = {ICF Research Branch, in Cooperation Partner with the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications in Germany (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland - gerold.stucki@paraplegie.ch.},
    Address3 = {Department of Health Sciences and Health Policy, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Lucerne, Lucerne, Switzerland.},
    Address4 = {Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPF), Nottwil, Switzerland.},
    Address5 = {ICF Research Branch, in Cooperation Partner with the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications in Germany (at DIMDI), Nottwil, Switzerland.},
    Author = {Stucki, Gerold and Bickenbach, Jerome},
    Crdt = {2017/02/02 06:00},
    Da = {20170201},
    Date = {2017 Feb},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dep = {20170130},
    Doi = {10.23736/S1973-9087.17.04612-3},
    Edat = {2017/02/02 06:00},
    Issn = {1973-9095 (Electronic); 1973-9087 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101465662},
    Journal = {Eur J Phys Rehabil Med},
    Jt = {European journal of physical and rehabilitation medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.23736/S1973-9087.17.04612-3 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170215},
    Mhda = {2017/02/02 06:00},
    Month = {Feb},
    Number = {1},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {139--143},
    Pii = {S1973-9087.17.04612-3},
    Pl = {Italy},
    Pmid = {28145399},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2017 Feb;53(1):139-143. doi: 10.23736/S1973-9087.17.04612-3. Epub 2017 Jan 30. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Functioning information in the learning health system.},
    Volume = {53},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S1973-9087.17.04612-3}}
  • [DOI] Lowes, Linda P., Garey H. Noritz, Amy Newmeyer, Peter J. Embi, Han Yin, and William E. Smoyer. “‘learn from every patient’: implementation and early results of a learning health system..” Dev med child neurol 59.2 (2017): 183-191. [Bibtex]
    @article{Lowes:2017aa,
    Abstract = {AIM: The convergence of three major trends in medicine, namely conversion to electronic health records (EHRs), prioritization of translational research, and the need to control healthcare expenditures, has created unprecedented interest and opportunities to develop systems that improve care while reducing costs. However, operationalizing a 'learning health system' requires systematic changes that have not yet been widely demonstrated in clinical practice. METHOD: We developed, implemented, and evaluated a model of EHR-supported care in a cohort of 131 children with cerebral palsy that integrated clinical care, quality improvement, and research, entitled 'Learn From Every Patient' (LFEP). RESULTS: Children treated in the LFEP Program for a 12-month period experienced a 43% reduction in total inpatient days (p=0.030 vs prior 12mo period), a 27% reduction in inpatient admissions, a 30% reduction in emergency department visits (p=0.001), and a 29% reduction in urgent care visits (p=0.046). LFEP Program implementation also resulted in reductions in healthcare costs of 210% (US$7014/child) versus a Time control group, and reductions of 176% ($6596/child) versus a Program Activities control group. Importantly, clinical implementation of the LFEP Program has also driven the continuous accumulation of robust research-quality data for both publication and implementation of evidence-based improvements in clinical care. INTERPRETATION: These results demonstrate that a learning health system can be developed and implemented in a cost-effective manner, and can integrate clinical care and research to systematically drive simultaneous clinical quality improvement and reduced healthcare costs.},
    Address = {Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.},
    Address1 = {Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.},
    Address2 = {Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.},
    Address3 = {Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters, Norfolk, VA, USA.},
    Address4 = {Department of Biomedical Informatics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.},
    Address5 = {Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.},
    Address6 = {Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA.},
    Address7 = {Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.},
    Author = {Lowes, Linda P and Noritz, Garey H and Newmeyer, Amy and Embi, Peter J and Yin, Han and Smoyer, William E},
    Cn = {'Learn from Every Patient' Study, Group},
    Copyright = {(c) 2016 Mac Keith Press.},
    Crdt = {2016/08/23 06:00},
    Da = {20160822},
    Date = {2017 Feb},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170501},
    Dep = {20160822},
    Doi = {10.1111/dmcn.13227},
    Edat = {2016/08/23 06:00},
    Fir = {Tidball, Abigail; Love, Lamara; Schmidt, Jeffery; Golias, Justin; Miller, Michelle},
    Ir = {Tidball A; Love L; Schmidt J; Golias J; Miller M},
    Issn = {1469-8749 (Electronic); 0012-1622 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0006761},
    Journal = {Dev Med Child Neurol},
    Jt = {Developmental medicine and child neurology},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1111/dmcn.13227 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170501},
    Mh = {Cerebral Palsy/economics/psychology/*therapy; Child; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; *Delivery of Health Care/economics/methods/utilization; Electronic Health Records/statistics \& numerical data; Female; *Health Education; Humans; Infant; Male; *Treatment Outcome},
    Mhda = {2017/05/02 06:00},
    Month = {Feb},
    Number = {2},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {183--191},
    Phst = {2016/06/15 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {27545839},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Dev Med Child Neurol. 2017 Feb;59(2):183-191. doi: 10.1111/dmcn.13227. Epub 2016 Aug 22. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {'Learn From Every Patient': implementation and early results of a learning health system.},
    Volume = {59},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.13227}}
  • [DOI] McGreevy, Paul, Peter Thomson, Navneet K. Dhand, David Raubenheimer, Sophie Masters, Caroline S. Mansfield, Timothy Baldwin, Ricardo J. Soares Magalhaes, Jacquie Rand, Peter Hill, Anne Peaston, James Gilkerson, Martin Combs, Shane Raidal, Peter Irwin, Peter Irons, Richard Squires, David Brodbelt, and Jeremy Hammond. “Vetcompass australia: a national big data collection system for veterinary science..” Animals (basel) 7.10 (2017). [Bibtex]
    @article{McGreevy:2017aa,
    Abstract = {VetCompass Australia is veterinary medical records-based research coordinated with the global VetCompass endeavor to maximize its quality and effectiveness for Australian companion animals (cats, dogs, and horses). Bringing together all seven Australian veterinary schools, it is the first nationwide surveillance system collating clinical records on companion-animal diseases and treatments. VetCompass data service collects and aggregates real-time, clinical records for researchers to interrogate, delivering sustainable and cost-effective access to data from hundreds of veterinary practitioners nationwide. Analysis of these clinical records will reveal geographical and temporal trends in the prevalence of inherited and acquired diseases, identify frequently prescribed treatments, revolutionize clinical auditing, help the veterinary profession to rank research priorities, and assure evidence-based companion-animal curricula in veterinary schools. VetCompass Australia will progress in three phases: (1) roll-out of the VetCompass platform to harvest Australian veterinary clinical record data; (2) development and enrichment of the coding (data-presentation) platform; and (3) creation of a world-first, real-time surveillance interface with natural language processing (NLP) technology. The first of these three phases is described in the current article. Advances in the collection and sharing of records from numerous practices will enable veterinary professionals to deliver a vastly improved level of care for companion animals that will improve their quality of life.},
    Address = {Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. paul.mcgreevy@sydney.edu.au.},
    Address1 = {School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. peter.thomson@sydney.edu.au.},
    Address10 = {School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA 5371, Australia. p.hill@adelaide.edu.au.},
    Address11 = {School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA 5371, Australia. anne.peaston@adelaide.edu.au.},
    Address12 = {Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia. jrgilk@unimelb.edu.au.},
    Address13 = {School of Animal and Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia. macombs@csu.edu.au.},
    Address14 = {School of Animal and Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia. shraidal@csu.edu.au.},
    Address15 = {School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia. p.irwin@murdoch.edu.au.},
    Address16 = {School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia. P.Irons@murdoch.edu.au.},
    Address17 = {College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Science, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia. richard.squires@jcu.edu.au.},
    Address18 = {Pathobiology and Population Services, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK. dbrodbelt@rvc.ac.uk.},
    Address19 = {Information and Communications Technology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. jeremy.hammond@sydney.edu.au.},
    Address2 = {Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. navneet.dhand@sydney.edu.au.},
    Address3 = {Charles Perkins Centre and School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. david.raubenheimer@sydney.edu.au.},
    Address4 = {Sydney School of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. sophie.masters@sydney.edu.au.},
    Address5 = {Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Werribee, VIC 3030, Australia. cmans@unimelb.edu.au.},
    Address6 = {School of Computing and Information Systems, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia. tb@ldwin.net.},
    Address7 = {School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia. r.magalhaes@uq.edu.au.},
    Address8 = {Child Health Research Centre, University of Queensland, South Brisbane, QLD 4101, Australia. r.magalhaes@uq.edu.au.},
    Address9 = {School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia. j.rand@uq.edu.au.},
    Auid = {ORCID: 0000-0002-7501-2415},
    Author = {McGreevy, Paul and Thomson, Peter and Dhand, Navneet K and Raubenheimer, David and Masters, Sophie and Mansfield, Caroline S and Baldwin, Timothy and Soares Magalhaes, Ricardo J and Rand, Jacquie and Hill, Peter and Peaston, Anne and Gilkerson, James and Combs, Martin and Raidal, Shane and Irwin, Peter and Irons, Peter and Squires, Richard and Brodbelt, David and Hammond, Jeremy},
    Coi = {The authors declare no conflicts of interest.},
    Crdt = {2017/09/29 06:00},
    Da = {20170928},
    Date = {2017 Sep 26},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dep = {20170926},
    Doi = {10.3390/ani7100074},
    Edat = {2017/09/29 06:00},
    Issn = {2076-2615 (Print); 2076-2615 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101635614},
    Journal = {Animals (Basel)},
    Jt = {Animals : an open access journal from MDPI},
    Keywords = {big data; canine; companion animals; disease surveillance; electronic patient record; epidemiology; equine; feline; veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {E74 {$[$}pii{$]$}; 10.3390/ani7100074 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170928},
    Mhda = {2017/09/29 06:01},
    Month = {Sep},
    Number = {10},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Phst = {2017/08/04 {$[$}received{$]$}; 2017/09/20 {$[$}revised{$]$}; 2017/09/21 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pii = {ani7100074},
    Pl = {Switzerland},
    Pmid = {28954419},
    Pst = {epublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {Animals (Basel). 2017 Sep 26;7(10). pii: E74. doi: 10.3390/ani7100074. },
    Status = {PubMed-not-MEDLINE},
    Title = {VetCompass Australia: A National Big Data Collection System for Veterinary Science.},
    Volume = {7},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani7100074}}
  • [DOI] Dean, R., M. Brennan, R. Ewers, C. Hudson, J. M. Daly, S. Baillie, M. C. Eisler, E. J. Place, J. Brearley, M. Holmes, I. Handel, D. Shaw, G. McLauchlan, A. McBrearty, P. Cripps, P. Jones, R. Smith, and K. Verheyen. “The challenge of teaching undergraduates evidence-based veterinary medicine..” Vet rec 181.11 (2017): 298-299. [Bibtex]
    @article{Dean:2017aa,
    Abstract = {The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons now lists 'How to evaluate evidence' as a day one competence for newly qualified vets. In this article, representatives from each of the veterinary schools in the UK discuss how the challenge of delivering and assessing the concepts of evidence-based veterinary medicine in a crowded undergraduate curriculum can be met.},
    Address = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.},
    Address1 = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.},
    Address10 = {Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Campus, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK.},
    Address11 = {Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush Campus, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK.},
    Address12 = {School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Campus, Bearsden Road, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK.},
    Address13 = {School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Campus, Bearsden Road, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK.},
    Address14 = {School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Neston, Cheshire CH64 7TE, UK.},
    Address15 = {School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Neston, Cheshire CH64 7TE, UK.},
    Address16 = {School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Neston, Cheshire CH64 7TE, UK.},
    Address17 = {Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK.},
    Address2 = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.},
    Address3 = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.},
    Address4 = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK.},
    Address5 = {School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford House, Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU, UK.},
    Address6 = {School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford House, Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU, UK.},
    Address7 = {School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford House, Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU, UK.},
    Address8 = {Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK.},
    Address9 = {Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK.},
    Author = {Dean, R and Brennan, M and Ewers, R and Hudson, C and Daly, J M and Baillie, S and Eisler, M C and Place, E J and Brearley, J and Holmes, M and Handel, I and Shaw, D and McLauchlan, G and McBrearty, A and Cripps, P and Jones, P and Smith, R and Verheyen, K},
    Copyright = {British Veterinary Association.},
    Crdt = {2017/09/17 06:00},
    Da = {20170916},
    Date = {2017 Sep 16},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170925},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.j3441},
    Edat = {2017/09/17 06:00},
    Issn = {2042-7670 (Electronic); 0042-4900 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0031164},
    Journal = {Vet Rec},
    Jt = {The Veterinary record},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/vr.j3441 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170925},
    Mh = {Curriculum; Education, Veterinary/*organization \& administration; Evidence-Based Medicine/*education; Humans; Schools, Veterinary; Teaching/*psychology; United Kingdom},
    Mhda = {2017/09/26 06:00},
    Month = {Sep},
    Number = {11},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {298--299},
    Pii = {vr.j3441},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {28916694},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Vet Rec. 2017 Sep 16;181(11):298-299. doi: 10.1136/vr.j3441. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {The challenge of teaching undergraduates evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {181},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.j3441}}
  • [DOI] Ferguson, Duncan C., Leslie Klis McNeil, David J. Schaeffe, and Eric M. Mills. “Encouraging critical clinical thinking (cct) skills in first-year veterinary students..” J vet med educ 44.3 (2017): 531-541. [Bibtex]
    @article{Ferguson:2017aa,
    Abstract = {First-year didactic course instructors at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine leverage earlier clinical rotation experiences with weekly "Clinical Correlations" exercises to provide early exposure to critical clinical thinking (CCT). This study evaluated the efficacy of individual and paired group exercises on CCT development. Before and after instruction, the Cornell Critical Thinking Test (Level Z) (CCTTZ) was administered. Based on the hypothesis that students with higher scores would coach lower-scoring colleagues during group exercises, heterogeneous groups with similar mean scores were established for the year. Students completed 14 individual and paired group exercises over 6 months. Exercises were designed to increase in complexity and decline in scaffolding. Seven of the exercises were cases using the Applied Learning Platform (ALP) at http://www.whenknowingmatters.com . Student analyses were scored according to a six-category critical-thinking rubric using a 5-point scale. Consistent with our hypothesis, individual and group rubric scores increased significantly, plateauing near the end of the year. Contrary to our hypothesis, mean overall CCTTZ scores did not change, but there was a small statistically significant increase in the ability to assess the validity of an argument. Student attitudes were mixed. Positive comments focused on reinforcement of prior didactic instruction, while negative comments focused on preparation time needed to conduct research on clinical concepts, and on a lack of explicit evaluation by summative examinations. Nonetheless, end-of-year GPAs correlated linearly with cumulative individual rubric scores. In summary, the value of early curriculum CCT training was confirmed when discipline-specific criteria were applied.},
    Author = {Ferguson, Duncan C and McNeil, Leslie Klis and Schaeffe, David J and Mills, Eric M},
    Crdt = {2017/09/07 06:00},
    Da = {20170906},
    Date = {2017 Fall},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Doi = {10.3138/jvme.0216-032R1},
    Edat = {2017/09/07 06:00},
    Issn = {0748-321X (Print); 0748-321X (Linking)},
    Jid = {7610519},
    Journal = {J Vet Med Educ},
    Jt = {Journal of veterinary medical education},
    Keywords = {critical clinical thinking; critical thinking; evidence-based medicine; problem solving},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.3138/jvme.0216-032R1 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170906},
    Mhda = {2017/09/07 06:00},
    Month = {Fall},
    Number = {3},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {531--541},
    Pl = {Canada},
    Pmid = {28876994},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {J Vet Med Educ. 2017 Fall;44(3):531-541. doi: 10.3138/jvme.0216-032R1. },
    Status = {In-Data-Review},
    Title = {Encouraging Critical Clinical Thinking (CCT) Skills in First-Year Veterinary Students.},
    Volume = {44},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/jvme.0216-032R1}}
  • [DOI] Macik, Maria L., Kristin P. Chaney, Jacqueline S. Turner, Kenita S. Rogers, Elizabeth M. Scallan, Jodi A. Korich, Debra Fowler, and Lisa M. Keefe. “Curriculum redesign in veterinary medicine: part ii..” J vet med educ 44.3 (2017): 563-569. [Bibtex]
    @article{Macik:2017aa,
    Abstract = {Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. On a larger scale, a comprehensive redesign effort involves forming a dedicated faculty redesign team, developing program learning outcomes, mapping the existing curriculum, and reviewing the curriculum in light of collected stakeholder data. The faculty of the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU) recently embarked on a comprehensive curriculum redesign effort through partnership with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence. Using a previously developed evidence-based model of program redesign, TAMU created a process for use in veterinary medical education, which is described in detail in the first part of this article series. An additional component of the redesign process that is understated, yet vital for success, is faculty buy-in and support. Without faculty engagement, implementation of data-driven curricular changes stemming from program evaluation may be challenging. This second part of the article series describes the methodology for encouraging faculty engagement through the final steps of the redesign initiative and the lessons learned by TAMU through the redesign process.},
    Author = {Macik, Maria L and Chaney, Kristin P and Turner, Jacqueline S and Rogers, Kenita S and Scallan, Elizabeth M and Korich, Jodi A and Fowler, Debra and Keefe, Lisa M},
    Crdt = {2017/09/07 06:00},
    Da = {20170906},
    Date = {2017 Fall},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Doi = {10.3138/jvme.0316-066R1},
    Edat = {2017/09/07 06:00},
    Issn = {0748-321X (Print); 0748-321X (Linking)},
    Jid = {7610519},
    Journal = {J Vet Med Educ},
    Jt = {Journal of veterinary medical education},
    Keywords = {curriculum redesign; data analysis; faculty engagement; stakeholder data},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.3138/jvme.0316-066R1 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170906},
    Mhda = {2017/09/07 06:00},
    Month = {Fall},
    Number = {3},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {563--569},
    Pl = {Canada},
    Pmid = {28876991},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {J Vet Med Educ. 2017 Fall;44(3):563-569. doi: 10.3138/jvme.0316-066R1. },
    Status = {In-Data-Review},
    Title = {Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part II.},
    Volume = {44},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/jvme.0316-066R1}}
  • [DOI] Dean, Rachel S.. “Veterinary clinical trials are on trial..” Vet rec 181.8 (2017): 193-194. [Bibtex]
    @article{Dean:2017ab,
    Address = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough LE12 5RD e-mail address: rachel.dean@nottingham.ac.uk.},
    Author = {Dean, Rachel S},
    Crdt = {2017/08/20 06:00},
    Da = {20170819},
    Date = {2017 Aug 19},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.j3867},
    Edat = {2017/08/20 06:00},
    Issn = {2042-7670 (Electronic); 0042-4900 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0031164},
    Journal = {Vet Rec},
    Jt = {The Veterinary record},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/vr.j3867 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170819},
    Mhda = {2017/08/20 06:00},
    Month = {Aug},
    Number = {8},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {193--194},
    Pii = {vr.j3867},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {28821699},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {Vet Rec. 2017 Aug 19;181(8):193-194. doi: 10.1136/vr.j3867. },
    Status = {In-Data-Review},
    Title = {Veterinary clinical trials are on trial.},
    Volume = {181},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.j3867}}
  • [DOI] Wareham, K. J., R. M. Hyde, D. Grindlay, M. L. Brennan, and R. S. Dean. “Sponsorship bias and quality of randomised controlled trials in veterinary medicine..” Bmc vet res 13.1 (2017): 234. [Bibtex]
    @article{Wareham:2017aa,
    Abstract = {BACKGROUND: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard form of evidence for assessing treatment efficacy, but many factors can influence their reliability including methodological quality, reporting quality and funding source. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between funding source and positive outcome reporting in veterinary RCTs published in 2011 and to assess the risk of bias in the RCTs identified. METHODS: A structured search of PubMed was used to identify feline, canine, equine, bovine and ovine clinical trials examining the efficacy of pharmaceutical interventions published in 2011. Funding source and outcomes were extracted from each RCT and an assessment of risk of bias made using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. RESULTS: Literature searches returned 972 papers, with 86 papers (comprising 126 individual RCTs) included in the analysis. There was found to be a significantly higher proportion of positive outcomes reported in the pharmaceutical funding group (P) compared to the non-pharmaceutical (NP) and 'no funding source stated' (NF) groups (P = 56.9%, NP = 34.9%, NF = 29.1%, p < 0.05). A high proportion of trials had an unclear risk of bias across the five criteria examined. CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence that veterinary RCTs were more likely to report positive outcomes if they have pharmaceutical industry funding or involvement. Consistently poor reporting of trials, including non-identification of funding source, was found which hinders the use of the available evidence.},
    Address = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK.},
    Address1 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK.},
    Address2 = {Centre of Evidence-based Dermatology, University ofNottingham, Kings Meadow campus, Lenton Lane, Nottingham, NG7 2NR, UK.},
    Address3 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK.},
    Address4 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK. Rachel.Dean@nottingham.ac.uk.},
    Author = {Wareham, K J and Hyde, R M and Grindlay, D and Brennan, M L and Dean, R S},
    Crdt = {2017/08/16 06:00},
    Da = {20170815},
    Date = {2017 Aug 14},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dep = {20170814},
    Doi = {10.1186/s12917-017-1146-9},
    Edat = {2017/08/16 06:00},
    Issn = {1746-6148 (Electronic); 1746-6148 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101249759},
    Journal = {BMC Vet Res},
    Jt = {BMC veterinary research},
    Keywords = {Clinical trials; Evidence based medicine; Risk of bias; Study design and data analysis},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1186/s12917-017-1146-9 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170818},
    Mhda = {2017/08/16 06:00},
    Month = {Aug},
    Number = {1},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {234},
    Phst = {2016/08/17 {$[$}received{$]$}; 2017/07/23 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pii = {10.1186/s12917-017-1146-9},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmc = {PMC5557072},
    Pmid = {28807033},
    Pst = {epublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {BMC Vet Res. 2017 Aug 14;13(1):234. doi: 10.1186/s12917-017-1146-9. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Sponsorship bias and quality of randomised controlled trials in veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {13},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12917-017-1146-9}}
  • [DOI] Giuffrida, Michelle A.. “Basic statistics for the exotic animal practitioner..” Vet clin north am exot anim pract 20.3 (2017): 947-959. [Bibtex]
    @article{Giuffrida:2017aa,
    Abstract = {Clinical research attempts to answer questions about patient populations by studying small samples of patients drawn from those populations. Statistics are used to describe the data collected in a study and to make inferences about the larger populations. Practitioners of evidence-based practice need a basic understanding of these principles to critically appraise the results of research studies. The main paradigm for statistical inference in medicine is called hypothesis testing, which involves generating a null hypothesis and examining the strength of evidence against it.},
    Address = {Small Animal Surgery, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Electronic address: magiuffrida@ucdavis.edu.},
    Author = {Giuffrida, Michelle A},
    Copyright = {Published by Elsevier Inc.},
    Crdt = {2017/08/08 06:00},
    Da = {20170807},
    Date = {2017 Sep},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Doi = {10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.007},
    Edat = {2017/08/07 06:00},
    Issn = {1558-4232 (Electronic); 1094-9194 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9815628},
    Journal = {Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract},
    Jt = {The veterinary clinics of North America. Exotic animal practice},
    Keywords = {Biostatistics; Clinical epidemiology; Evidence-based medicine; Evidence-based practice},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {S1094-9194(17)30176-7 {$[$}pii{$]$}; 10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.007 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170807},
    Mhda = {2017/08/07 06:00},
    Month = {Sep},
    Number = {3},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {947--959},
    Pii = {S1094-9194(17)30176-7},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {28781043},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article; Review},
    Source = {Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract. 2017 Sep;20(3):947-959. doi: 10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.007. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Basic Statistics for the Exotic Animal Practitioner.},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.007}}
  • [DOI] Giuffrida, Michelle A.. “Practical application of evidence-based practice..” Vet clin north am exot anim pract 20.3 (2017): 737-748. [Bibtex]
    @article{Giuffrida:2017ab,
    Abstract = {High-quality clinical practice requires veterinarians to stay abreast of new research and integrate relevant findings into patient care. Clinicians can achieve this goal using evidence-based practice (EBP), the stepwise process of integrating best research evidence into existing clinical decision-making processes. This article provides explanations and recommendations for performing key steps of the EBP process, with a focus on issues the exotic animal practitioner might encounter. Key areas of discussion include the development of focused PICO questions, types of literature and search strategies, and basic clinical epidemiology principles, including chance error, bias, confounding, and generalizability.},
    Address = {Small Animal Surgery, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Electronic address: magiuffrida@ucdavis.edu.},
    Author = {Giuffrida, Michelle A},
    Copyright = {Published by Elsevier Inc.},
    Crdt = {2017/08/08 06:00},
    Da = {20170807},
    Date = {2017 Sep},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Doi = {10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.001},
    Edat = {2017/08/07 06:00},
    Issn = {1558-4232 (Electronic); 1094-9194 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9815628},
    Journal = {Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract},
    Jt = {The veterinary clinics of North America. Exotic animal practice},
    Keywords = {Clinical epidemiology; Evidence-based medicine; Evidence-based practice},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {S1094-9194(17)30170-6 {$[$}pii{$]$}; 10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.001 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170807},
    Mhda = {2017/08/07 06:00},
    Month = {Sep},
    Number = {3},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {737--748},
    Pii = {S1094-9194(17)30170-6},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {28781031},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article; Review},
    Source = {Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract. 2017 Sep;20(3):737-748. doi: 10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.001. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Practical Application of Evidence-Based Practice.},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.001}}
  • [DOI] Di Girolamo, Nicola and Alexandra L. Winter. “Why should we direct our efforts toward evidence-based knowledge creation?.” Vet clin north am exot anim pract 20.3 (2017): 733-735. [Bibtex]
    @article{Di-Girolamo:2017aa,
    Abstract = {In the field of exotic animal medicine, there is much work to do, more than in human medicine and in companion animal medicine. The work in this field should be directed toward an evidence-based knowledge accumulation. Sound evidence supporting tests and treatments will ensure better health care for exotic animal patients.},
    Address = {Tai Wai Small Animal \& Exotic Hospital, 75 Chik Shun Street, Tai Wai, Shatin, Hong Kong; EBMVet, Via Sigismondo Trecchi 20, Cremona, Italy. Electronic address: nicoladiggi@gmail.com.},
    Address1 = {American Veterinary Medical Association, 1931 N. Meacham Road, Suite 100, Schaumburg, IL 60173, USA.},
    Author = {Di Girolamo, Nicola and Winter, Alexandra L},
    Copyright = {Copyright (c) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
    Crdt = {2017/08/08 06:00},
    Da = {20170807},
    Date = {2017 Sep},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Doi = {10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.011},
    Edat = {2017/08/07 06:00},
    Issn = {1558-4232 (Electronic); 1094-9194 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9815628},
    Journal = {Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract},
    Jt = {The veterinary clinics of North America. Exotic animal practice},
    Keywords = {Clinical epidemiology; Evidence-based medicine; Exotic animal medicine; History of evidence-based medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {S1094-9194(17)30180-9 {$[$}pii{$]$}; 10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.011 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170807},
    Mhda = {2017/08/07 06:00},
    Month = {Sep},
    Number = {3},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {733--735},
    Pii = {S1094-9194(17)30180-9},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {28781030},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article; Review},
    Source = {Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract. 2017 Sep;20(3):733-735. doi: 10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.011. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Why Should We Direct Our Efforts Toward Evidence-Based Knowledge Creation?},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cvex.2017.04.011}}
  • [DOI] Harvey, Naomi D., Peter J. Craigon, Simon A. Blythe, Gary C. W. England, and Lucy Asher. “An evidence-based decision assistance model for predicting training outcome in juvenile guide dogs..” Plos one 12.6 (2017): e0174261. [Bibtex]
    @article{Harvey:2017aa,
    Abstract = {Working dog organisations, such as Guide Dogs, need to regularly assess the behaviour of the dogs they train. In this study we developed a questionnaire-style behaviour assessment completed by training supervisors of juvenile guide dogs aged 5, 8 and 12 months old (n = 1,401), and evaluated aspects of its reliability and validity. Specifically, internal reliability, temporal consistency, construct validity, predictive criterion validity (comparing against later training outcome) and concurrent criterion validity (comparing against a standardised behaviour test) were evaluated. Thirty-nine questions were sourced either from previously published literature or created to meet requirements identified via Guide Dogs staff surveys and staff feedback. Internal reliability analyses revealed seven reliable and interpretable trait scales named according to the questions within them as: Adaptability; Body Sensitivity; Distractibility; Excitability; General Anxiety; Trainability and Stair Anxiety. Intra-individual temporal consistency of the scale scores between 5-8, 8-12 and 5-12 months was high. All scales excepting Body Sensitivity showed some degree of concurrent criterion validity. Predictive criterion validity was supported for all seven scales, since associations were found with training outcome, at at-least one age. Thresholds of z-scores on the scales were identified that were able to distinguish later training outcome by identifying 8.4% of all dogs withdrawn for behaviour and 8.5% of all qualified dogs, with 84% and 85% specificity. The questionnaire assessment was reliable and could detect traits that are consistent within individuals over time, despite juvenile dogs undergoing development during the study period. By applying thresholds to scores produced from the questionnaire this assessment could prove to be a highly valuable decision-making tool for Guide Dogs. This is the first questionnaire-style assessment of juvenile dogs that has shown value in predicting the training outcome of individual working dogs.},
    Address = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicester, United Kingdom.},
    Address1 = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicester, United Kingdom.},
    Address2 = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicester, United Kingdom.},
    Address3 = {The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association, Hillfields, Burghfield Common, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom.},
    Address4 = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicester, United Kingdom.},
    Address5 = {School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Leicester, United Kingdom.},
    Address6 = {Centre for Behaviour and Evolution, Henry Wellcome Building, Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom.},
    Auid = {ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9208-7734},
    Author = {Harvey, Naomi D and Craigon, Peter J and Blythe, Simon A and England, Gary C W and Asher, Lucy},
    Crdt = {2017/06/15 06:00},
    Da = {20170614},
    Date = {2017},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170914},
    Dep = {20170614},
    Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0174261},
    Edat = {2017/06/15 06:00},
    Issn = {1932-6203 (Electronic); 1932-6203 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101285081},
    Journal = {PLoS One},
    Jt = {PloS one},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1371/journal.pone.0174261 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170914},
    Mh = {Animals; Anxiety/psychology; *Behavior, Animal; Dogs/*psychology; Humans; Program Evaluation; Surveys and Questionnaires/*standards},
    Mhda = {2017/09/15 06:00},
    Number = {6},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {e0174261},
    Phst = {2016/06/06 {$[$}received{$]$}; 2017/03/06 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pii = {PONE-D-16-22690},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmc = {PMC5470660},
    Pmid = {28614347},
    Pst = {epublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {PLoS One. 2017 Jun 14;12(6):e0174261. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174261. eCollection 2017. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {An evidence-based decision assistance model for predicting training outcome in juvenile guide dogs.},
    Volume = {12},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0174261}}
  • [DOI] Davis, David A., William F. Rayburn, and Gary A. Smith. “Continuing professional development for faculty: an elephant in the house of academic medicine or the key to future success?.” Acad med 92.8 (2017): 1078-1081. [Bibtex]
    @article{Davis:2017aa,
    Abstract = {The scope of change required by academic medical centers (AMCs) to maintain their viability and achieve their tripartite mission in the future is large; such reform is affected by numerous global, national, and local forces. Most AMCs focus their transformational efforts on organizational infrastructure (e.g., undertaking payment reform, developing new organizational structures, investing in information technology) and educational programs (with subsequent changes in undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula). Although useful, these efforts have failed to produce the kind of change required for AMCs to succeed in the future.The authors of this Invited Commentary describe a key element missing from most of these reform efforts-the preparation of faculty for new models of health care and educational practice. To address this issue, they call for the effective, system-aligned presence of continuing professional development (CPD) programs. CPD combines continuing medical education, with its focus on content knowledge, and faculty development, with its focus on evidence-based learning methodologies, across the institution to produce a more robust, system- and outcomes-oriented program to facilitate both individual and organizational learning. If sufficiently supported, CPD programs can provide a platform for the human changes necessary to ensure the smooth transition of AMCs to new models of education, clinical research, and ultimately patient care.},
    Address = {D.A. Davis is professor emeritus, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. W.F. Rayburn is distinguished professor and associate dean, Continuing Medical Education and Professional Development, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico. G.A. Smith is assistant dean, Faculty Development in Education, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, and professor of organization, information, and learning sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico.},
    Author = {Davis, David A and Rayburn, William F and Smith, Gary A},
    Crdt = {2017/06/01 06:00},
    Da = {20170531},
    Date = {2017 Aug},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170821},
    Doi = {10.1097/ACM.0000000000001777},
    Edat = {2017/06/01 06:00},
    Issn = {1938-808X (Electronic); 1040-2446 (Linking)},
    Jid = {8904605},
    Journal = {Acad Med},
    Jt = {Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1097/ACM.0000000000001777 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170821},
    Mh = {Academic Medical Centers/*organization \& administration; Adult; *Curriculum; Education, Medical, Graduate/*organization \& administration; Faculty, Medical/*education; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Staff Development/*organization \& administration},
    Mhda = {2017/08/22 06:00},
    Month = {Aug},
    Number = {8},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {1078--1081},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {28562453},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Sb = {AIM; IM},
    Source = {Acad Med. 2017 Aug;92(8):1078-1081. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001777. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Continuing Professional Development for Faculty: An Elephant in the House of Academic Medicine or the Key to Future Success?},
    Volume = {92},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001777}}
  • [DOI] Di Girolamo, N., M. A. Giuffrida, A. L. Winter, and R. Meursinge Reynders. “In veterinary trials reporting and communication regarding randomisation procedures is suboptimal..” Vet rec 181.8 (2017): 195. [Bibtex]
    @article{Di-Girolamo:2017ab,
    Abstract = {To evaluate randomisation mechanisms in the veterinary literature, all trials defined as 'randomised' were extracted from five leading veterinary journals for the year 2013. Three blinded investigators evaluated (1) if the random sequence generation was actually non-random, and (2) whether method (CONSORT item 8A) and (3) type of randomisation (CONSORT item 8B) were reported. Trialists were contacted via email to establish (1) willingness to respond to questions on randomisation procedures, (2) whether reporting of randomisation improved following a suggestion to use the CONSORT 2010 guideline. Seven per cent ((95 per cent CI 2 to 12 per cent); 8/114) of the trials defined as 'randomised' explicitly used methods that are considered non-random. Almost half of the trials (49 per cent (40 to 59 per cent); 52/106) did not report any mechanism of randomisation. Only 13 trials (12.3 per cent (6 to 19 per cent); 13/106) reported both items. 39 of 114 (34.2 per cent) trialists contacted were willing to respond to further questions on randomisation mechanisms; 4 (3.5 per cent) trialists were unwilling and 71 (62.3 per cent) trialists did not respond. Email correspondence resulted in a mean clarification of 0.7 items (95 per cent CI 0.4 to 1.0) for the 15 trials for trialists that replied. Improved adherence to CONSORT guidelines and trialists communication is imperative to increase the quality of published evidence in veterinary medicine and to reduce research waste.},
    Address = {EBMVet, Via Sigismondo Trecchi, 20, Cremona CR 26100, Italy.},
    Address1 = {University of California Davis, Surgical \& Radiological Sciences, Davis, California, USA.},
    Address2 = {American Veterinary Medical Association, 1931 N. Meacham Rd, Suite 100, Schaumburg, Illinois 60173, USA.},
    Address3 = {Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.},
    Author = {Di Girolamo, N and Giuffrida, M A and Winter, A L and Meursinge Reynders, R},
    Copyright = {British Veterinary Association.},
    Crdt = {2017/05/11 06:00},
    Da = {20170510},
    Date = {2017 Aug 19},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170825},
    Dep = {20170509},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.104035},
    Edat = {2017/05/11 06:00},
    Issn = {2042-7670 (Electronic); 0042-4900 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0031164},
    Journal = {Vet Rec},
    Jt = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Clinical trials; Evidence-based medicine; clinical epidemiology; methodology; randomisation; randomised controlled trials},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/vr.104035 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170825},
    Mh = {Animals; Communication; Humans; Periodicals as Topic; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/*standards/*veterinary; Research Report/standards; Veterinary Medicine},
    Mhda = {2017/08/26 06:00},
    Month = {Aug},
    Number = {8},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {195},
    Phst = {2017/04/07 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pii = {vr.104035},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {28487452},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Vet Rec. 2017 Aug 19;181(8):195. doi: 10.1136/vr.104035. Epub 2017 May 9. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {In veterinary trials reporting and communication regarding randomisation procedures is suboptimal.},
    Volume = {181},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.104035}}
  • [DOI] Hyde, Bobby and Marnie Brennan. “Bestbets for vets..” Vet rec 180.15 (2017): 380-381. [Bibtex]
    @article{Hyde:2017aa,
    Abstract = {BestBETs for Vets are generated by the Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine at the University of Nottingham to help answer specific questions and assist in clinical decision making. Although evidence is often limited, they aim to find, present and draw conclusions from the best available evidence, using a standardised framework. A more detailed description of how BestBETs for Vets are produced was published in a previous issue of Veterinary Record (VR, April 4, 2015, pp 354-356).},
    Address = {University of Nottingham.},
    Address1 = {University of Nottingham.},
    Author = {Hyde, Bobby and Brennan, Marnie},
    Copyright = {British Veterinary Association.},
    Crdt = {2017/04/15 06:00},
    Da = {20170414},
    Date = {2017 Apr 15},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170424},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.j1635},
    Edat = {2017/04/15 06:00},
    Issn = {2042-7670 (Electronic); 0042-4900 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0031164},
    Journal = {Vet Rec},
    Jt = {The Veterinary record},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/vr.j1635 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170424},
    Mh = {Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration \& dosage/*pharmacology; Cattle; Cattle Diseases/*drug therapy; Cephapirin/administration \& dosage/*pharmacology; Endometritis/drug therapy/*veterinary; Evidence-Based Medicine; Female; Fertility/*drug effects/physiology; Pregnancy; Veterinary Medicine},
    Mhda = {2017/04/25 06:00},
    Month = {Apr},
    Number = {15},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {380--381},
    Pii = {vr.j1635},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {28408513},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Rn = {0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 89B59H32VN (Cephapirin)},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Vet Rec. 2017 Apr 15;180(15):380-381. doi: 10.1136/vr.j1635. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {BestBETs for Vets.},
    Volume = {180},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.j1635}}
  • [DOI] “Evidence-based colic resource launched..” Vet rec 180.14 (2017): 344. [Bibtex]
    @article{:2017aa,
    Crdt = {2017/04/08 06:00},
    Da = {20170407},
    Date = {2017 Apr 08},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.j1719},
    Edat = {2017/04/08 06:00},
    Issn = {2042-7670 (Electronic); 0042-4900 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0031164},
    Journal = {Vet Rec},
    Jt = {The Veterinary record},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/vr.j1719 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170407},
    Mhda = {2017/04/08 06:00},
    Month = {Apr},
    Number = {14},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {344},
    Pii = {vr.j1719},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {28385745},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {Vet Rec. 2017 Apr 8;180(14):344. doi: 10.1136/vr.j1719. },
    Status = {In-Data-Review},
    Title = {Evidence-based colic resource launched.},
    Volume = {180},
    Year = {2017},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.j1719}}

2016

  • [DOI] Wysham, Nicholas G., Lynn Howie, Krish Patel, Blake C. Cameron, Gregory P. Samsa, Laura Roe, Amy P. Abernethy, and Aimee Zaas. “Development and refinement of a learning health systems training program..” Egems (wash dc) 4.1 (2016): 1236. [Bibtex]
    @article{Wysham:2016aa,
    Abstract = {CONTEXT: In the emerging Learning Health System (LHS), the application and generation of medical knowledge are a natural outgrowth of patient care. Achieving this ideal requires a physician workforce adept in information systems, quality improvement methods, and systems-based practice to be able to use existing data to inform future care. These skills are not currently taught in medical school or graduate medical education. CASE DESCRIPTION: We initiated a first-ever Learning Health Systems Training Program (LHSTP) for resident physicians. The curriculum builds analytical, informatics and systems engineering skills through an active-learning project utilizing health system data that culminates in a final presentation to health system leadership. FINDINGS: LHSTP has been in place for two years, with 14 participants from multiple medical disciplines. Challenges included scheduling, mentoring, data standardization, and iterative optimization of the curriculum for real-time instruction. Satisfaction surveys and feedback were solicited mid-year in year 2. Most respondents were satisfied with the program, and several participants wished to continue in the program in various capacities after their official completion. MAJOR THEMES: We adapted our curriculum to successes and challenges encountered in the first two years. Modifications include a revised approach to teaching statistics, smaller cohorts, and more intensive mentorship. We continue to explore ways for our graduates to remain involved in the LHSTP and to disseminate this program to other institutions. CONCLUSION: The LHSTP is a novel curriculum that trains physicians to lead towards the LHS. Successful methods have included diverse multidisciplinary educators, just in time instruction, tailored content, and mentored projects with local health system impact.},
    Address = {Duke University.},
    Address1 = {Duke University.},
    Address2 = {Duke University.},
    Address3 = {Duke University School of Medicine.},
    Address4 = {Duke University Medical Center.},
    Address5 = {Duke University Medical Center.},
    Address6 = {Flatiron Health, Inc.},
    Address7 = {Duke University.},
    Author = {Wysham, Nicholas G and Howie, Lynn and Patel, Krish and Cameron, C Blake and Samsa, Gregory P and Roe, Laura and Abernethy, Amy P and Zaas, Aimee},
    Crdt = {2017/02/04 06:00},
    Da = {20170203},
    Date = {2016},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dep = {20161116},
    Doi = {10.13063/2327-9214.1236},
    Edat = {2017/02/06 06:00},
    Gr = {T32 DK007731/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States},
    Issn = {2327-9214 (Print); 2327-9214 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101629606},
    Journal = {EGEMS (Wash DC)},
    Jt = {EGEMS (Washington, DC)},
    Keywords = {Data Use and Quality; Electronic Health Record; Learning Health System; Provider Education; Quality Improvement},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.13063/2327-9214.1236 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170816},
    Mhda = {2017/02/06 06:01},
    Number = {1},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {1236},
    Pii = {egems1236},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmc = {PMC5226386},
    Pmid = {28154832},
    Pst = {epublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {EGEMS (Wash DC). 2016 Nov 16;4(1):1236. doi: 10.13063/2327-9214.1236. eCollection 2016. },
    Status = {PubMed-not-MEDLINE},
    Title = {Development and Refinement of a Learning Health Systems Training Program.},
    Volume = {4},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.13063/2327-9214.1236}}
  • [DOI] Krumholz, Harlan M., Sharon F. Terry, and Joanne Waldstreicher. “Data acquisition, curation, and use for a continuously learning health system..” Jama 316.16 (2016): 1669-1670. [Bibtex]
    @article{Krumholz:2016aa,
    Address = {Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.},
    Address1 = {Genetic Alliance, Washington, DC.},
    Address2 = {Johnson \& Johnson, New Brunswick, New Jersey.},
    Author = {Krumholz, Harlan M and Terry, Sharon F and Waldstreicher, Joanne},
    Crdt = {2016/09/27 06:00},
    Da = {20160926},
    Date = {2016 Oct 25},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20161213},
    Doi = {10.1001/jama.2016.12537},
    Edat = {2016/10/27 06:00},
    Issn = {1538-3598 (Electronic); 0098-7484 (Linking)},
    Jid = {7501160},
    Journal = {JAMA},
    Jt = {JAMA},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1001/jama.2016.12537 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20161230},
    Mh = {*Artificial Intelligence; *Data Curation; *Health Information Exchange/trends; Information Dissemination/legislation \& jurisprudence; Machine Learning; Medical Informatics},
    Mhda = {2016/12/15 06:00},
    Month = {Oct},
    Number = {16},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {1669--1670},
    Pii = {2556006},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {27668668},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
    Sb = {AIM; IM},
    Source = {JAMA. 2016 Oct 25;316(16):1669-1670. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.12537. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Data Acquisition, Curation, and Use for a Continuously Learning Health System.},
    Volume = {316},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2016.12537}}
  • [DOI] Myers, Sage R., Brendan G. Carr, and Charles C. Branas. “Uniting big health data for a national learning health system in the united states..” Jama pediatr 170.12 (2016): 1133-1134. [Bibtex]
    @article{Myers:2016aa,
    Address = {Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia2Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.},
    Address1 = {Department of Emergency Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.},
    Address2 = {Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.},
    Author = {Myers, Sage R and Carr, Brendan G and Branas, Charles C},
    Crdt = {2016/10/11 06:00},
    Da = {20161010},
    Date = {2016 Dec 01},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Doi = {10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2719},
    Edat = {2016/10/11 06:00},
    Gr = {L30 AA015802/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/United States; R01 CE001615/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States; R01 HS018362/HS/AHRQ HHS/United States; R21 LM008700/LM/NLM NIH HHS/United States},
    Issn = {2168-6211 (Electronic); 2168-6203 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101589544},
    Journal = {JAMA Pediatr},
    Jt = {JAMA pediatrics},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2719 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170220},
    Mhda = {2016/10/11 06:00},
    Month = {Dec},
    Number = {12},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {1133--1134},
    Pii = {2557390},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {27723889},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {JAMA Pediatr. 2016 Dec 1;170(12):1133-1134. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2719. },
    Status = {In-Data-Review},
    Title = {Uniting Big Health Data for a National Learning Health System in the United States.},
    Volume = {170},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2016.2719}}
  • [DOI] Friedrichs, Kristen R.. “Can evidence-based medicine be applied to the theory of reference intervals?.” Vet clin pathol 45.4 (2016): 529-530. [Bibtex]
    @article{Friedrichs:2016aa,
    Address = {Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.},
    Author = {Friedrichs, Kristen R},
    Crdt = {2016/12/16 06:00},
    Da = {20161215},
    Date = {2016 Dec},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170809},
    Doi = {10.1111/vcp.12422},
    Edat = {2016/12/16 06:00},
    Issn = {1939-165X (Electronic); 0275-6382 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9880575},
    Journal = {Vet Clin Pathol},
    Jt = {Veterinary clinical pathology},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1111/vcp.12422 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170809},
    Mh = {Animals; *Evidence-Based Medicine; Reference Values},
    Mhda = {2017/08/10 06:00},
    Month = {Dec},
    Number = {4},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {529--530},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {27977058},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Editorial},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Vet Clin Pathol. 2016 Dec;45(4):529-530. doi: 10.1111/vcp.12422. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Can evidence-based medicine be applied to the theory of reference intervals?},
    Volume = {45},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vcp.12422}}
  • [DOI] Downes, Martin J., Marnie L. Brennan, Hywel C. Williams, and Rachel S. Dean. “Development of a critical appraisal tool to assess the quality of cross-sectional studies (axis)..” Bmj open 6.12 (2016): e011458. [Bibtex]
    @article{Downes:2016aa,
    Abstract = {OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to develop a critical appraisal (CA) tool that addressed study design and reporting quality as well as the risk of bias in cross-sectional studies (CSSs). In addition, the aim was to produce a help document to guide the non-expert user through the tool. DESIGN: An initial scoping review of the published literature and key epidemiological texts was undertaken prior to the formation of a Delphi panel to establish key components for a CA tool for CSSs. A consensus of 80% was required from the Delphi panel for any component to be included in the final tool. RESULTS: An initial list of 39 components was identified through examination of existing resources. An international Delphi panel of 18 medical and veterinary experts was established. After 3 rounds of the Delphi process, the Appraisal tool for Cross-Sectional Studies (AXIS tool) was developed by consensus and consisted of 20 components. A detailed explanatory document was also developed with the tool, giving expanded explanation of each question and providing simple interpretations and examples of the epidemiological concepts being examined in each question to aid non-expert users. CONCLUSIONS: CA of the literature is a vital step in evidence synthesis and therefore evidence-based decision-making in a number of different disciplines. The AXIS tool is therefore unique and was developed in a way that it can be used across disciplines to aid the inclusion of CSSs in systematic reviews, guidelines and clinical decision-making.},
    Address = {Centre for Applied Health Economics, School of Medicine, Griffith University, Meadowbrook, Queensland, Australia.},
    Address1 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, The University of Nottingham, Loughborough, UK.},
    Address2 = {Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.},
    Address3 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, The University of Nottingham, Loughborough, UK.},
    Author = {Downes, Martin J and Brennan, Marnie L and Williams, Hywel C and Dean, Rachel S},
    Coi = {Conflicts of Interest: None declared.},
    Copyright = {Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.},
    Crdt = {2016/12/10 06:00},
    Da = {20161209},
    Date = {2016 Dec 08},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dep = {20161208},
    Doi = {10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011458},
    Edat = {2016/12/10 06:00},
    Issn = {2044-6055 (Electronic); 2044-6055 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101552874},
    Journal = {BMJ Open},
    Jt = {BMJ open},
    Keywords = {Critical appraisal; Cross sectional studies; Delphi; Evidence-based Healthcare},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011458 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170224},
    Mhda = {2016/12/10 06:00},
    Month = {Dec},
    Number = {12},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {e011458},
    Pii = {bmjopen-2016-011458},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmc = {PMC5168618},
    Pmid = {27932337},
    Pst = {epublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {BMJ Open. 2016 Dec 8;6(12):e011458. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011458. },
    Status = {In-Process},
    Title = {Development of a critical appraisal tool to assess the quality of cross-sectional studies (AXIS).},
    Volume = {6},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011458}}
  • [DOI] Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo and Geraldo Borges de Morais Filho. “Attitudes, awareness and barriers regarding evidence-based orthopedic surgery between health professionals from a brazilian public health system (sus) hospital: study of 400 patients..” Anesth essays res 10.3 (2016): 546-551. [Bibtex]
    @article{Imbelloni:2016aa,
    Abstract = {BACKGROUND: The fast-track concept refers to all phases of perioperative care: Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative strategies. Although most research has focused on adherence to medication, adherence also encompasses numerous health-related behaviors. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the attitudes and awareness among health professionals involved in the treatment of elderly patients with fractures of the femur and the results of 400 patients. METHODS: The postoperative protocol acceleration was presented to various hospital departments through four seminars. Questionnaire with four ex-residents in the Department of Anesthesiology was conducted. Every 6 months, the results of project implementation to all departments were presented. It was considered adherence to the project when the professionals agreed with all the steps and routines of the project. Patients underwent spinal anesthesia with postoperative analgesia by lumbar plexus block. RESULTS: All departments involved in the treatment of elderly patients' adhered completely to the project and reported the importance of preanesthetic visit, the explanations of design, and reduction of fasting period. Just one anesthetist completely adhered to the project. No former resident of anesthesia joined the program. All parameters studied in 400 patients compared with the data before the project showed a reduction from 21.38% to 100%. CONCLUSION: Improving adherence requires a continuous and dynamic process. We can be inferred that the implementation of fast-track project Brazilian Public Health System (Sistema Unico Saude, SUS) costs decreased with elderly patients with hip fractures. The anesthesiologist was the major obstacle to deployment to all patients.},
    Address = {Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine Nova Esperanca, PB, Brazil; Department of Anesthesiology, Anesthesiologist Complexo Hospitalar Mangabeira, Joao Pessoa, PB, Brazil.},
    Address1 = {Master in Labour Economics, UFPB, PB, Brazil; Statistician of the Complexo Hospitalar Mangabeira, Joao Pessoa, PB, Brazil.},
    Author = {Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo and de Morais Filho, Geraldo Borges},
    Crdt = {2016/10/18 06:00},
    Da = {20161017},
    Date = {2016 Sep-Dec},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Doi = {10.4103/0259-1162.183164},
    Edat = {2016/10/18 06:00},
    Issn = {0259-1162 (Print); 2229-7685 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101578762},
    Journal = {Anesth Essays Res},
    Jt = {Anesthesia, essays and researches},
    Keywords = {Fasting; fast-track surgery; medical adherence; orthopedic; perioperative care; spinal anesthesia; surgery},
    Language = {eng},
    Lr = {20170220},
    Mhda = {2016/10/18 06:01},
    Month = {Sep-Dec},
    Number = {3},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {546--551},
    Pii = {AER-10-546},
    Pl = {India},
    Pmc = {PMC5062243},
    Pmid = {27746549},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Source = {Anesth Essays Res. 2016 Sep-Dec;10(3):546-551. },
    Status = {PubMed-not-MEDLINE},
    Title = {Attitudes, awareness and barriers regarding evidence-based orthopedic surgery between health professionals from a Brazilian Public Health System (SUS) hospital: Study of 400 patients.},
    Volume = {10},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0259-1162.183164}}
  • [DOI] Dean, Rachel and Marnie Brennan. “Dearth of evidence for ebvm..” Vet rec 179.10 (2016): 258-259. [Bibtex]
    @article{Dean:2016aa,
    Address = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, College Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD. e-mail: rachel.dean@nottingham.ac.uk.},
    Address1 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, College Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD. e-mail: rachel.dean@nottingham.ac.uk.},
    Author = {Dean, Rachel and Brennan, Marnie},
    Con = {Vet Rec. 2016 Aug 20;179(8):202. PMID: 27550336},
    Crdt = {2016/09/10 06:00},
    Da = {20160909},
    Date = {2016 Sep 10},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170808},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.i4830},
    Edat = {2016/09/10 06:00},
    Issn = {2042-7670 (Electronic); 0042-4900 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0031164},
    Journal = {Vet Rec},
    Jt = {The Veterinary record},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/vr.i4830 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170817},
    Mh = {Animals; *Evidence-Based Medicine},
    Mhda = {2017/08/09 06:00},
    Month = {Sep},
    Number = {10},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {258--259},
    Pii = {vr.i4830},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {27609964},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Letter; Comment},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Vet Rec. 2016 Sep 10;179(10):258-9. doi: 10.1136/vr.i4830. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Dearth of evidence for EBVM.},
    Volume = {179},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.i4830}}
  • [DOI] Nicholson, Ian. “Dearth of evidence for ebvm..” Vet rec 179.9 (2016): 231. [Bibtex]
    @article{Nicholson:2016aa,
    Address = {Association for Veterinary Soft Tissue Surgery Research Cooperative, Southern Counties Veterinary Specialists, Forest Corner Farm, Hangersley, Ringwood, Hampshire BH24 3JW, e-mail: inicholsonvet@gmail.com.},
    Author = {Nicholson, Ian},
    Con = {Vet Rec. 2016 Aug 20;179(8):202. PMID: 27550336},
    Crdt = {2016/09/03 06:00},
    Da = {20160902},
    Date = {2016 Sep 03},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170808},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.i4719},
    Edat = {2016/09/03 06:00},
    Issn = {2042-7670 (Electronic); 0042-4900 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0031164},
    Journal = {Vet Rec},
    Jt = {The Veterinary record},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/vr.i4719 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170817},
    Mh = {Animals; *Evidence-Based Medicine},
    Mhda = {2017/08/09 06:00},
    Month = {Sep},
    Number = {9},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {231},
    Pii = {vr.i4719},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmid = {27585897},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Letter; Comment},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Vet Rec. 2016 Sep 3;179(9):231. doi: 10.1136/vr.i4719. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Dearth of evidence for EBVM.},
    Volume = {179},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.i4719}}
  • [DOI] Huntley, Selene J., Rachel S. Dean, Andrew Massey, and Marnie L. Brennan. “International evidence-based medicine survey of the veterinary profession: information sources used by veterinarians..” Plos one 11.7 (2016): e0159732. [Bibtex]
    @article{Huntley:2016aa,
    Abstract = {Veterinarians are encouraged to use evidence to inform their practice, but it is unknown what resources (e.g. journals, electronic sources) are accessed by them globally. Understanding the key places veterinarians seek information can inform where new clinically relevant evidence should most effectively be placed. An international survey was conducted to gain understanding of how veterinary information is accessed by veterinarians worldwide. There were 2137 useable responses to the questionnaire from veterinarians in 78 countries. The majority of respondents (n = 1835/2137, 85.9%) undertook clinical work and worked in a high income country (n = 1576/1762, 89.4%). Respondents heard about the survey via national veterinary organisations or regulatory bodies (31.5%), online veterinary forums and websites (22.7%), regional, discipline-based or international veterinary organisations (22.7%) or by direct invitation from the researchers or via friends, colleagues or social media (7.6%). Clinicians and non-clinicians reportedly used journals most commonly (65.8%, n = 1207/1835; 75.6%, n = 216/286) followed by electronic resources (58.7%, n = 1077/1835; 55.9%, n = 160/286), respectively. Respondents listed a total of 518 journals and 567 electronic sources that they read. Differences in veterinarian preference for resources in developed, and developing countries, were found. The nominated journals most read were the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (12.7% of nominations) for clinicians and the Veterinary Record (5.7%) for non-clinicians. The most accessed electronic resource reported was the Veterinary Information Network (25.6%) for clinicians and PubMed (7.4%) for non-clinicians. In conclusion, a wide array of journals and electronic resources appear to be accessed by veterinarians worldwide. Veterinary organisations appear to play an important role in global communication and outreach to veterinarians and consideration should be given to how these channels could be best utilised for effective dissemination of key research findings.},
    Address = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.},
    Address1 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.},
    Address2 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.},
    Address3 = {Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, The University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire, United Kingdom.},
    Auid = {ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4893-6583},
    Author = {Huntley, Selene J and Dean, Rachel S and Massey, Andrew and Brennan, Marnie L},
    Crdt = {2016/07/27 06:00},
    Da = {20160727},
    Date = {2016},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170728},
    Dep = {20160726},
    Doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0159732},
    Edat = {2016/07/28 06:00},
    Issn = {1932-6203 (Electronic); 1932-6203 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101285081},
    Journal = {PLoS One},
    Jt = {PloS one},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1371/journal.pone.0159732 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170728},
    Mh = {Data Mining/methods; Evidence-Based Medicine/*methods/standards; Internet; *Periodicals as Topic; Veterinarians/statistics \& numerical data; Veterinary Medicine/*methods/standards},
    Mhda = {2017/07/29 06:00},
    Number = {7},
    Oid = {NLM: PMC4961404},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {e0159732},
    Phst = {2016/04/11 {$[$}received{$]$}; 2016/07/07 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pii = {PONE-D-16-14623},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmc = {PMC4961404},
    Pmid = {27458724},
    Pst = {epublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {PLoS One. 2016 Jul 26;11(7):e0159732. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159732. eCollection 2016. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {International Evidence-Based Medicine Survey of the Veterinary Profession: Information Sources Used by Veterinarians.},
    Volume = {11},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159732}}
  • [DOI] Shurtz, Suzanne, Virginia Fajt, Erla P. Heyns, Hannah F. Norton, and Sandra Weingart. “Teaching evidence-based veterinary medicine in the us and canada..” J vet med educ (2016): 1-9. [Bibtex]
    @article{Shurtz:2016aa,
    Abstract = {There is no comprehensive review of the extent to which evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is taught in AVMA-accredited colleges of veterinary medicine in the US and Canada. We surveyed teaching faculty and librarians at these institutions to determine what EBVM skills are currently included in curricula, how they are taught, and to what extent librarians are involved in this process. Librarians appear to be an underused resource, as 59% of respondents did not use librarians/library resources in teaching EBVM. We discovered that there is no standard teaching methodology nor are there common learning activities for EBVM among our survey respondents, who represent 22 institutions. Respondents reported major barriers to inclusion such as a perceived shortage of time in an already-crowded course of study, and a lack of high-quality evidence and point-of-care tools. Suggestions for overcoming these barriers include collaborating with librarians and using new EBVM online teaching resources.},
    Author = {Shurtz, Suzanne and Fajt, Virginia and Heyns, Erla P and Norton, Hannah F and Weingart, Sandra},
    Crdt = {2016/07/15 06:00},
    Da = {20160714},
    Date = {2016 Jul 14},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-07 20:05:03 +0000},
    Dep = {20160714},
    Doi = {10.3138/jvme.1215-199R},
    Edat = {2016/07/15 06:00},
    Issn = {0748-321X (Print); 0748-321X (Linking)},
    Jid = {7610519},
    Journal = {J Vet Med Educ},
    Jt = {Journal of veterinary medical education},
    Keywords = {evidence-based veterinary medicine; information resources in veterinary medicine; instruction; literature searching; skills; veterinary medical librarians},
    Language = {eng},
    Lr = {20160714},
    Mhda = {2016/07/15 06:00},
    Month = {Jul},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {1--9},
    Pl = {Canada},
    Pmid = {27415038},
    Pst = {aheadofprint},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Status = {Publisher},
    Title = {Teaching Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine in the US and Canada.},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/jvme.1215-199R}}
  • [DOI] Colville, Patricia, Sally Everitt, and Alan Radford. “Collecting the evidence for EBVM..” The veterinary record 178.7 (2016): 174. [Bibtex]
    @article{colville_collecting_2016,
    Author = {Colville, Patricia and Everitt, Sally and Radford, Alan},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.i794},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine/*economics, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/*economics},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {174},
    Pmid = {26868246},
    Title = {Collecting the evidence for {EBVM}.},
    Volume = {178},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.i794}}
  • [DOI] Lanyon, L.. “Collecting the evidence for EBVM: who pays?.” The veterinary record 178.5 (2016): 120-121. [Bibtex]
    @article{lanyon_collecting_2016,
    Author = {Lanyon, L.},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.i254},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Clinical Competence/economics, Education, Veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine/*economics, Humans, Professional-Patient Relations, Veterinary Medicine/*economics},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {120--121},
    Pmid = {26823312},
    Title = {Collecting the evidence for {EBVM}: who pays?},
    Volume = {178},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.i254}}
  • [DOI] Rees, Gwen, David C. Barrett, Jennifer Boocock, Matthew Dickinson, Claire Johnson, Thomas Mitchell, Emma Place, and Kristen K. Reyher. “Clinical Decision Making..” The veterinary record 178.5 (2016): 118-119. [Bibtex]
    @article{rees_clinical_2016,
    Author = {Rees, Gwen and Barrett, David C. and Boocock, Jennifer and Dickinson, Matthew and Johnson, Claire and Mitchell, Thomas and Place, Emma and Reyher, Kristen K.},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.i408},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Veterinary Medicine, Abomasum/surgery, Animals, cattle, Clinical Decision-Making/*methods, Evidence-Based Medicine/*organization \& administration, Female, Humans},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {118--119},
    Pmid = {26823311},
    Title = {Clinical {Decision} {Making}.},
    Volume = {178},
    Year = {2016},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.i408}}

2015

  • [DOI] Kelley, Maureen, Cyan James, Stephanie Alessi Kraft, Diane Korngiebel, Isabelle Wijangco, Emily Rosenthal, Steven Joffe, Mildred K. Cho, Benjamin Wilfond, and Sandra Soo-Jin Lee. “Patient perspectives on the learning health system: the importance of trust and shared decision making..” Am j bioeth 15.9 (2015): 4-17. [Bibtex]
    @article{Kelley:2015aa,
    Abstract = {We conducted focus groups to assess patient attitudes toward research on medical practices in the context of usual care. We found that patients focus on the implications of this research for their relationship with and trust in their physicians. Patients view research on medical practices as separate from usual care, demanding dissemination of information and in most cases, individual consent. Patients expect information about this research to come through their physician, whom they rely on to identify and filter associated risks. In general, patients support this research, but worry that participation in research involving randomization may undermine individualized care that acknowledges their unique medical histories. These findings suggest the need for public education on variation in practice among physicians and the need for a collaborative approach to the governance of research on medical practices that addresses core values of trust, transparency, and partnership.},
    Address = {a University of Oxford.},
    Author = {Kelley, Maureen and James, Cyan and Alessi Kraft, Stephanie and Korngiebel, Diane and Wijangco, Isabelle and Rosenthal, Emily and Joffe, Steven and Cho, Mildred K and Wilfond, Benjamin and Lee, Sandra Soo-Jin},
    Cin = {Am J Bioeth. 2016;16(2):W7-9. PMID: 26832115; Am J Bioeth. 2015;15(9):32-3. PMID: 26305749; Am J Bioeth. 2015;15(9):28-30. PMID: 26305747; Am J Bioeth. 2015;15(9):25-6. PMID: 26305745; Am J Bioeth. 2015;15(9):18-20. PMID: 26305742; Am J Bioeth. 2015;15(9):22-4. PMID: 26305744; Am J Bioeth. 2015;15(9):30-2. PMID: 26305748; Am J Bioeth. 2015;15(9):27-8. PMID: 26305746},
    Crdt = {2015/08/26 06:00},
    Da = {20150826},
    Date = {2015},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20170110},
    Doi = {10.1080/15265161.2015.1062163},
    Edat = {2015/08/26 06:00},
    Gr = {UL1 TR000423/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States; UL1 TR001085/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States; UL1 TR000423-07S1/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States},
    Issn = {1536-0075 (Electronic); 1526-5161 (Linking)},
    Jid = {100898738},
    Journal = {Am J Bioeth},
    Jt = {The American journal of bioethics : AJOB},
    Keywords = {learning health system; randomization; research ethics; shared decision making; trust},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1080/15265161.2015.1062163 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20170719},
    Mh = {Confounding Factors (Epidemiology); Cooperative Behavior; *Decision Making; Ethics, Research; Focus Groups; Humans; Information Dissemination; *Informed Consent/ethics; *Learning; Medical Records; *Patient Participation; *Personal Autonomy; *Physician-Patient Relations/ethics; *Precision Medicine/ethics; Qualitative Research; *Random Allocation; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/*ethics; *Trust},
    Mhda = {2017/01/11 06:00},
    Mid = {NIHMS756709},
    Number = {9},
    Oid = {NLM: NIHMS756709; NLM: PMC4821628},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {4--17},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmc = {PMC4821628},
    Pmid = {26305741},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
    Sb = {E; IM},
    Source = {Am J Bioeth. 2015;15(9):4-17. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2015.1062163. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Patient Perspectives on the Learning Health System: The Importance of Trust and Shared Decision Making.},
    Volume = {15},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15265161.2015.1062163}}
  • [DOI] Friedman, Charles, Joshua Rubin, Jeffrey Brown, Melinda Buntin, Milton Corn, Lynn Etheredge, Carl Gunter, Mark Musen, Richard Platt, William Stead, Kevin Sullivan, and Douglas Van Houweling. “Toward a science of learning systems: a research agenda for the high-functioning learning health system..” J am med inform assoc 22.1 (2015): 43-50. [Bibtex]
    @article{Friedman:2015aa,
    Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: The capability to share data, and harness its potential to generate knowledge rapidly and inform decisions, can have transformative effects that improve health. The infrastructure to achieve this goal at scale--marrying technology, process, and policy--is commonly referred to as the Learning Health System (LHS). Achieving an LHS raises numerous scientific challenges. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The National Science Foundation convened an invitational workshop to identify the fundamental scientific and engineering research challenges to achieving a national-scale LHS. The workshop was planned by a 12-member committee and ultimately engaged 45 prominent researchers spanning multiple disciplines over 2 days in Washington, DC on 11-12 April 2013. RESULTS: The workshop participants collectively identified 106 research questions organized around four system-level requirements that a high-functioning LHS must satisfy. The workshop participants also identified a new cross-disciplinary integrative science of cyber-social ecosystems that will be required to address these challenges. CONCLUSIONS: The intellectual merit and potential broad impacts of the innovations that will be driven by investments in an LHS are of great potential significance. The specific research questions that emerged from the workshop, alongside the potential for diverse communities to assemble to address them through a 'new science of learning systems', create an important agenda for informatics and related disciplines.},
    Address = {University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.},
    Address1 = {University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.},
    Address10 = {University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.},
    Address11 = {University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.},
    Address2 = {Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.},
    Address3 = {Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.},
    Address4 = {National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.},
    Address5 = {George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.},
    Address6 = {University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA.},
    Address7 = {Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.},
    Address8 = {Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.},
    Address9 = {Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.},
    Author = {Friedman, Charles and Rubin, Joshua and Brown, Jeffrey and Buntin, Melinda and Corn, Milton and Etheredge, Lynn and Gunter, Carl and Musen, Mark and Platt, Richard and Stead, William and Sullivan, Kevin and Van Houweling, Douglas},
    Copyright = {(c) The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.},
    Crdt = {2014/10/25 06:00},
    Da = {20150123},
    Date = {2015 Jan},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20150518},
    Dep = {20141023},
    Doi = {10.1136/amiajnl-2014-002977},
    Edat = {2014/10/25 06:00},
    Issn = {1527-974X (Electronic); 1067-5027 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9430800},
    Journal = {J Am Med Inform Assoc},
    Jt = {Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association : JAMIA},
    Keywords = {learning health system; population health; research agenda; system science},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1136/amiajnl-2014-002977 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20160101},
    Mh = {Computer Security; *Databases as Topic; *Delivery of Health Care, Integrated; *Information Dissemination; Information Systems/*organization \& administration; Medical Records Systems, Computerized/organization \& administration; United States},
    Mhda = {2015/05/20 06:00},
    Month = {Jan},
    Number = {1},
    Oid = {NLM: PMC4433378},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {43--50},
    Pii = {amiajnl-2014-002977},
    Pl = {England},
    Pmc = {PMC4433378},
    Pmid = {25342177},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Congresses; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2015 Jan;22(1):43-50. doi: 10.1136/amiajnl-2014-002977. Epub 2014 Oct 23. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Toward a science of learning systems: a research agenda for the high-functioning Learning Health System.},
    Volume = {22},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/amiajnl-2014-002977}}
  • [DOI] “EBVM: application in everyday practice..” The veterinary record 177.24 (2015): 614. [Bibtex]
    @article{_ebvm:_2015,
    Abstract = {Essential tools to help practitioners integrate evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) into everyday practice were discussed recently at a 'skills day' organised by RCVS Knowledge. Kristy Ebanks reports.},
    Copyright = {British Veterinary Association.},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h5914},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Congresses as Topic, Evidence-Based Medicine/*organization \& administration, Great Britain, Humans, Societies, Medical, Veterinary Medicine/*organization \& administration},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = dec,
    Number = {24},
    Pages = {614},
    Pmid = {26679911},
    Title = {{EBVM}: application in everyday practice.},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h5914}}
  • [DOI] “Promoting evidence-based veterinary medicine..” The veterinary record 177.16 (2015): 410. [Bibtex]
    @article{_promoting_2015,
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h5599},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Schools, Veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine/*organization \& administration, Great Britain, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/*organization \& administration},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Number = {16},
    Pages = {410},
    Pmid = {26494891},
    Title = {Promoting evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h5599}}
  • [DOI] Reeve-Johnson, Lloyd. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine..” The veterinary record 177.15 (2015): 398. [Bibtex]
    @article{reeve-johnson_evidence-based_2015,
    Author = {Reeve-Johnson, Lloyd},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h5487},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine/*ethics, Veterinary Medicine/*ethics},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Number = {15},
    Pages = {398},
    Pmid = {26475906},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h5487}}
  • [DOI] Alkoff, Rose. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine..” The veterinary record 177.12 (2015): 320. [Bibtex]
    @article{alkoff_evidence-based_2015,
    Author = {Alkoff, Rose},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h5121},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine/*ethics, Veterinary Medicine/*ethics},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Number = {12},
    Pages = {320},
    Pmid = {26405133},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h5121}}
  • [DOI] Turner, Stuart W. and Nick Royle. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine..” The veterinary record 177.11 (2015): 293-294. [Bibtex]
    @article{turner_evidence-based_2015,
    Author = {Turner, Stuart W. and Royle, Nick},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h4957},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine/*ethics, Veterinary Medicine/*ethics},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Number = {11},
    Pages = {293--294},
    Pmid = {26385150},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h4957}}
  • [DOI] Reeve-Johnson, Lloyd. “Evidence-based medicine..” The veterinary record 177.10 (2015): 266. [Bibtex]
    @article{reeve-johnson_evidence-based_2015-1,
    Author = {Reeve-Johnson, Lloyd},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h4836},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine/*ethics, Veterinary Medicine/*ethics},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Number = {10},
    Pages = {266},
    Pmid = {26358455},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine.},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h4836}}
  • [DOI] Whitehead, Martin. “Ethics of EBVM..” The veterinary record 177.9 (2015): 237-238. [Bibtex]
    @article{whitehead_ethics_2015,
    Author = {Whitehead, Martin},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h4704},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine/*ethics, Veterinary Medicine/*ethics},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Number = {9},
    Pages = {237--238},
    Pmid = {26338939},
    Title = {Ethics of {EBVM}.},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h4704}}
  • [DOI] Mills, David. “Is EBVM ethical?.” The veterinary record 177.7 (2015): 181-182. [Bibtex]
    @article{mills_is_2015,
    Author = {Mills, David},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h4223},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Animal Welfare, Evidence-Based Medicine/*ethics, Veterinary Medicine/*ethics},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {181--182},
    Pmid = {26273010},
    Title = {Is {EBVM} ethical?},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h4223}}
  • [DOI] Nielsen, T. D., R. S. Dean, A. Massey, and M. L. Brennan. “Survey of the UK veterinary profession 2: sources of information used by veterinarians..” The veterinary record 177.7 (2015): 172. [Bibtex]
    @article{nielsen_survey_2015,
    Abstract = {Access to the most up-to-date evidence is an important cornerstone for veterinarians attempting to practice in an evidence-based manner; therefore, an understanding of what and how information is accessed is vital. The aim of this study was to identify what resources the UK veterinary profession access and regard as most useful. Based on questionnaires received from veterinarians, the Veterinary Times was nominated as most often read journal or magazine by respondents (n=3572, 79 per cent). In Practice (n=3224, 82 per cent) and the Veterinary Record (n=165, 34 per cent) were seen as most useful by clinicians, and non-clinicians, respectively. Google was the most often nominated electronic resource by all respondents (n=3076, 71 per cent), with Google (n=459, 23 per cent) and PubMed (n=60, 17 per cent) seen as most useful by clinicians and non-clinicians, respectively. The abstract and conclusion sections were the most read parts of scientific manuscripts nominated by all respondents. When looking for assistance with difficult cases, colleagues were the common information choice for clinicians. Different sections of the veterinary profession access information, and deem resources useful, in different ways. Access to good quality evidence is important for the practice of evidence-based veterinary medicine, and therefore, researchers should think about disseminating their findings in a targeted way for optimal use by the profession.},
    Author = {Nielsen, T. D. and Dean, R. S. and Massey, A. and Brennan, M. L.},
    Copyright = {British Veterinary Association.},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.103068},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Evidence-Based Medicine, *Information Seeking Behavior, *Veterinary Medicine, Animals, Attitude of Health Personnel, Clinical practice, epidemiology, Evidence-Based Medicine, Great Britain, Humans, Information Management, Patient Education as Topic, Surveys, Surveys and Questionnaires, Veterinarians/*psychology, veterinary profession},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {172},
    Pmcid = {PMC4552931},
    Pmid = {26246397},
    Title = {Survey of the {UK} veterinary profession 2: sources of information used by veterinarians.},
    Volume = {177},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.103068}}
  • [DOI] “Grant for an online resource to support evidence-based veterinary medicine..” The veterinary record 176.22 (2015): 558. [Bibtex]
    @article{_grant_2015,
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h2881},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Financing, Organized, Computer-Assisted Instruction/*economics, Education, Veterinary/*economics, Evidence-Based Medicine/*education, Great Britain, Humans, Societies, Medical, Veterinary Medicine/*organization \& administration},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = may,
    Number = {22},
    Pages = {558},
    Pmid = {26025704},
    Title = {Grant for an online resource to support evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {176},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h2881}}
  • [DOI] Dean, Rachel, Kevin Mackway-Jones, Kathryn Wareham, Douglas Grindlay, and Marnie Brennan. “BestBETs for Vets: a way to improve the odds of delivering high-quality care..” The veterinary record 176.14 (2015): 354-356. [Bibtex]
    @article{dean_bestbets_2015,
    Author = {Dean, Rachel and Mackway-Jones, Kevin and Wareham, Kathryn and Grindlay, Douglas and Brennan, Marnie},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h1593},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Evidence-Based Medicine, *Quality of Health Care, *Veterinarians, Animals, Humans, Practice Patterns, Physicians'/*standards, Veterinary Medicine/*standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Number = {14},
    Pages = {354--356},
    Pmid = {25837948},
    Title = {{BestBETs} for {Vets}: a way to improve the odds of delivering high-quality care.},
    Volume = {176},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h1593}}
  • [DOI] “RCVS knowledge: Toolkits to support evidence-based practice..” The veterinary record 176.14 (2015): 346. [Bibtex]
    @article{_rcvs_2015,
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.h1786},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Knowledge, *Practice Guidelines as Topic, *Societies, Medical, Evidence-Based Medicine/*organization \& administration, Great Britain, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/*organization \& administration},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Number = {14},
    Pages = {346},
    Pmid = {25837943},
    Title = {{RCVS} knowledge: {Toolkits} to support evidence-based practice.},
    Volume = {176},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.h1786}}
  • [DOI] Kerbyson, N.. “Recent initiatives in evidence-based veterinary medicine..” Equine veterinary journal 47.5 (2015): 503-504. [Bibtex]
    @article{kerbyson_recent_2015,
    Author = {Kerbyson, N.},
    Doi = {10.1111/evj.12425},
    Issn = {2042-3306 0425-1644},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Evidence-Based Medicine/*organization \& administration/standards, Great Britain, Societies, Scientific/organization \& administration/standards, Veterinary Medicine/*standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {503--504},
    Pmid = {25790127},
    Title = {Recent initiatives in evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {47},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evj.12425}}
  • [DOI] Dean, Rachel. “Involving pet owners in setting priorities for research..” The veterinary record 176.3 (2015): 62. [Bibtex]
    @article{dean_involving_2015,
    Author = {Dean, Rachel},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.g7783},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Ownership, *Pets, Animals, Cat Diseases/*therapy, Cats, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/therapy/*veterinary, Research/*organization \& administration, Treatment Outcome},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {62},
    Pmid = {25598461},
    Title = {Involving pet owners in setting priorities for research.},
    Volume = {176},
    Year = {2015},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.g7783}}

2014

  • [DOI] Etheredge, Lynn M.. “Rapid learning: a breakthrough agenda..” Health aff (millwood) 33.7 (2014): 1155-1162. [Bibtex]
    @article{Etheredge:2014aa,
    Abstract = {A "rapid-learning health system" was proposed in a 2007 thematic issue of Health Affairs. The system was envisioned as one that uses evidence-based medicine to quickly determine the best possible treatments for patients. It does so by drawing on electronic health records and the power of big data to access large volumes of information from a variety of sources at high speed. The foundation for a rapid-learning health system was laid during 2007-13 by workshops, policy papers, large public investments in databases and research programs, and developing learning systems. Challenges now include implementing a new clinical research system with several hundred million patients, modernizing clinical trials and registries, devising and funding research on national priorities, and analyzing genetic and other factors that influence diseases and responses to treatment. Next steps also should aim to improve comparative effectiveness research; build on investments in health information technology to standardize handling of genetic information and support information exchange through apps and software modules; and develop new tools, data, and information for clinical decision support. Further advances will require commitment, leadership, and public-private and global collaboration.},
    Address = {Lynn M. Etheredge (lyneth1{\char64}mac.com) is director of the Rapid Learning Project, in Chevy Chase, Maryland.},
    Author = {Etheredge, Lynn M},
    Copyright = {Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.},
    Crdt = {2014/07/10 06:00},
    Da = {20140709},
    Date = {2014 Jul},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20160706},
    Doi = {10.1377/hlthaff.2014.0043},
    Edat = {2014/07/10 06:00},
    Ein = {Health Aff (Millwood). 2014 Sep;33(9):1703},
    Issn = {1544-5208 (Electronic); 0278-2715 (Linking)},
    Jid = {8303128},
    Journal = {Health Aff (Millwood)},
    Jt = {Health affairs (Project Hope)},
    Keywords = {Evidence-Based Medicine; Information Technology; Public Health; Quality Of Care; Research And Technology},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1377/hlthaff.2014.0043 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20140709},
    Mh = {Biomedical Research; Datasets as Topic; *Decision Support Systems, Clinical; Delivery of Health Care; *Electronic Health Records; Evidence-Based Medicine/*methods; Health Policy; Humans; Learning; Medical Informatics; *Quality of Health Care; United States},
    Mhda = {2016/07/07 06:00},
    Month = {Jul},
    Number = {7},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {1155--1162},
    Pii = {33/7/1155},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {25006141},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Health Aff (Millwood). 2014 Jul;33(7):1155-62. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2014.0043. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Rapid learning: a breakthrough agenda.},
    Volume = {33},
    Year = {2014},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2014.0043}}
  • [DOI] Abernethy, Amy P.. “Demonstrating the learning health system through practical use cases..” Pediatrics 134.1 (2014): 171-172. [Bibtex]
    @article{Abernethy:2014aa,
    Address = {Center for Learning Health Care, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina amy.abernethy@duke.edu.},
    Author = {Abernethy, Amy P},
    Con = {Pediatrics. 2014 Jul;134(1):37-44. PMID: 24935993},
    Crdt = {2014/06/18 06:00},
    Da = {20140702},
    Date = {2014 Jul},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20140904},
    Dep = {20140616},
    Doi = {10.1542/peds.2014-1182},
    Edat = {2014/06/18 06:00},
    Issn = {1098-4275 (Electronic); 0031-4005 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0376422},
    Journal = {Pediatrics},
    Jt = {Pediatrics},
    Keywords = {electronic health record; health information technology},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1542/peds.2014-1182 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20140702},
    Mh = {Crohn Disease/*drug therapy; Female; Humans; Male; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/*antagonists \& inhibitors},
    Mhda = {2014/09/05 06:00},
    Month = {Jul},
    Number = {1},
    Oto = {NOTNLM},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {171--172},
    Pii = {peds.2014-1182},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {24935998},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Comment; Journal Article},
    Rn = {0 (Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha); Pediatric Crohn's disease},
    Sb = {AIM; IM},
    Source = {Pediatrics. 2014 Jul;134(1):171-2. doi: 10.1542/peds.2014-1182. Epub 2014 Jun 16. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Demonstrating the learning health system through practical use cases.},
    Volume = {134},
    Year = {2014},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-1182}}
  • Sargeant, J. M. and A. M. O’Connor. “Introduction to Systematic Reviews in Animal Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine.” Zoonoses and public health 61 (2014): 3-9. [Bibtex]
    @article{sargeant_introduction_2014,
    Author = {Sargeant, J M and O'Connor, A M},
    Journal = {Zoonoses and Public Health},
    Pages = {3--9},
    Title = {Introduction to {Systematic} {Reviews} in {Animal} {Agriculture} and {Veterinary} {Medicine}},
    Volume = {61},
    Year = {2014}}
  • Sargeant, J. M., D. F. Kelton, and A. M. O’Connor. “Study Designs and Systematic Reviews of Interventions: Building Evidence Across Study Designs.” Zoonoses and public health 61 (2014): 10-17. [Bibtex]
    @article{sargeant_study_2014,
    Author = {Sargeant, J M and Kelton, D F and O'Connor, A M},
    Journal = {Zoonoses and Public Health},
    Pages = {10--17},
    Title = {Study {Designs} and {Systematic} {Reviews} of {Interventions}: {Building} {Evidence} {Across} {Study} {Designs}},
    Volume = {61},
    Year = {2014}}
  • Sargeant, J. M. and A. M. O’Connor. “Conducting Systematic Reviews of Intervention Questions II: Relevance Screening, Data Extraction, Assessing Risk of Bias, Presenting the Results and Interpreting the Findings.” Zoonoses and public health 61 (2014): 39-51. [Bibtex]
    @article{sargeant_conducting_2014,
    Author = {Sargeant, J M and O'Connor, A M},
    Journal = {Zoonoses and Public Health},
    Pages = {39--51},
    Title = {Conducting {Systematic} {Reviews} of {Intervention} {Questions} {II}: {Relevance} {Screening}, {Data} {Extraction}, {Assessing} {Risk} of {Bias}, {Presenting} the {Results} and {Interpreting} the {Findings}},
    Volume = {61},
    Year = {2014}}
  • O’Connor, A. M., J. M. Sargeant, and C. Wang. “Conducting Systematic Reviews of Intervention Questions III: Synthesizing Data from Intervention Studies Using Meta-Analysis.” Zoonoses and public health 61 (2014): 52-63. [Bibtex]
    @article{oconnor_conducting_2014,
    Author = {O'Connor, A M and Sargeant, J M and Wang, C},
    Journal = {Zoonoses and Public Health},
    Pages = {52--63},
    Title = {Conducting {Systematic} {Reviews} of {Intervention} {Questions} {III}: {Synthesizing} {Data} from {Intervention} {Studies} {Using} {Meta}-{Analysis}},
    Volume = {61},
    Year = {2014}}
  • O’Connor, A. M., K. M. Anderson, C. K. Goodell, and J. M. Sargeant. “Conducting Systematic Reviews of Intervention Questions I: Writing the Review Protocol, Formulating the Question and Searching the Literature.” Zoonoses and public health 61 (2014): 28-38. [Bibtex]
    @article{oconnor_conducting_2014-1,
    Author = {O'Connor, A M and Anderson, K M and Goodell, C K and Sargeant, J M},
    Journal = {Zoonoses and Public Health},
    Pages = {28--38},
    Title = {Conducting {Systematic} {Reviews} of {Intervention} {Questions} {I}: {Writing} the {Review} {Protocol}, {Formulating} the {Question} and {Searching} the {Literature}},
    Volume = {61},
    Year = {2014}}
  • Sargeant, J. M., D. F. Kelton, and A. M. O’Connor. “Randomized Controlled Trials and Challenge Trials: Design and Criterion for Validity.” Zoonoses and public health 61 (2014): 18-27. [Bibtex]
    @article{sargeant_randomized_2014,
    Author = {Sargeant, J M and Kelton, D F and O'Connor, A M},
    Journal = {Zoonoses and Public Health},
    Pages = {18--27},
    Title = {Randomized {Controlled} {Trials} and {Challenge} {Trials}: {Design} and {Criterion} for {Validity}},
    Volume = {61},
    Year = {2014}}
  • [DOI] Feetham, L. and E. Raffan. “Better research reporting for better patient care..” The veterinary record 175.21 (2014): 535-536. [Bibtex]
    @article{feetham_better_2014,
    Author = {Feetham, L. and Raffan, E.},
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.g7167},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Biomedical Research, Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Guidelines as Topic, Journalism, Medical/*standards, Patient Care/*standards, Veterinary Medicine/*standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Number = {21},
    Pages = {535--536},
    Pmid = {25431384},
    Title = {Better research reporting for better patient care.},
    Volume = {175},
    Year = {2014},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.g7167}}
  • [DOI] “Making evidence-based veterinary medicine work for clinicians..” The veterinary record 175.20 (2014): 499. [Bibtex]
    @article{_making_2014,
    Doi = {10.1136/vr.g6949},
    Issn = {2042-7670 0042-4900},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {*Attitude of Health Personnel, Animals, Congresses as Topic, Evidence-Based Medicine/*organization \& administration, Humans, Veterinarians/*psychology, Veterinary Medicine/*organization \& administration},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Number = {20},
    Pages = {499},
    Pmid = {25413819},
    Title = {Making evidence-based veterinary medicine work for clinicians.},
    Volume = {175},
    Year = {2014},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.g6949}}
  • [DOI] Arlt, S. P. and W. Heuwieser. “Evidence-based Medicine in Animal Reproduction..” Reproduction in domestic animals = zuchthygiene 49 Suppl 3 (2014): 11-15. [Bibtex]
    @article{arlt_evidence-based_2014,
    Abstract = {With new knowledge being generated and published daily, the importance of evidence-based approaches in veterinary medicine is obvious. Clinicians must stay current or risk making poor decisions that clients may challenge. Especially in animal reproduction, several new substances and procedures to diagnose or treat reproductive disorders have been introduced in the last years. On the other hand, a closer look at the quality of published literature on animal reproduction reveals major deficits in methodology and reporting of many clinical trials. We strongly recommend systematically assessing the quality of scientific information when reading journal papers before using the given information in practice. The aim of evidence-based medicine (EBM) is to base the decisions in the practice of medicine on valid, clinically relevant research data. Therefore, we suggest that students should become familiar with the concepts of evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) at the beginning of their veterinary education. Concepts and supporting tools such as checklists for literature assessment have been developed and validated. The purpose of this article is to review and discuss the importance of incorporating EBVM in animal reproduction. The need for further research that produces strong evidence in different fields of animal reproduction and better reporting of relevant study information is obvious.},
    Author = {Arlt, S. P. and Heuwieser, W.},
    Copyright = {(c) 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.},
    Doi = {10.1111/rda.12323},
    Issn = {1439-0531 0936-6768},
    Journal = {Reproduction in domestic animals = Zuchthygiene},
    Keywords = {*Evidence-Based Medicine, *Reproduction, Animals, Biomedical Research, Education, Veterinary, Female, Male, Publishing, Veterinary Medicine/*methods},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Pages = {11--15},
    Pmid = {25220744},
    Title = {Evidence-based {Medicine} in {Animal} {Reproduction}.},
    Volume = {49 Suppl 3},
    Year = {2014},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rda.12323}}
  • [DOI] Raditic, Donna M. and Joseph W. Bartges. “Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology..” The veterinary clinics of north america. small animal practice 44.5 (2014): 831-853. [Bibtex]
    @article{raditic_evidence-based_2014,
    Abstract = {Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology.},
    Author = {Raditic, Donna M. and Bartges, Joseph W.},
    Copyright = {Published by Elsevier Inc.},
    Doi = {10.1016/j.cvsm.2014.06.002},
    Issn = {1878-1306 0195-5616},
    Journal = {The Veterinary clinics of North America. Small animal practice},
    Keywords = {Acupuncture Therapy/veterinary, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use, Cancer, complementary and alternative medicine, Dietary Supplements, Dietary Supplements/analysis, Dog Diseases/*therapy, Dogs, Evidence-Based Medicine/*trends, Herbal Medicine, Herbs, Integrative medicine, Neoplasia, Neoplasms/therapy/*veterinary, Nutraceutical, Veterinary Medicine/*trends, Veterinary oncology},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {831--853},
    Pmid = {25174902},
    Title = {Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.},
    Volume = {44},
    Year = {2014},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cvsm.2014.06.002}}
  • Torjesen, Ingrid. “Researchers commit to greater openness on research involving animals in the UK..” Bmj (clinical research ed.) 348 (2014): g3305. [Bibtex]
    @article{torjesen_researchers_2014,
    Author = {Torjesen, Ingrid},
    Issn = {1756-1833 0959-535X},
    Journal = {BMJ (Clinical research ed.)},
    Keywords = {*Animals, Laboratory, *Biomedical Research/ethics/standards, Animal Experimentation/ethics/*standards, Animals, Animal Welfare/*standards, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Industry, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Research Personnel/*ethics/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Pages = {g3305},
    Pmid = {25134140},
    Title = {Researchers commit to greater openness on research involving animals in the {UK}.},
    Volume = {348},
    Year = {2014}}
  • Cochrane, Brett and Kit Byatt. “A paradigm shift is needed to move biomedical research forward..” Bmj (clinical research ed.) 349 (2014): g4267. [Bibtex]
    @article{cochrane_paradigm_2014,
    Author = {Cochrane, Brett and Byatt, Kit},
    Issn = {1756-1833 0959-535X},
    Journal = {BMJ (Clinical research ed.)},
    Keywords = {*Evidence-Based Medicine, Animal Experimentation/*standards, Animals, Biomedical Research/*methods},
    Language = {eng},
    Pages = {g4267},
    Pmid = {25008230},
    Title = {A paradigm shift is needed to move biomedical research forward.},
    Volume = {349},
    Year = {2014}}
  • [DOI] Lam, Juleen, Erica Koustas, Patrice Sutton, Paula I. Johnson, Dylan S. Atchley, Saunak Sen, Karen A. Robinson, Daniel A. Axelrad, and Tracey J. Woodruff. “The Navigation Guide – evidence-based medicine meets environmental health: integration of animal and human evidence for PFOA effects on fetal growth..” Environmental health perspectives 122.10 (2014): 1040-1051. [Bibtex]
    @article{lam_navigation_2014,
    Abstract = {BACKGROUND: The Navigation Guide is a novel systematic review method to synthesize scientific evidence and reach strength of evidence conclusions for environmental health decision making. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to integrate scientific findings from human and nonhuman studies to determine the overall strength of evidence for the question "Does developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) affect fetal growth in humans?" METHODS: We developed and applied prespecified criteria to systematically and transparently a) rate the quality of the scientific evidence as "high," "moderate," or "low"; b) rate the strength of the human and nonhuman evidence separately as "sufficient," "limited," "moderate," or "evidence of lack of toxicity"; and c) integrate the strength of the human and nonhuman evidence ratings into a strength of the evidence conclusion. RESULTS: We identified 18 epidemiology studies and 21 animal toxicology studies relevant to our study question. We rated both the human and nonhuman mammalian evidence as "moderate" quality and "sufficient" strength. Integration of these evidence ratings produced a final strength of evidence rating in which review authors concluded that PFOA is "known to be toxic" to human reproduction and development based on sufficient evidence of decreased fetal growth in both human and nonhuman mammalian species. CONCLUSION: We concluded that developmental exposure to PFOA adversely affects human health based on sufficient evidence of decreased fetal growth in both human and nonhuman mammalian species. The results of this case study demonstrate the application of a systematic and transparent methodology, via the Navigation Guide, for reaching strength of evidence conclusions in environmental health.},
    Author = {Lam, Juleen and Koustas, Erica and Sutton, Patrice and Johnson, Paula I. and Atchley, Dylan S. and Sen, Saunak and Robinson, Karen A. and Axelrad, Daniel A. and Woodruff, Tracey J.},
    Doi = {10.1289/ehp.1307923},
    Issn = {1552-9924 0091-6765},
    Journal = {Environmental health perspectives},
    Keywords = {Animals, Birth Weight/drug effects, Caprylates/*toxicity, Environmental Health, Environmental Pollutants/*toxicity, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Fetal Development/*drug effects, Fluorocarbons/*toxicity, Humans, Maternal Exposure/*adverse effects, Pregnancy},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Number = {10},
    Pages = {1040--1051},
    Pmcid = {PMC4181930},
    Pmid = {24968389},
    Title = {The {Navigation} {Guide} - evidence-based medicine meets environmental health: integration of animal and human evidence for {PFOA} effects on fetal growth.},
    Volume = {122},
    Year = {2014},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307923}}

2013

  • on Value, Roundtable, Care Science-Driven Health, Forum on Drug Discovery Development, Translation, Policy Board on Health Sciences, and Medicine Institute of. (2013). [Bibtex]
    @article{Value:2013aa,
    Abstract = {Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are often referred to as the "gold standard" of clinical research. However, in its current state, the U.S. clinical trials enterprise faces substantial challenges to the efficient and effective conduct of research. Streamlined approaches to RCTs, such as large simple trials (LSTs), may provide opportunities for progress on these challenges. Clinical trials support the development of new medical products and the evaluation of existing products by generating knowledge about safety and efficacy in pre- and post-marketing settings and serve to inform medical decision making and medical product development. Although well-designed and -implemented clinical trials can provide robust evidence, a gap exists between the evidence needs of a continuously learning health system, in which all medical decisions are based on the best available evidence, and the reality, in which the generation of timely and practical evidence faces significant barriers. Large Simple Trials and Knowledge Generation in a Learning Health System is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care and the Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation. Experts from a wide range of disciplines--including health information technology, research funding, clinical research methods, statistics, patients, product development, medical product regulation, and clinical outcomes research--met to marshal a better understanding of the issues, options, and approaches to accelerating the use of LSTs. This publication summarizes discussions on the potential of LSTs to improve the speed and practicality of knowledge generation for medical decision making and medical product development, including efficacy and effectiveness assessments, in a continuously learning health system. Large Simple Trials and Knowledge Generation in a Learning Health System explores acceleration of the use of LSTs to improve the speed and practicality of knowledge generation for medical decision making and medical product development; considers the concepts of LST design, examples of successful LSTs, the relative advantages of LSTs, and the infrastructure needed to build LST capacity as a routine function of care; identifies structural, cultural, and regulatory barriers hindering the development of an enhanced LST capacity; discusses needs and strategies in building public demand for and participation in LSTs; and considers near-term strategies for accelerating progress in the uptake of LSTs in the United States.},
    Aid = {10.17226/18400 {$[$}doi{$]$} },
    Author = {Roundtable on Value and Science-Driven Health, Care and Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation and Board on Health Sciences, Policy and Institute of, Medicine},
    Bookaccession = {NBK201274},
    Bti = {Large Simple Trials and Knowledge Generation in a Learning Health System: Workshop Summary},
    Cdat = {2014/05/16 06:00},
    Copyright = {Copyright 2013 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.},
    Cti = {The National Academies Collection: Reports funded by National Institutes of Health},
    Da = {20140516},
    Date = {2013 Dec 05},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Edat = {2014/05/16 06:00},
    Gr = {HHSN263201200074I/NIH HHS/United States; N01 OD042139/NIH HHS/United States},
    Isbn = {9780309289115; 0309289114},
    Language = {eng},
    Mhda = {2014/05/16 06:00},
    Month = {Dec},
    Pb = {National Academies Press (US)},
    Pl = {Washington (DC)},
    Pmid = {24830060},
    Pt = {Review; Book},
    Status = {Publisher},
    Year = {2013}}
  • [DOI] Friedman, Charles and Michael Rigby. “Conceptualising and creating a global learning health system..” Int j med inform 82.4 (2013): e63-71. [Bibtex]
    @article{Friedman:2013aa,
    Abstract = {In any country the health sector is important in terms of human wellbeing and large in terms of economics. The health sector might therefore be expected to be a finely tuned enterprise, utilising corporate knowledge in a constant process of critically reviewing and improving its activities and processes. However, this is seldom the case. Health systems and practice are highly variable and lag behind research discovery. This contrasts strongly with commercial bodies, and particularly service industries, where the concept of the learning organisation is strongly seen as the key to optimisation. A learning organisation accesses for analytic purposes operational data, which though captured and recorded for day-to-day transactions at the customer level, become also the basis of understanding changes in both demand and delivery process. In health care, the concept of the learning organisation is well grounded ethically. Anything which can improve health, including understanding of optimal care delivery processes and how to improve longer term outcomes, should be seized upon to drive service improvement - but currently this occurs haphazardly. The limitations of paper-based systems, priority given to digitalization of financial transactions, concerns about electronic data insecurity, and other factors have inhibited progress towards organisational learning at a national scale. But in recent years, new means of capturing, managing, and exchanging data have created new opportunities, while ever increasing pressures on health systems have produced strengthened incentive. In the United States, the current policy and investment impetus to electronic health records and concomitantly their 'meaningful use' create opportunities to build the foundations for data re-use for corporate learning - and thus for societal gain. In Europe and other settings there are islands of innovation, but not yet a coherent culture or impetus to build foundations for a learning health system. This paper considers how to move forward, in the light of the urgent need for smarter health systems where experience becomes the fuel for rapid improvement, and best practices are routinely identified and applied.},
    Address = {School of Information and Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.},
    Author = {Friedman, Charles and Rigby, Michael},
    Copyright = {Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
    Crdt = {2012/06/22 06:00},
    Da = {20130320},
    Date = {2013 Apr},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20130910},
    Dep = {20120618},
    Doi = {10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2012.05.010},
    Edat = {2012/06/22 06:00},
    Issn = {1872-8243 (Electronic); 1386-5056 (Linking)},
    Jid = {9711057},
    Journal = {Int J Med Inform},
    Jt = {International journal of medical informatics},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2012.05.010 {$[$}doi{$]$}; S1386-5056(12)00104-9 {$[$}pii{$]$}},
    Lr = {20130320},
    Mh = {Delivery of Health Care/*organization \& administration; Europe; *Internationality; *Learning; United States},
    Mhda = {2013/09/11 06:00},
    Month = {Apr},
    Number = {4},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {e63-71},
    Phst = {2011/12/21 {$[$}received{$]$}; 2012/05/21 {$[$}revised{$]$}; 2012/05/21 {$[$}accepted{$]$}},
    Pii = {S1386-5056(12)00104-9},
    Pl = {Ireland},
    Pmid = {22717661},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article},
    Sb = {IM},
    Source = {Int J Med Inform. 2013 Apr;82(4):e63-71. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2012.05.010. Epub 2012 Jun 18. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Conceptualising and creating a global learning health system.},
    Volume = {82},
    Year = {2013},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2012.05.010}}
  • Petrie, Aviva and Paul Watson. Statistics for Veterinary and Animal Science. John Wiley & Sons, 2013. [Bibtex]
    @book{petrie_statistics_2013,
    Author = {Petrie, Aviva and Watson, Paul},
    Month = feb,
    Publisher = {John Wiley \& Sons},
    Title = {Statistics for {Veterinary} and {Animal} {Science}},
    Year = {2013}}

2012

  • [DOI] Greene, Sarah M., Robert J. Reid, and Eric B. Larson. “Implementing the learning health system: from concept to action..” Ann intern med 157.3 (2012): 207-210. [Bibtex]
    @article{Greene:2012aa,
    Abstract = {Clinicians and health systems are facing widespread challenges, including changes in care delivery, escalating health care costs, and the need to keep up with rapid scientific discovery. Reorganizing U.S. health care and changing its practices to render better, more affordable care requires transformation in how health systems generate and apply knowledge. The "rapid-learning health system"-posited as a conceptual strategy to spur such transformation-leverages recent developments in health information technology and a growing health data infrastructure to access and apply evidence in real time, while simultaneously drawing knowledge from real-world care-delivery processes to promote innovation and health system change on the basis of rigorous research. This article describes an evolving learning health system at Group Health Cooperative, the 6 phases characterizing its approach, and examples of organization-wide applications. This practical model promotes bidirectional discovery and an open mind at the system level, resulting in willingness to make changes on the basis of evidence that is both scientifically sound and practice-based. Rapid learning must be valued as a health system property to realize its full potential for knowledge generation and application.},
    Address = {Group Health Cooperative, 320 Westlake Avenue North, GHQ E2N, Seattle, WA 98109, USA. greene.sm@ghc.org},
    Author = {Greene, Sarah M and Reid, Robert J and Larson, Eric B},
    Crdt = {2012/08/08 06:00},
    Da = {20120807},
    Date = {2012 Aug 07},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20121012},
    Doi = {10.7326/0003-4819-157-3-201208070-00012},
    Edat = {2012/08/08 06:00},
    Issn = {1539-3704 (Electronic); 0003-4819 (Linking)},
    Jid = {0372351},
    Journal = {Ann Intern Med},
    Jt = {Annals of internal medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.7326/0003-4819-157-3-201208070-00012 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20120807},
    Mh = {Delivery of Health Care/*methods; Evidence-Based Practice; *Health Care Reform; Health Plan Implementation; Humans; Learning; Patient-Centered Care/*methods/standards; Quality of Health Care; United States},
    Mhda = {2012/10/13 06:00},
    Month = {Aug},
    Number = {3},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {207--210},
    Pii = {1305510},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {22868839},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
    Sb = {AIM; IM},
    Source = {Ann Intern Med. 2012 Aug 7;157(3):207-10. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-157-3-201208070-00012. },
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Implementing the learning health system: from concept to action.},
    Volume = {157},
    Year = {2012},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819-157-3-201208070-00012}}
  • Buczinski, Sebastien and Jean-Michel Vandeweerd. Evidence Based Veterinary Medicine for the Bovine Veterinarian, An Issue of Veterinary Clinics: Food Animal Practice. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012. [Bibtex]
    @book{buczinski_evidence_2012,
    Author = {Buczinski, Sebastien and Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel},
    Month = mar,
    Publisher = {Elsevier Health Sciences},
    Title = {Evidence {Based} {Veterinary} {Medicine} for the {Bovine} {Veterinarian}, {An} {Issue} of {Veterinary} {Clinics}: {Food} {Animal} {Practice}},
    Year = {2012}}
  • Vandeweerd, J. M., N. Kirschvink, and P. Clegg. “Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, obstacles and perspectives.” The veterinary \textbackslashldots (2012). [Bibtex]
    @article{vandeweerd_is_2012,
    Author = {Vandeweerd, J M and Kirschvink, N and Clegg, P},
    Journal = {The Veterinary {\textbackslash}ldots},
    Title = {Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? {History}, obstacles and perspectives},
    Year = {2012}}

2011

  • Alpi, Kristine M., Heidi A. Burnett, Sheila J. Bryant, and Katherine M. Anderson. “Connecting knowledge resources to the veterinary electronic health record: opportunities for learning at point of care.” Journal of veterinary medical education 38.2 (2011): 110-122. [Bibtex]
    @article{alpi_connecting_2011,
    Author = {Alpi, Kristine M and Burnett, Heidi A and Bryant, Sheila J and Anderson, Katherine M},
    Journal = {Journal of veterinary medical education},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {110--122},
    Title = {Connecting knowledge resources to the veterinary electronic health record: opportunities for learning at point of care},
    Volume = {38},
    Year = {2011}}

2010

  • [DOI] Friedman, Charles P., Adam K. Wong, and David Blumenthal. “Achieving a nationwide learning health system..” Sci transl med 2.57 (2010): 57cm29. [Bibtex]
    @article{Friedman:2010aa,
    Abstract = {We outline the fundamental properties of a highly participatory rapid learning system that can be developed in part from meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs). Future widespread adoption of EHRs will make increasing amounts of medical information available in computable form. Secured and trusted use of these data, beyond their original purpose of supporting the health care of individual patients, can speed the progression of knowledge from the laboratory bench to the patient's bedside and provide a cornerstone for health care reform.},
    Address = {Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC 20201, USA. charles.friedman@hhs.gov},
    Author = {Friedman, Charles P and Wong, Adam K and Blumenthal, David},
    Crdt = {2010/11/12 06:00},
    Da = {20101111},
    Date = {2010 Nov 10},
    Date-Added = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Date-Modified = {2017-10-08 02:33:01 +0000},
    Dcom = {20110301},
    Doi = {10.1126/scitranslmed.3001456},
    Edat = {2010/11/12 06:00},
    Issn = {1946-6242 (Electronic); 1946-6234 (Linking)},
    Jid = {101505086},
    Journal = {Sci Transl Med},
    Jt = {Science translational medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Lid = {10.1126/scitranslmed.3001456 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
    Lr = {20101111},
    Mh = {Delivery of Health Care/*organization \& administration; Learning; *Medical Records Systems, Computerized; Public Policy; United States},
    Mhda = {2011/03/02 06:00},
    Month = {Nov},
    Number = {57},
    Own = {NLM},
    Pages = {57cm29},
    Pii = {2/57/57cm29},
    Pl = {United States},
    Pmid = {21068440},
    Pst = {ppublish},
    Pt = {Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.},
    Sb = {IM},
    Status = {MEDLINE},
    Title = {Achieving a nationwide learning health system.},
    Volume = {2},
    Year = {2010},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.3001456}}
  • Fajt, V. R., Van A. M. House, and C. M. Honnas. “What is the evidence? In horses with septic bursitis for which the organism has not yet been identified, is IV regional perfusion with amikacin or cefotaxime likely to be effective?.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 236.6 (2010): 636-638. [Bibtex]
    @article{fajt_what_2010,
    Author = {Fajt, V. R. and House, A. M. Van and Honnas, C. M.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Amikacin/administration \& dosage/therapeutic use, Animal/diagnosis, Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration \& dosage/therapeutic use, Arthritis, Bursitis/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary, Cefotaxime/administration \& dosage/therapeutic use, Evidence-Based Practice, Female, Horse Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy, horses, Infectious/diagnosis/drug therapy/veterinary, Lameness},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {JID: 7503067; 0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 37517-28-5 (Amikacin); 63527-52-6 (Cefotaxime); ppublish},
    Number = {6},
    Pages = {636--638},
    Title = {What is the evidence? {In} horses with septic bursitis for which the organism has not yet been identified, is {IV} regional perfusion with amikacin or cefotaxime likely to be effective?},
    Volume = {236},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Hinchcliff, K. W. and S. P. DiBartola. “Quality matters: publishing in the era of CONSORT, REFLECT, and EBM.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 24.1 (2010): 8-9. [Bibtex]
    @article{hinchcliff_quality_2010,
    Author = {Hinchcliff, K. W. and DiBartola, S. P.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {JID: 8708660; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {8--9},
    Title = {Quality matters: publishing in the era of {CONSORT}, {REFLECT}, and {EBM}},
    Volume = {24},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Hooijmans, C. R., M. Leenaars, and M. Ritskes-Hoitinga. “A gold standard publication checklist to improve the quality of animal studies, to fully integrate the Three Rs, and to make systematic reviews more feasible.” Alternatives to laboratory animals : atla 38.2 (2010): 167-182. [Bibtex]
    @article{hooijmans_gold_2010,
    Abstract = {Systematic reviews are generally regarded by professionals in the field of evidence-based medicine as the highest level of medical evidence, and they are already standard practice for clinical studies. However, they are not yet widely used nor undertaken in the field of animal experimentation, even though there is a lot to be gained from the process. Therefore, a gold standard publication checklist (GSPC) for animal studies is presented in this paper. The items on the checklist have been selected on the basis of a literature analysis and the resulting scientific evidence that these factors are decisive in determining the outcome of animal studies. In order to make future systematic reviews and meta-analyses of animal studies possible, to allow others to replicate and build on work previously published, diminish the number of animals needed in animal experimentation (reduction), improve animal welfare (refinement) and, above all, improve the quality of scientific papers on animal experimentation, this publication checklist needs to be used and followed. We have discussed and optimised this GSPC through feedback from interviews with experts in the field of animal experimentation. From these interviews, it became clear that scientists will adopt this GSPC when journals demand it. The GSPC was compared with the current instructions for authors from nine different journals, selected on the basis that they featured a high number of publications on animal studies. In general, the journals' demands for the description of the animal studies are so limited that it is not possible to repeat the studies, let alone carry out a systematic review. By using the GSPC for animal studies, the quality of scientific papers will be improved. The use of the GSPC and the concomitant improvement in the quality of scientific papers will also contribute to decreased variation and increased standardisation and, as a consequence, a reduction in the numbers of animals used and a more reliable outcome of animal studies. It is of major importance that journal editors become convinced of and adopt these recommendations, because only then will scientists follow these guidelines to the full extent.},
    Author = {Hooijmans, C. R. and Leenaars, M. and Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.},
    Journal = {Alternatives to Laboratory Animals : ATLA},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = may,
    Note = {CI: 2010; JID: 8110074; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {167--182},
    Title = {A gold standard publication checklist to improve the quality of animal studies, to fully integrate the {Three} {Rs}, and to make systematic reviews more feasible},
    Volume = {38},
    Year = {2010}}
  • O’Connor, A. M., J. M. Sargeant, I. A. Gardner, J. S. Dickson, M. E. Torrence, Consensus Meeting Participants*, C. E. Dewey, I. R. Dohoo, R. B. Evans, J. T. Gray, M. Greiner, G. Keefe, S. L. Lefebvre, P. S. Morley, A. Ramirez, W. Sischo, D. R. Smith, K. Snedeker, J. Sofos, M. P. Ward, and R. Wills. “The REFLECT Statement: Methods and Processes of Creating Reporting Guidelines for Randomized Controlled Trials for Livestock and Food Safety by Modifying the CONSORT Statement.” Zoonoses and public health 57.2 (2010): 95-104. [Bibtex]
    @article{oconnor_reflect_2010,
    Abstract = {Summary The conduct of randomized controlled trials in livestock with production, health and food-safety outcomes presents unique challenges that may not be adequately reported in trial reports. The objective of this project was to modify the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement to reflect the unique aspects of reporting these livestock trials. A 2-day consensus meeting was held on 18-19 November 2008 in Chicago, IL, USA, to achieve the objective. Prior to the meeting, a Web-based survey was conducted to identify issues for discussion. The 24 attendees were biostatisticians, epidemiologists, food-safety researchers, livestock-production specialists, journal editors, assistant editors and associate editors. Prior to the meeting, the attendees completed a Web-based survey indicating which CONSORT statement items may need to be modified to address unique issues for livestock trials. The consensus meeting resulted in the production of the REFLECT (Reporting Guidelines for Randomized Control Trials) statement for livestock and food safety and 22-item checklist. Fourteen items were modified from the CONSORT checklist and an additional sub-item was proposed to address challenge trials. The REFLECT statement proposes new terminology, more consistent with common usage in livestock production, to describe study subjects. Evidence was not always available to support modification to or inclusion of an item. The use of the REFLECT statement, which addresses issues unique to livestock trials, should improve the quality of reporting and design for trials reporting production, health and food-safety outcomes.},
    Author = {O'Connor, A. M. and Sargeant, J. M. and Gardner, I. A. and Dickson, J. S. and Torrence, M. E. and Participants*, Consensus Meeting and Dewey, C. E. and Dohoo, I. R. and Evans, R. B. and Gray, J. T. and Greiner, M. and Keefe, G. and Lefebvre, S. L. and Morley, P. S. and Ramirez, A. and Sischo, W. and Smith, D. R. and Snedeker, K. and Sofos, J. and Ward, M. P. and Wills, R.},
    Journal = {Zoonoses and Public Health},
    Language = {ENG},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {JID: 101300786; aheadofprint},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {95--104},
    Title = {The {REFLECT} {Statement}: {Methods} and {Processes} of {Creating} {Reporting} {Guidelines} for {Randomized} {Controlled} {Trials} for {Livestock} and {Food} {Safety} by {Modifying} the {CONSORT} {Statement}},
    Volume = {57},
    Year = {2010}}
  • O’Connor, A. M., J. M. Sargeant, I. A. Gardner, J. S. Dickson, M. E. Torrence, and Evans Gray Greiner Keefe Lefebvre Morley Ramirez Sischo Smith Snedeker Sofos Ward Wills R. B. . J. T. . M. . G. . S. L. . P. S. . A. . W. . D. R. . K. . J. . M. P. . R. consensus meeting participants: C.E. Dewey I.R. Dohoo. “The REFLECT Statement: Methods and Processes of Creating Reporting Guidelines for Randomized Controlled Trials for Livestock and Food Safety.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 24.1 (2010): 57-64. [Bibtex]
    @article{oconnor_reflect_2010-1,
    Abstract = {The conduct of randomized controlled trials in livestock with production, health, and food-safety outcomes presents unique challenges that might not be adequately reported in trial reports. The objective of this project was to modify the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement to reflect the unique aspects of reporting these livestock trials. A 2-day consensus meeting was held on November 18-19, 2008 in Chicago, IL, to achieve the objective. Before the meeting, a Web-based survey was conducted to identify issues for discussion. The 24 attendees were biostatisticians, epidemiologists, food-safety researchers, livestock production specialists, journal editors, assistant editors, and associate editors. Before the meeting, the attendees completed a Web-based survey indicating which CONSORT statement items would need to be modified to address unique issues for livestock trials. The consensus meeting resulted in the production of the REFLECT (Reporting Guidelines for Randomized Control Trials) statement for livestock and food safety and 22-item checklist. Fourteen items were modified from the CONSORT checklist, and an additional subitem was proposed to address challenge trials. The REFLECT statement proposes new terminology, more consistent with common usage in livestock production, to describe study subjects. Evidence was not always available to support modification to or inclusion of an item. The use of the REFLECT statement, which addresses issues unique to livestock trials, should improve the quality of reporting and design for trials reporting production, health, and food-safety outcomes.},
    Author = {O'Connor, A. M. and Sargeant, J. M. and Gardner, I. A. and Dickson, J. S. and Torrence, M. E. and consensus meeting participants: C.E. Dewey, I.R. Dohoo, R.B. Evans, J.T. Gray, M. Greiner, G. Keefe, S.L. Lefebvre, P.S. Morley, A. Ramirez, W. Sischo, D.R. Smith, K. Snedeker, J. Sofos, M.P. Ward, R. Wills},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Keywords = {Animals, Animal Welfare, Congresses as Topic, Consumer Product Safety, Domestic, Editorial Policies, Guidelines as Topic, Humans, Periodicals as Topic/standards, Publishing/standards, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/standards, Writing/standards},
    Language = {ENG},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {JID: 8708660; aheadofprint},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {57--64},
    Title = {The {REFLECT} {Statement}: {Methods} and {Processes} of {Creating} {Reporting} {Guidelines} for {Randomized} {Controlled} {Trials} for {Livestock} and {Food} {Safety}},
    Volume = {24},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Olivry, T.. “Evidence-based dermatology.” Veterinary dermatology 21.1 (2010): 127. [Bibtex]
    @article{olivry_evidence-based_2010,
    Author = {Olivry, T.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Dermatology},
    Month = feb,
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {127},
    Title = {Evidence-based dermatology},
    Volume = {21},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Roudebush, P. and S. D. Forrester. “What is the evidence? Therapeutic foods for cats with chronic kidney disease.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 236.4 (2010): 416-417. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_what_2010,
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Forrester, S. D.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cat Diseases/diet therapy, Cats, Chronic/diet therapy/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Kidney Failure, Male},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {416--417},
    Title = {What is the evidence? {Therapeutic} foods for cats with chronic kidney disease},
    Volume = {236},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Roudebush, P., S. D. Forrester, and T. Padgelek. “What is the evidence?.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 236.9 (2010): 965-966. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_what_2010-1,
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Forrester, S. D. and Padgelek, T.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = may,
    Note = {JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {9},
    Pages = {965--966},
    Title = {What is the evidence?},
    Volume = {236},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Roudebush, P., D. J. Polzin, L. G. Adams, T. L. Towell, and S. D. Forrester. “An evidence-based review of therapies for canine chronic kidney disease.” The journal of small animal practice (2010). [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_evidence-based_2010,
    Abstract = {Successful treatment and prevention of kidney disease in dogs requires a multi-dimensional approach to identify and eliminate causes or exacerbating factors, provide professional evaluation on a regular basis and implement a comprehensive treatment programme when necessary. Over the years, many therapeutic and preventive interventions have been developed or advocated for chronic kidney disease in dogs, but evidence of efficacy or effectiveness is often lacking or highly variable. Accordingly, the main objective of this systematic review was to identify and critically appraise the evidence supporting various aspects of managing canine chronic kidney disease.},
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Polzin, D. J. and Adams, L. G. and Towell, T. L. and Forrester, S. D.},
    Journal = {The Journal of small animal practice},
    Language = {ENG},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {JID: 0165053; aheadofprint},
    Title = {An evidence-based review of therapies for canine chronic kidney disease},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Sahora, A. and C. Khanna. “A survey of evidence in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine oncology manuscripts from 1999 to 2007.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 24.1 (2010): 51-56. [Bibtex]
    @article{sahora_survey_2010,
    Abstract = {OBJECTIVES: To survey and monitor trends in evidence for oncology manuscripts published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (JVIM) between 1999 and 2007 based on an evidence-based medicine (EBM) standard. METHODS: All veterinary oncology-related articles published in JVIM and 7 other high-impact journals from 1999 to 2007 were collected by database searches. Relevant manuscripts then were characterized including investigator affiliation, subject matter investigated, retrospective or prospective study design, manuscript type, and classifications of manuscripts using an EBM standard. RESULTS: A total of 172 relevant veterinary oncology manuscripts were identified in JVIM between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of oncology manuscripts published each year rose with the total number of manuscripts published in JVIM (mean, 13\%; range, 8-15\%). The author affiliations and subject matter were similar during this evaluation period. Case series represented the most common manuscript type (40\%). With the exception of a progressive increase in prospective manuscripts and a reduction in case reports, no significant changes in the classification of manuscripts using EBM standards were seen. During this same period, veterinary oncology manuscripts published in 7 high-impact journals were associated with higher standards of evidence including prospective studies and randomized trials. CONCLUSIONS: The standards of evidence for veterinary oncology manuscripts published in JVIM have remained static between 1999 and 2007. This survey provides an informative benchmark for the state of evidence in previous JVIM oncology manuscripts and may be useful in identifying specific opportunities that may raise the standards of evidence in future publications in JVIM.},
    Author = {Sahora, A. and Khanna, C.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {JID: 8708660; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {51--56},
    Title = {A survey of evidence in the {Journal} of {Veterinary} {Internal} {Medicine} oncology manuscripts from 1999 to 2007},
    Volume = {24},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Sargeant, J. M., A. M. O’Connor, I. A. Gardner, J. S. Dickson, M. E. Torrence, I. R. Dohoo, S. L. Lefebvre, P. S. Morley, A. Ramirez, and K. Snedeker. “The REFLECT statement: reporting guidelines for randomized controlled trials in livestock and food safety: explanation and elaboration.” Journal of food protection 73.3 (2010): 579-603. [Bibtex]
    @article{sargeant_reflect_2010,
    Abstract = {Concerns about the completeness and accuracy of reporting of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and the impact of poor reporting on decision-making have been documented in the medical field over the past several decades. Experience from RCTs in human medicine would suggest that failure to report critical trial features can be associated with biased estimated effect measures, and there is evidence to suggest similar biases occur in RCTs conducted in livestock populations. In response to these concerns, standardized guidelines for reporting RCTs were developed and implemented in human medicine. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement was first published in 1996 with a revised edition published in 2001. The CONSORT statement consists of a 22-item checklist for reporting a RCT and a flow diagram to follow the number of participants at each stage of a trial. An explanation and elaboration document not only defines and discusses the importance of each of the items, but also provides examples of how this information could be supplied in a publication. Differences between human and livestock populations necessitate modifications to the CONSORT statement to maximize its usefulness for RCTs involving livestock. These have been addressed in an extension of the CONSORT statement titled the REFLECT statement: Methods and processes of creating reporting guidelines for randomized control trials for livestock and food safety. The modifications made for livestock trials specifically addressed the common use of group housing and group allocation to intervention in livestock studies, the use of a deliberate challenge model in some trials, and common use of non-clinical outcomes, such as contamination with a foodborne pathogen. In addition, the REFLECT statement for RCTs in livestock populations proposed specific terms or further clarified terms as they pertained to livestock studies.},
    Author = {Sargeant, J. M. and O'Connor, A. M. and Gardner, I. A. and Dickson, J. S. and Torrence, M. E. and Dohoo, I. R. and Lefebvre, S. L. and Morley, P. S. and Ramirez, A. and Snedeker, K.},
    Journal = {Journal of Food Protection},
    Keywords = {Animals, Animal Welfare, Consumer Product Safety, Domestic, Editorial Policies, Guidelines as Topic, Humans, Periodicals as Topic/standards, Publishing/standards, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/standards, Writing/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {JID: 7703944; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {579--603},
    Title = {The {REFLECT} statement: reporting guidelines for randomized controlled trials in livestock and food safety: explanation and elaboration},
    Volume = {73},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Sargeant, J. M., A. Thompson, J. Valcour, R. Elgie, J. Saint-Onge, P. Marcynuk, and K. Snedeker. “Quality of reporting of clinical trials of dogs and cats and associations with treatment effects.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 24.1 (2010): 44-50. [Bibtex]
    @article{sargeant_quality_2010,
    Abstract = {Background: To address concerns about the quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials, and the potential for biased treatment effects in poorly reported trials, medical journals have adopted a common set of reporting guidelines, the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement, to improve the reporting of randomized controlled trials. Hypothesis: The reporting of clinical trials involving dogs and cats might not be ideal, and this might be associated with biased treatment effects. Animals: Dogs and cats used in 100 randomly selected reports of clinical trials. Methods: Data related to methodological quality and completeness of reporting were extracted from each trial. Associations between reporting of trial features and the proportion of positive treatment effects within trials were evaluated by generalized linear models. Results: There were substantive deficiencies in reporting of key trial features. An increased proportion of positive treatment effects within a trial was associated with not reporting: the method used to generate the random allocation sequence (P {\textless} .001), the use of double blinding (P {\textless} .001), the inclusion criteria for study subjects (P= .003), baseline differences between treatment groups (P= .006), the measurement used for all outcomes (P= .002), and possible study limitations (P= .03). Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Many clinical trials involving dogs and cats in the literature do not report details related to methodological quality and aspects necessary to evaluate external validity. There is some evidence that these deficiencies are associated with treatment effects. There is a need to improve reporting of clinical trials, and guidelines, such as the CONSORT statement, can provide a valuable tool for meeting this need.},
    Author = {Sargeant, J. M. and Thompson, A. and Valcour, J. and Elgie, R. and Saint-Onge, J. and Marcynuk, P. and Snedeker, K.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Language = {ENG},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {JID: 8708660; aheadofprint},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {44--50},
    Title = {Quality of reporting of clinical trials of dogs and cats and associations with treatment effects},
    Volume = {24},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Shaughnessy, M. R. and E. H. Hofmeister. “What is the evidence? How accurate are noninvasive transmission pulse oximeters in dogs?.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 236.1 (2010): 55-56. [Bibtex]
    @article{shaughnessy_what_2010,
    Author = {Shaughnessy, M. R. and Hofmeister, E. H.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {anesthesia, Animals, Anoxia/blood/diagnosis/veterinary, Blood Gas Analysis/veterinary, Dog Diseases/blood/diagnosis, Dogs, General/veterinary, Heart Rate, Male, Oximetry/standards/veterinary, Oxygen/blood, Oxyhemoglobins/analysis, Sensitivity and Specificity},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {JID: 7503067; 0 (Oxyhemoglobins); 7782-44-7 (Oxygen); ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {55--56},
    Title = {What is the evidence? {How} accurate are noninvasive transmission pulse oximeters in dogs?},
    Volume = {236},
    Year = {2010}}
  • O’Connor, A. M., J. M. Sargeant, I. A. Gardner, J. S. Dickson, M. E. Torrence, C. E. Dewey, I. R. Dohoo, R. B. Evans, J. T. Gray, M. Greiner, G. Keefe, S. L. Lefebvre, P. S. Morley, A. Ramirez, W. Sischo, D. R. Smith, K. Snedeker, J. Sofos, M. P. Ward, and R. Wills. “The REFLECT statement: methods and processes of creating reporting guidelines for randomized controlled trials for livestock and food safety.” Preventive veterinary medicine 93.1 (2010): 11-18. [Bibtex]
    @article{oconnor_reflect_2010-2,
    Annote = {JID: 8217463; 2009/09/24 [received]; 2009/10/15 [accepted]; 2009/11/18 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
    Author = {O'Connor, A M and Sargeant, J M and Gardner, I A and Dickson, J S and Torrence, M E and Dewey, C E and Dohoo, I R and Evans, R B and Gray, J T and Greiner, M and Keefe, G and Lefebvre, S L and Morley, P S and Ramirez, A and Sischo, W and Smith, D R and Snedeker, K and Sofos, J and Ward, M P and Wills, R},
    Journal = {Preventive Veterinary Medicine},
    Month = jan,
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {11--18},
    Title = {The {REFLECT} statement: methods and processes of creating reporting guidelines for randomized controlled trials for livestock and food safety},
    Volume = {93},
    Year = {2010}}
  • Roudebush, P. and S. D. Forrester. “What is the evidence? Therapeutic foods for cats with chronic kidney disease.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 236.4 (2010): 416-417. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_what_2010-2,
    Annote = {JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Author = {Roudebush, P and Forrester, S D},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Month = feb,
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {416--417},
    Title = {What is the evidence? {Therapeutic} foods for cats with chronic kidney disease},
    Volume = {236},
    Year = {2010}}

2009

  • REFLECT: reporting guidelines for randomized controlled trials for livestock and food safety. 2009. [Bibtex]
    @book{_reflect:_2009,
    Title = {{REFLECT}: reporting guidelines for randomized controlled trials for livestock and food safety},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Arlt, S., V. Dicty, and W. Heuwieser. “Evidence-based medicine in canine reproduction: quality of current available literature.” Reproduction in domestic animals = zuchthygiene (2009). [Bibtex]
    @article{arlt_evidence-based_2009,
    Abstract = {Contents The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of published literature on reproduction in dogs. A systematic search in online databases revealed 287 papers that met the inclusion criteria. For evaluation a questionnaire comprising 40 criteria regarding materials and methodology, study design, statistics, presentation and information content, applicability and conclusions was developed. In a pre-test including seven independent scientists the applicability and explanatory power of the questionnaire and its results were validated. Out of 287 publications evaluated, 90 (31.4\%) were classified as clinical trials. The remaining 197 publications were case reports or contained information based on personal experience. Not a single meta-analysis was found. Sixty (66.7\%) of the 90 clinical trials included a control group. Randomization was conducted in 23 and blinding in eight articles respectively. In total five articles were determined as randomized, controlled and blinded clinical trials. Information content of the publications was variable concerning details on included animals, type or dosage of used remedies or conducted interventions. For example, in 99.7\% of the articles, the exact number of animals was given, but in 79.8\%, housing and feeding of the animals were not described. Statistical procedures of clinical trials were determined adequate in 55.6\%. However, the data of 67.9\% of the articles were evaluated to be not sufficient to draw valid conclusions. This study revealed evidence of deficits in the field of canine reproduction. The demand for more high quality clinical research is obvious. Requisite for the further implementation of the evidence-based veterinary medicine is an improvement of the quantity and the quality of well-designed, conducted and reported clinical trials. The practitioner should always assess the quality of information before implementing results into practice to provide best available care for the animals.},
    Author = {Arlt, S. and Dicty, V. and Heuwieser, W.},
    Journal = {Reproduction in domestic animals = Zuchthygiene},
    Language = {ENG},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {JID: 9015668; aheadofprint},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine in canine reproduction: quality of current available literature},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Brodbelt, D.. “Retrospective studies: the good, the bad or the ugly?.” Journal of small animal practice 50.11 (2009): 565-566. [Bibtex]
    @article{brodbelt_retrospective_2009,
    Author = {Brodbelt, D.},
    Journal = {Journal of Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Research Design, Retrospective Studies, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {JID: 0165053; ppublish},
    Number = {11},
    Pages = {565--566},
    Title = {Retrospective studies: the good, the bad or the ugly?},
    Volume = {50},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Cook, J. L. and C. R. Cook. “What is the evidence? Forelimb lameness in a dog–evidence-based decision making.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 235.9 (2009): 1053-1055. [Bibtex]
    @article{cook_what_2009,
    Author = {Cook, J. L. and Cook, C. R.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animal/diagnosis, Animals, Arthroscopy/veterinary, Bone/diagnosis/surgery/veterinary, Dog Diseases/diagnosis/surgery, Dogs, Evidence-Based Medicine, Forelimb/pathology, Fractures, Lameness, Male},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {9},
    Pages = {1053--1055},
    Title = {What is the evidence? {Forelimb} lameness in a dog--evidence-based decision making},
    Volume = {235},
    Year = {2009}}
  • de Groot, E.. “Lifelong learning for veterinarians.” Tijdschrift voor diergeneeskunde 134.2 (2009): 88-89. [Bibtex]
    @article{groot_lifelong_2009,
    Author = {Groot, E. de},
    Journal = {Tijdschrift voor Diergeneeskunde},
    Month = jan,
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {88--89},
    Title = {Lifelong learning for veterinarians},
    Volume = {134},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Drobatz, K. J.. “Measures of accuracy and performance of diagnostic tests.” Journal of veterinary cardiology : the official journal of the european society of veterinary cardiology 11 Suppl 1 (2009): S33–S40. [Bibtex]
    @article{drobatz_measures_2009,
    Abstract = {Diagnostic tests are integral to the practice of veterinary cardiology, any other specialty, and general veterinary medicine. Developing and understanding diagnostic tests is one of the cornerstones of clinical research. This manuscript describes the diagnostic test properties including sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, likelihood ratio, receiver operating characteristic curve. METHODS: Review of practical book chapters and standard statistics manuscripts. RESULTS: Diagnostics such as sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, likelihood ratio, and receiver operating characteristic curve are described and illustrated. CONCLUSION: Basic understanding of how diagnostic tests are developed and interpreted is essential in reviewing clinical scientific papers and understanding evidence based medicine.},
    Author = {Drobatz, K. J.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Cardiology : the official journal of the European Society of Veterinary Cardiology},
    Keywords = {Animal Diseases/diagnosis, Animals, Confidence Intervals, Diagnostic Tests, Heart Diseases/diagnosis/veterinary, Likelihood Functions, Predictive Value of Tests, Reproducibility of Results, ROC Curve, Routine/standards/veterinary, Sensitivity and Specificity, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = may,
    Note = {JID: 101163270; RF: 12; 2008/11/12 [received]; 2009/01/02 [revised]; 2009/03/10 [accepted]; 2009/05/17 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
    Pages = {S33--S40},
    Title = {Measures of accuracy and performance of diagnostic tests},
    Volume = {11 Suppl 1},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Fajt, V. R., D. Brown, and M. M. Scott. “Practicing the skills of evidence-based veterinary medicine through case-based pharmacology rounds.” Journal of veterinary medical education 36.2 (2009): 186-195. [Bibtex]
    @article{fajt_practicing_2009,
    Abstract = {Accessing new knowledge and using it to make decisions is the foundation of evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM), the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and owner/manager values. Reflecting on our experience with an EBVM-based clinical pharmacology assignment during a clinical rotation, we present the justification for the addition of an EBVM assignment to the clinical (fourth) year at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Texas A\&M University. We also present an in-depth analysis of the addition, recommendations for the assessment of this exercise as a method of improving evidence-based veterinary practice, and recommendations and implications for other instructors interested in adding EBVM-related learning to their professional curricula. We recommend adding EBVM skill practice in pre-clinical training, abbreviated exercises in EBVM skills on clinical rotations, and increased attention to critical-thinking skills in veterinary education.},
    Author = {Fajt, V. R. and Brown, D. and Scott, M. M.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Medical Education},
    Keywords = {Animals, Curriculum, Decision Making, Education, Evidence-Based Practice/education/methods, Health Occupations, Humans, Pharmacology/education, Preceptorship/methods, Questionnaires, Students, Texas, Veterinary/methods},
    Language = {eng},
    Note = {JID: 7610519; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {186--195},
    Title = {Practicing the skills of evidence-based veterinary medicine through case-based pharmacology rounds},
    Volume = {36},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Gibbons, P. M.. “Problem-oriented exotic companion animal practice.” Journal of exotic pet medicine 18.3 (2009): 181-186. [Bibtex]
    @article{gibbons_problem-oriented_2009,
    Abstract = {Problem-oriented veterinary medicine is a method of hypothetico-deductive clinical reasoning that can be recorded and easily understood by others. It is a stepwise process of gathering case information; defining problems; making plans for diagnosis, treatment, and client education; and evaluating patient progress over time. This explicit method of diagnostic reasoning forms the basis of evidence-based veterinary medicine and informed decision making. The goal of this article is to describe how problem-oriented veterinary medicine can help veterinarians refine case information into a diagnosis, satisfy the concerns of their clients, and provide the best possible quality of life for their exotic companion animal patients.},
    Author = {Gibbons, P. M.},
    Journal = {Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine},
    Keywords = {DAMNIT, Decision Making, exotic companion animal, medical records, problem-oriented veterinary medicine, SOAP},
    Month = jul,
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {181--186},
    Title = {Problem-oriented exotic companion animal practice},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Gibbons, P. M.. “Evidence-based, problem-oriented medicine.” Journal of exotic pet medicine 18.3 (2009): 172-173. [Bibtex]
    @article{gibbons_evidence-based_2009,
    Author = {Gibbons, P. M.},
    Journal = {Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine},
    Month = jul,
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {172--173},
    Title = {Evidence-based, problem-oriented medicine},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Gibbons, P. M. and J. Mayer. “Evidence in exotic animal practice: a "how-to-guide".” Journal of exotic pet medicine 18.3 (2009): 174-180. [Bibtex]
    @article{gibbons_evidence_2009,
    Abstract = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine is a process used to guide clinical decision making thereby allowing veterinarians to find, appraise, and integrate current best evidence with individual clinical expertise, client wishes, and patient needs. Although the concept of using research evidence to guide clinical decisions is not new, a structured approach to integrating these aspects of veterinary practice opens the door to allow the overwhelming amount of available published evidence to flow into the veterinary examination room. The goal of this article,is to demystify evidence-based veterinary, medicine and explain how techniques in exotic animal practice.},
    Author = {Gibbons, P. M. and Mayer, J.},
    Journal = {Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine},
    Keywords = {amphibian, avian, evidence-based veterinary medicine, exotic animal, exotic companion mammal, reptile},
    Month = jul,
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {174--180},
    Title = {Evidence in exotic animal practice: a "how-to-guide"},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Holmes, M. A.. “Philosophical foundations of evidence-based medicine for veterinary clinicians.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 235.9 (2009): 1035-1039. [Bibtex]
    @article{holmes_philosophical_2009,
    Author = {Holmes, M. A.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Biomedical Research/methods, Evidence-Based Medicine/standards, Research Design, veterinarians, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {9},
    Pages = {1035--1039},
    Title = {Philosophical foundations of evidence-based medicine for veterinary clinicians},
    Volume = {235},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Horzinek, M.. “Current best evidence translated into current best advice.” Journal of feline medicine and surgery 11.7 (2009): 527-528. [Bibtex]
    @article{horzinek_current_2009,
    Author = {Horzinek, M.},
    Journal = {Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jul,
    Note = {JID: 100897329; ppublish},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {527--528},
    Title = {Current best evidence translated into current best advice},
    Volume = {11},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Kilkenny, C., N. Parsons, E. Kadyszewski, M. F. Festing, I. C. Cuthill, D. Fry, J. Hutton, and D. G. Altman. “Survey of the quality of experimental design, statistical analysis and reporting of research using animals.” Plos one 4.11 (2009): e7824. [Bibtex]
    @article{kilkenny_survey_2009,
    Abstract = {For scientific, ethical and economic reasons, experiments involving animals should be appropriately designed, correctly analysed and transparently reported. This increases the scientific validity of the results, and maximises the knowledge gained from each experiment. A minimum amount of relevant information must be included in scientific publications to ensure that the methods and results of a study can be reviewed, analysed and repeated. Omitting essential information can raise scientific and ethical concerns. We report the findings of a systematic survey of reporting, experimental design and statistical analysis in published biomedical research using laboratory animals. Medline and EMBASE were searched for studies reporting research on live rats, mice and non-human primates carried out in UK and US publicly funded research establishments. Detailed information was collected from 271 publications, about the objective or hypothesis of the study, the number, sex, age and/or weight of animals used, and experimental and statistical methods. Only 59\% of the studies stated the hypothesis or objective of the study and the number and characteristics of the animals used. Appropriate and efficient experimental design is a critical component of high-quality science. Most of the papers surveyed did not use randomisation (87\%) or blinding (86\%), to reduce bias in animal selection and outcome assessment. Only 70\% of the publications that used statistical methods described their methods and presented the results with a measure of error or variability. This survey has identified a number of issues that need to be addressed in order to improve experimental design and reporting in publications describing research using animals. Scientific publication is a powerful and important source of information; the authors of scientific publications therefore have a responsibility to describe their methods and results comprehensively, accurately and transparently, and peer reviewers and journal editors share the responsibility to ensure that published studies fulfil these criteria.},
    Author = {Kilkenny, C. and Parsons, N. and Kadyszewski, E. and Festing, M. F. and Cuthill, I. C. and Fry, D. and Hutton, J. and Altman, D. G.},
    Journal = {PloS one},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {JID: 101285081; OID: NLM: PMC2779358; 2009/08/25 [received]; 2009/10/15 [accepted]; 2009/11/30 [epublish]; epublish},
    Number = {11},
    Pages = {e7824},
    Title = {Survey of the quality of experimental design, statistical analysis and reporting of research using animals},
    Volume = {4},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Lloret, A.. “The process of evidence-based medicine.” Journal of feline medicine and surgery 11.7 (2009): 529. [Bibtex]
    @article{lloret_process_2009,
    Author = {Lloret, A.},
    Journal = {Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine/methods, Humans, Research/standards, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jul,
    Note = {JID: 100897329; ppublish},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {529},
    Title = {The process of evidence-based medicine},
    Volume = {11},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Mayer, J.. “Evidence-based medicine in small mammals.” Journal of exotic pet medicine 18.3 (2009): 213-219. [Bibtex]
    @article{mayer_evidence-based_2009,
    Abstract = {Evidence-based medicine in small exotic mammals is often considered challenging because of a lack of information related to reference data, validated diagnostic tests, treatment outcome, side effects, long-term prognosis, and financial constraints of the owner. However, despite this lack of information, it is still possible to provide good medical care to small exotic mammals and confirm a disease diagnosis that can be properly treated. With many small exotic mammal cases, the condition of the animal and, ultimately, the disease diagnosis, may not be familiar to the attending veterinarian, and in some cases the disease itself may not have ever been described in that species in the scientific literature. This article describes the process of diagnosing hyperthyroidism, in a guinea pig using a recommended patient assessment, diagnostic, and treatment protocol. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
    Author = {Mayer, J.},
    Journal = {Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine},
    Keywords = {best research evidence, clinical expertise, Evidence-Based Medicine, exotic small mammal, problem-oriented medicine, value of pet},
    Month = jul,
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {213--219},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine in small mammals},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Ness, M.. “Evidence based medicine: a clinician’s viewpoint.” Journal of small animal practice 50.12 (2009): 627-628. [Bibtex]
    @article{ness_evidence_2009,
    Author = {Ness, M.},
    Journal = {Journal of Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/standards/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {JID: 0165053; ppublish},
    Number = {12},
    Pages = {627--628},
    Title = {Evidence based medicine: a clinician's viewpoint},
    Volume = {50},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Pak, S. and Y. W. Lee. “An introduction to data analysis.” Journal of veterinary clinics 26.3 (2009): 189-199. [Bibtex]
    @article{pak_introduction_2009,
    Abstract = {With the growing importance of evidence-based medicine, clinical or biomedical research relies critically on the validity and reliability of data, and the subsequent statistical inferences for medical decision-making may lead to valid conclusion. Despite widespread use of analytical techniques in papers published in the Journal of Veterinary Clinics statistical errors particularly in design of experiments, research methodology or data analysis methods are commonly encountered. These flaws often leading to misinterpretation of the data, thereby, subjected to inappropriate conclusions. This article is the first in a series of nontechnical introduction designed not to systemic review of medical statistics but intended to provide the journal readers with an understanding of common statistical concepts, including data scale, selection of appropriate statistical methods, descriptive statistics, data transformation, confidence interval, the principles of hypothesis testing, sampling distribution, and interpretation of results.},
    Author = {Pak, S. and Lee, Y. W.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Clinics},
    Keywords = {analytical methods, animal hospitals, health centres, methodology, statistical analysis, statistics, techniques, transformation},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {189--199},
    Title = {An introduction to data analysis},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Pak, S. and Y. W. Lee. “Hypothesis testing: means and proportions.” Journal of veterinary clinics 26.5 (2009): 401-407. [Bibtex]
    @article{pak_hypothesis_2009,
    Abstract = {In the previous article in this series we introduced the basic concepts for statistical analysis. The present review introduces hypothesis testing for continuous and categorical data for readers of the veterinary science literature. For the analysis of continuous data, we explained t-test to compare a single mean with a hypothesized value and the difference between two means from two independent samples or between two means arising from paired samples. When the data are categorical variables, the x 2 test for association and homogeneity, Fisher's exact test and Yates' continuity correction for small samples, and test for trend, in which at least one of the variables is ordinal is described, together with the worked examples. McNemar test for correlated proportions is also discussed. The topics covered may provide a basic understanding of different approaches for analyzing clinical data.},
    Author = {Pak, S. and Lee, Y. W.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Clinics},
    Keywords = {analysis, clinical aspects, statistical analysis, veterinary science},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {401--407},
    Title = {Hypothesis testing: means and proportions},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Rossdale, P. D.. “Case reports versus evidence-based medicine (EBM).” Equine veterinary journal 41.4 (2009): 322-323. [Bibtex]
    @article{rossdale_case_2009,
    Author = {Rossdale, P. D.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Evidence-Based Medicine, Periodicals as Topic, Publishing, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {322--323},
    Title = {Case reports versus evidence-based medicine ({EBM})},
    Volume = {41},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Roudebush, P., D. J. Polzin, S. J. Ross, T. L. Towell, L. G. Adams, and Dru S. Forrester. “Therapies for feline chronic kidney disease. What is the evidence?.” Journal of feline medicine and surgery 11.3 (2009): 195-210. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_therapies_2009,
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Polzin, D. J. and Ross, S. J. and Towell, T. L. and Adams, L. G. and Forrester, S. Dru},
    Journal = {Journal of feline medicine and surgery},
    Keywords = {Animals, Calcitriol/therapeutic use, Calcium Channel Agonists/therapeutic use, Cat Diseases/therapy, Cats, Chronic/classification/therapy/veterinary, Combined Modality Therapy/veterinary, Dialysis/methods/veterinary, Disease Management, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Fluid Therapy/veterinary, Kidney Failure, Kidney Transplantation/veterinary, Male},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {JID: 100897329; 0 (Calcium Channel Agonists); 32222-06-3 (Calcitriol); RF: 109; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {195--210},
    Title = {Therapies for feline chronic kidney disease. {What} is the evidence?},
    Volume = {11},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Sargeant, J. M., R. Elgie, J. Valcour, J. Saint-Onge, A. Thompson, P. Marcynuk, and K. Snedeker. “Methodological quality and completeness of reporting in clinical trials conducted in livestock species.” Preventive veterinary medicine 91.2-4 (2009): 107-115. [Bibtex]
    @article{sargeant_methodological_2009,
    Abstract = {Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for evaluating efficacy of treatments under real world conditions and, as such, it is important that they are conducted with methodological rigour to prevent biased results. Many medical journals have adopted a standard checklist for reporting of RCTs, the CONSORT statement. The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical trials in livestock populations to assess methodological quality and completeness of reporting and to investigate the association between these criteria and treatment effects. A total of 100 clinical trials published between 2006 and 2008 in the English language were randomly selected. For each trial, 2 reviewers independently completed a checklist based on the CONSORT statement and a different 2 reviewers completed a standard template describing the outcomes used and the statistical significance of all reported treatment effects. Disagreements among reviewers were resolved by consensus. The results showed that there were substantive deficiencies in the reporting of many of trial features, both related to methodological quality and completeness of reporting. Details on key features such as randomization, double blinding, and the number of subjects lost to follow-up were reported in only 67, 4, and 62\% of trials, respectively. Reporting of random allocation to treatment group was associated with a lower proportion of positive treatments effects within trials, as was reporting of inclusion/exclusion criteria for study subjects, details on the intervention, animal signalment, significance tests of baseline differences for at least one variable, and the methods used to measure all outcomes. The results suggest that there are deficiencies in the current reporting of important features of RCTs conducted in livestock species and that these deficiencies may be associated with biased treatment effects. The creation and adoption of standards for trial reporting in livestock could aid authors, reviewers, and editors in ensuring that necessary trial details are reported in all published trials.},
    Author = {Sargeant, J. M. and Elgie, R. and Valcour, J. and Saint-Onge, J. and Thompson, A. and Marcynuk, P. and Snedeker, K.},
    Journal = {Preventive Veterinary Medicine},
    Keywords = {Advisory Committees/standards, Animal Diseases/diagnosis, Animals, cattle, Cattle Diseases/epidemiology, Disease Notification/standards, Domestic, Goat Diseases/epidemiology, Goats, Mandatory Reporting, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/standards/veterinary, Risk Management/standards, Sheep, Sheep Diseases/epidemiology, Swine, Swine Diseases/epidemiology},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {JID: 8217463; 2009/02/25 [received]; 2009/05/30 [revised]; 2009/06/03 [accepted]; 2009/07/01 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
    Number = {2-4},
    Pages = {107--115},
    Title = {Methodological quality and completeness of reporting in clinical trials conducted in livestock species},
    Volume = {91},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Sargeant, J. M., J. Saint-Onge, J. Valcour, A. Thompson, R. Elgie, K. Snedeker, and P. Marcynuk. “Quality of reporting in clinical trials of preharvest food safety interventions and associations with treatment effect.” Foodborne pathogens and disease 6.8 (2009): 989-999. [Bibtex]
    @article{sargeant_quality_2009,
    Abstract = {Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for evaluating treatment efficacy. Therefore, it is important that RCTs are conducted with methodological rigor to prevent biased results and report results in a manner that allows the reader to evaluate internal and external validity. Most human health journals now require manuscripts to meet the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) criteria for reporting of RCTs. Our objective was to evaluate preharvest food safety trials using a modification of the CONSORT criteria to assess methodological quality and completeness of reporting, and to investigate associations between reporting and treatment effects. One hundred randomly selected trials were evaluated using a modified CONSORT statement. The majority of the selected trials (84\%) used a deliberate disease challenge, with the remainder representing natural pathogen exposure. There were widespread deficiencies in the reporting of many trial features. Randomization, double blinding, and the number of subjects lost to follow-up were reported in only 46\%, 0\%, and 43\% of trials, respectively. The inclusion criteria for study subjects were only described in 16\% of trials, and the number of animals housed together was only stated in 52\% of the trials. Although 91 trials had more than one outcome, no trials specified the primary outcome of interest. There were significant bivariable associations between the proportion of positive treatment effects and failure to report the number of subjects lost to follow-up, the number of animals housed together in a group, the level of treatment allocation, and possible study limitations. The results suggest that there are substantive deficiencies in reporting of preharvest food safety trials, and that these deficiencies may be associated with biased treatment effects. The creation and adoption of standards for reporting in preharvest food safety trials will help to ensure the inclusion of important trial details in all publications.},
    Author = {Sargeant, J. M. and Saint-Onge, J. and Valcour, J. and Thompson, A. and Elgie, R. and Snedeker, K. and Marcynuk, P.},
    Journal = {Foodborne Pathogens and Disease},
    Keywords = {Animal Husbandry/methods, Animals, Bias (Epidemiology), Bibliometrics, Domestic/microbiology, Food Contamination/prevention \& control, Food Microbiology, Linear Models, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/standards/veterinary, Research Design/statistics \& numerical data},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {JID: 101120121; ppublish},
    Number = {8},
    Pages = {989--999},
    Title = {Quality of reporting in clinical trials of preharvest food safety interventions and associations with treatment effect},
    Volume = {6},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Scrivani, P. V.. Study design tutorial. 2009. [Bibtex]
    @book{scrivani_study_2009,
    Author = {Scrivani, P. V.},
    Title = {Study design tutorial},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Torres, B. T., M. G. Radlinsky, and S. C. Budsberg. “What is the evidence? Surgical intervention in a cat with idiopathic chylothorax.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 235.10 (2009): 1167-1169. [Bibtex]
    @article{torres_what_2009,
    Author = {Torres, B. T. and Radlinsky, M. G. and Budsberg, S. C.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cat Diseases/surgery, Cats, Chylothorax/surgery/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Male},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {10},
    Pages = {1167--1169},
    Title = {What is the evidence? {Surgical} intervention in a cat with idiopathic chylothorax},
    Volume = {235},
    Year = {2009}}
  • van der Woude, J.. “Evidence based veterinary medicine, the translational reality to the individual patient.” Tijdschrift voor diergeneeskunde 134.17 (2009): 724-725. [Bibtex]
    @article{woude_evidence_2009,
    Author = {Woude, J. van der},
    Journal = {Tijdschrift voor diergeneeskunde},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {dut},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {LR: 20091111; JID: 0031550; ppublish},
    Number = {17},
    Pages = {724--725},
    Title = {Evidence based veterinary medicine, the translational reality to the individual patient},
    Volume = {134},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Vandeweerd, J. M. E.. “First steps in evidence-based medicine: document search using database.” Pratique veterinaire equine 41.162 (2009): 51-55. [Bibtex]
    @article{vandeweerd_first_2009,
    Author = {Vandeweerd, J. M. E.},
    Journal = {Pratique Veterinaire Equine},
    Number = {162},
    Pages = {51--55},
    Title = {First steps in evidence-based medicine: document search using database},
    Volume = {41},
    Year = {2009}}
  • Ness, M.. “Evidence based medicine: a clinician’s viewpoint.” Journal of small animal practice 50.12 (2009): 627-628. [Bibtex]
    @article{ness_evidence_2009-1,
    Annote = {JID: 0165053; ppublish},
    Author = {Ness, M},
    Journal = {Journal of Small Animal Practice},
    Month = dec,
    Number = {12},
    Pages = {627--628},
    Title = {Evidence based medicine: a clinician's viewpoint},
    Volume = {50},
    Year = {2009}}

2008

  • Boden, L. A. and T. D. H. Parkin. “Clinical evidence notebook: Current guidelines on good reporting of analytical observational studies in epidemiology.” Equine veterinary journal 40.1 (2008): 84-86. [Bibtex]
    @article{boden_clinical_2008,
    Author = {Boden, L. A. and Parkin, T. D. H.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Data Interpretation, Epidemiologic Research Design/veterinary, Epidemiologic Studies, Guidelines as Topic, Humans, Observation/methods, Patient Selection, Sample Size, Statistical},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {84--86},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {Current} guidelines on good reporting of analytical observational studies in epidemiology},
    Volume = {40},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Cardwell, J. M.. “An overview of study design.” Journal of small animal practice 49.5 (2008): 217-218. [Bibtex]
    @article{cardwell_overview_2008,
    Author = {Cardwell, J. M.},
    Journal = {Journal of Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Epidemiologic Methods/veterinary, Epidemiologic Studies, Evidence-Based Medicine, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/veterinary, Research Design},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = may,
    Note = {JID: 0165053; EIN: J Small Anim Pract. 2008 Sep;49(9):487; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {217--218},
    Title = {An overview of study design},
    Volume = {49},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Cronin, K. L.. “Oncology: Evaluating studies: first weight alll the evidence.” Dvm newsmagazine 39.12 (2008): 6S–8S. [Bibtex]
    @article{cronin_oncology:_2008,
    Author = {Cronin, K. L.},
    Journal = {DVM Newsmagazine},
    Month = dec,
    Number = {12},
    Pages = {6S--8S},
    Title = {Oncology: {Evaluating} studies: first weight alll the evidence},
    Volume = {39},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Denagamage, Thomas Nishantha. Application of evidence-based medicine to veterinary science and food safety. 2008. [Bibtex]
    @book{denagamage_application_2008,
    Abstract = {Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an area of clinical medicine that uses aims to combine the best scientific evidence with practical experience to make the decision about a patient's outcome. The concept has been used in human medicine for the past 15-20 years and has expanded in include areas of evidence-based public health and evidence based nursing. In veterinary science and food safety, recent publications have discussed the need for evidence-based approaches to study design and literature review in agri-food public health to make informed decisions for food safety policy makers and other decision makers in food production continuum. The idea of formalizing the evidence-based approach to decision making is therefore relatively new to veterinary science and food safety. Veterinary science and food safety differ greatly from clinical medicine in many important areas including the unit of concern, i.e. individual versus groups, prevention of outcomes rather than treatment of disease, the influence of publication bias and the availability of challenge models to assess outcomes. Therefore, translation of EBM concepts to veterinary science and food safety will require careful consideration of what is applicable and when are changes needed for these unique fields. The aim of this thesis has been to apply some of the concepts of EBM to veterinary science and food safety using interventions designed for pre-harvest interventions in Salmonella in swine. Research is conducted so that science may reduce our uncertainty about the outcome and decisions. Individual research papers contribute a small amount to understanding. However, scientists should be able to evaluate a body of work on a topic and report what the body of work is "telling us". This formal approach to the evaluation of a body of work is a relatively new field in veterinary science and food safety. The aim is to translate the body of work into a format that makes it consumable by the end user. There are many methods of translating a body of scientific literature for decision makers such as risk assessment, expert opinion, narrative review, meta-analysis and the approach evaluated in this thesis i.e. systematic review which may include meta analysis.},
    Author = {Denagamage, Thomas Nishantha},
    Isbn = {978-0-549-54148-6},
    Title = {Application of evidence-based medicine to veterinary science and food safety},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Ferguson, B.. “The end of conventional veterinary medicine.” Australian veterinary journal 86.3 (2008): 70. [Bibtex]
    @article{ferguson_end_2008,
    Author = {Ferguson, B.},
    Journal = {Australian Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Homeopathy/methods/standards, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/methods/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {JID: 0370616; CON: Aust Vet J. 2007 Dec;85(12):513-6. PMID: 18042162; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {70},
    Title = {The end of conventional veterinary medicine},
    Volume = {86},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Holmes, M. A.. “How to start practicing evidence-based veterinary medicine: a practical guide for over-worked practitioners.” San Diego, CA: American Association of Equine Practitioners, 2008. 327-335. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{holmes_how_2008,
    Address = {San Diego, CA},
    Author = {Holmes, M. A.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {Annual} {Convention}. {American} {Association} of {Equine} {Practitioners}},
    Language = {English},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {54th Annual Convention. American Association of Equine Practitioners.},
    Pages = {327--335},
    Publisher = {American Association of Equine Practitioners},
    Title = {How to start practicing evidence-based veterinary medicine: a practical guide for over-worked practitioners},
    Volume = {54},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Holmes, Mark A. and Peter D. Cockcroft. Handbook of veterinary clinical research. Oxford, UK ; Ames, Iowa: Blackwell Pub., 2008. [Bibtex]
    @book{holmes_handbook_2008,
    Address = {Oxford, UK ; Ames, Iowa},
    Author = {Holmes, Mark A. and Cockcroft, Peter D.},
    Isbn = {978-1-4051-4551-0 1-4051-4551-X},
    Keywords = {Epidemiologic Methods, methodology, Research Design, Veterinary, veterinary medicine, Veterinary medicine Research},
    Note = {Mark Holmes, Peter Cockcroft.; Includes bibliographical references and index.},
    Publisher = {Blackwell Pub.},
    Title = {Handbook of veterinary clinical research},
    Url = {http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0717/2007018852.html; http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0802/2007018852-d.html; http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0802/2007018852-b.html},
    Year = {2008},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0717/2007018852.html;%20http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0802/2007018852-d.html;%20http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0802/2007018852-b.html}}
  • Kastelic, J. P.. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine.” Magyar allatorvosok lapja 130.Suppl 1 (2008): 55-58. [Bibtex]
    @article{kastelic_evidence-based_2008,
    Abstract = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EVBM) is based on using the best available evidence, as well as the practitioner's expertise, to make the best decisions for patients and clients. The process involves forming a question, seeking and assessing information, and using that information, in combination with clinical expertise, to formulate a course of action. This article briefly reviews the principles regarding this process, and provides entries into the literature, including key references, to provide an introduction to this topic.},
    Author = {Kastelic, J. P.},
    Journal = {Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja},
    Keywords = {diagnosis, diagnostic techniques, domestic animals, livestock, reviews, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {XXV World Buiatrics Congress, Budapest, Hungary, 6-11 July, 2008.},
    Number = {Suppl 1},
    Pages = {55--58},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine},
    Volume = {130},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Mair, T. S. and White N. A. 2nd. “The creation of an international audit and database of equine colic surgery: survey of attitudes of surgeons.” Equine veterinary journal 40.4 (2008): 400-404. [Bibtex]
    @article{mair_creation_2008,
    Abstract = {REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Currently, there is a lack of available evidence-based data concerning the optimum treatments for horses affected by different types of colic and this precludes the application of clinical audit in this area. In order to accumulate such data, a large-scale, multicentre database of the outcomes of colic surgery is proposed. The attitudes of surgeons is an important consideration in determining the feasibility of developing this database. OBJECTIVES: To assess attitudes and opinions of equine surgeons concerning clinical audit and to assess the perceived advantages and problems of setting up a large-scale international audit/database of colic surgery. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 30 equine surgeons (large animal/equine surgeons who are diplomates of either the American College of Veterinary Surgeons or the European College of Veterinary Surgeons). Questionnaires were sent by e-mail to 98 equine surgeons. RESULTS: Face to face interviews were conducted (n = 30) and 43/98 completed questionnaires received (44\%). The results of the 2 techniques were very similar. There was generally a high level of interest in the development of a large scale database of colic surgery, but perceived problems included time to collect and submit data, and confidentiality issues. A minority of surgeons reported that they were undertaking any form of specific monitoring of the results of colic surgery within their hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: There is a good level of interest among equine surgeons to develop a large scale database of colic surgery and most would be willing to contribute data from their own hospitals provided that data collection is quick and easy, and that confidentiality is maintained.},
    Author = {Mair, T. S. and 2nd, N. A. White},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Attitudes, Clinical Audit/organization \& administration, Clinical Competence, Colic/surgery/veterinary, Confidentiality, databases, Data Collection, Evidence-Based Medicine, Factual, Health Knowledge, Horse Diseases/surgery, horses, Humans, Outcome Assessment (Health Care)/statistics \& numerical data, Practice, Questionnaires, Surgery, Treatment Outcome, Veterinarians/psychology, Veterinary/methods/standards/statistics \& numerical data},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {400--404},
    Title = {The creation of an international audit and database of equine colic surgery: survey of attitudes of surgeons},
    Volume = {40},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Matushek, K. J. and J. H. Audin. “A new classification for retrospective reviews of medical records.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 232.1 (2008): 6. [Bibtex]
    @article{matushek_new_2008,
    Author = {Matushek, K. J. and Audin, J. H.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Humans, medical records, Periodicals as Topic/classification/standards/trends, Retrospective Studies, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {LR: 20080324; JID: 7503067; CIN: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Feb 15;232(4):504. PMID: 18323014; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {6},
    Title = {A new classification for retrospective reviews of medical records},
    Volume = {232},
    Year = {2008}}
  • May, C.. “Evidence-based practice.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 37.7 (2008): 707–8; author reply 708–9. [Bibtex]
    @article{may_evidence-based_2008,
    Author = {May, C.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Quality Control, Surgery, Veterinary Medicine/standards, Veterinary/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {JID: 8113214; CON: Vet Surg. 2007 Oct;36(7):610-2. PMID: 17894586; ppublish},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {707--8; author reply 708--9},
    Title = {Evidence-based practice},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Roudebush, P., W. D. Schoenherr, and S. J. Delaney. “An evidence-based review of the use of therapeutic foods, owner education, exercise, and drugs for the management of obese and overweight pets.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 233.5 (2008): 717-725. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_evidence-based_2008,
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Schoenherr, W. D. and Delaney, S. J.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animal Feed, Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena, Animal/physiology, Animals, Cat Diseases/diet therapy, Cats, Diet, Dog Diseases/diet therapy, Dogs, Humans, Obesity/diet therapy/veterinary, Patient Education as Topic, Physical Conditioning, Reducing, Treatment Outcome, Weight Loss},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {LR: 20081121; JID: 7503067; RF: 84; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {717--725},
    Title = {An evidence-based review of the use of therapeutic foods, owner education, exercise, and drugs for the management of obese and overweight pets},
    Volume = {233},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Roudebush, P., W. D. Schoenherr, and S. J. Delaney. “An evidence-based review of the use of nutraceuticals and dietary supplementation for the management of obese and overweight pets.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 232.11 (2008): 1646-1655. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_evidence-based_2008-1,
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Schoenherr, W. D. and Delaney, S. J.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena, Animals, Anti-Obesity Agents/therapeutic use, Cat Diseases/drug therapy, Cats, Dietary Supplements, Dog Diseases/drug therapy, Dogs, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Male, Obesity/drug therapy/veterinary, Overweight/drug therapy/veterinary, Prevalence, risk factors},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {LR: 20081121; JID: 7503067; 0 (Anti-Obesity Agents); RF: 80; ppublish},
    Number = {11},
    Pages = {1646--1655},
    Title = {An evidence-based review of the use of nutraceuticals and dietary supplementation for the management of obese and overweight pets},
    Volume = {232},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Thoresen, A. N.. “Vem vill gora evidensbaserad forskning pa komplementar medicin? [Who will undertake evidence-based research in complementary medicine?].” Svensk veterinartidning 60.16 (2008): 43-45. [Bibtex]
    @article{thoresen_vem_2008,
    Author = {Thoresen, A. N.},
    Journal = {Svensk Veterinartidning},
    Keywords = {acupuncture, alternative medicine, physical therapy, Research, therapy, veterinary medi},
    Number = {16},
    Pages = {43--45},
    Title = {Vem vill gora evidensbaserad forskning pa komplementar medicin? [{Who} will undertake evidence-based research in complementary medicine?]},
    Volume = {60},
    Year = {2008}}
  • Toth, L. A. and S. Compton. “Evidence-based animal care: new contributions to our knowledge base and the need for more.” Journal of the american association for laboratory animal science : jaalas 47.2 (2008): 8. [Bibtex]
    @article{toth_evidence-based_2008,
    Author = {Toth, L. A. and Compton, S.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science : JAALAS},
    Keywords = {Animal Care Committees, Animal Husbandry/education, Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Laboratory, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {LR: 20090615; JID: 101269489; OID: NLM: PMC2654002; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {8},
    Title = {Evidence-based animal care: new contributions to our knowledge base and the need for more},
    Volume = {47},
    Year = {2008}}

2007

  • Aragon, C. L., E. H. Hofmeister, and S. C. Budsberg. “Systematic review of clinical trials of treatments for osteoarthritis in dogs.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 230.4 (2007): 514-521. [Bibtex]
    @article{aragon_systematic_2007,
    Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To identify and critically evaluate the quality of evidence of the most commonly used pharmacologic, nutraceutical, and purported slow-acting drugs of osteoarthritis for the management of osteoarthritis in dogs by use of the FDA's evidence-based medicine scoring system. DESIGN: Systematic review. SAMPLE POPULATION: 16 clinical trials. PROCEDURES: A broad bibliographic search was performed prior to May 2006. Inclusion criteria focused on prospective trials evaluating commonly used medical treatment interventions for the management of osteoarthritis in dogs and published in peer-reviewed journals. The analysis consisted of the following: study design rating, quality factor rating, quantity rating, consistency rating, relevance to disease risk reduction rating, and cumulative strength of evidence ranking. RESULTS: 4 trials evaluating meloxicam were rated as type I. Three trials evaluating carprofen were rated as type I, and 2 trials were rated as type III. One trial evaluating each of the following agents was rated as type 1: etodolac; P54FP; polysulfated glycosaminoglycan; and a combination of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and manganese ascorbate. Two trials evaluating pentosan polysulphate and 2 trails evaluating green-lipped mussels were rated as type I. One trial evaluating hyaluronan was rated as type III. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A high level of comfort exists for meloxicam that the claimed relationship is scientifically valid and that its use is clinically efficacious for the treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs. A moderate level of comfort exists for carprofen; etodolac; pentosan polysulphate; green-lipped mussels; P54FP; polysulfated glycosaminoglycans; and a combination of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and manganese ascorbate. An extremely low level of comfort exists for hyaluronan.},
    Author = {Aragon, C. L. and Hofmeister, E. H. and Budsberg, S. C.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Chondroitin/therapeutic use, clinical trials, Dog Diseases/drug therapy/pathology, Dogs, Evidence-Based Medicine, Glucosamine/therapeutic use, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use, Osteoarthritis/drug therapy/pathology/veterinary, Severity of Illness Index, Thiazines/therapeutic use, Thiazoles/therapeutic use, Treatment Outcome},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {ID: 781; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 0 (Thiazines); 0 (Thiazoles); 3416-24-8 (Glucosamine); 71125-38-7 (meloxicam); 9007-27-6 (Chondroitin); RF: 39; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {514--521},
    Title = {Systematic review of clinical trials of treatments for osteoarthritis in dogs},
    Volume = {230},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Barquero, N., J. R. Gilkerson, and J. R. Newton. “Evidence-based immunization in horses..” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 481-508. [Bibtex]
    @article{barquero_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {Evidence of vaccine efficacy is essential for practitioners when giving advice to clients about the relative merits of different vaccines or when trying to evaluate the economic benefits of instituting a vaccine program. In equine veterinary medicine, this sort of data, which are necessary to make informed decisions about vaccine use and effectiveness, are often not available. Veterinarians need to consider the epidemiology of the disease in question, the type of vaccine that they are administering to the animal, the immunologic constraints of the vaccine technology, and the available evidence of efficacy when they are evaluating which vaccine to use or whether to vaccinate at all.},
    Author = {Barquero, N. and Gilkerson, J. R. and Newton, J. R.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {control programmes, control programs, efficacy, Equid herpesvirus 1, Equid herpesvirus 4, Equine herpesvirus 1, Equine herpesvirus 4, Equine influenzavirus, equine viral arteritis, horses, immune sensitization, immunization, Influenzavirus, lockjaw, Streptococcus equi, tetanus, vaccine development, vaccines, veterinary practice},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1304; PT: J BD: Orthomyxoviridae; negative-sense ssRNA viruses; ssRNA viruses; RNA viruses; viruses; Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes; Streptococcus; Streptococcaceae; Firmicutes; bacteria; prokaryotes; equid herpesviruses; Herpesviridae; dsDNA viruses; DNA viruses; Varicellovirus; Alphaherpesvirinae ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {481--508},
    Title = {Evidence-based immunization in horses.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Beard, W. L. and S. Waxman. “Evidence-based equine upper respiratory surgery.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 229-242. [Bibtex]
    @article{beard_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {The purpose of this article is to review the veterinary literature for various surgical procedures of the equine upper respiratory tract in an effort to evaluate the evidence supporting various therapies. This article focuses on the therapeutic benefit from more widely occurring conditions, such as laryngeal hemiplegia, dorsal displacement of the soft palate, arytenoid chondritis, and epiglottic entrapment.},
    Author = {Beard, W. L. and Waxman, S.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Epiglottis/pathology/surgery, Evidence-Based Medicine, Hemiplegia/surgery/veterinary, Horse Diseases/surgery, horses, Laryngeal Diseases/surgery/veterinary, Laryngoscopy/veterinary, Larynx/pathology/surgery, Palate, Pharyngeal Diseases/surgery/veterinary, Pharynx/pathology/surgery, Soft/pathology/surgery, Surgery, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary/methods},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {JID: 8511904; RF: 44; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {229--242},
    Title = {Evidence-based equine upper respiratory surgery},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Bedenice, D.. “Evidence-based medicine in equine critical care..” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 293-316. [Bibtex]
    @article{bedenice_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {One of the fundamental skills required for practicing evidence-based medicine is the development of a well-built clinical question, which specifies the patient group or problem, intervention, and outcome of interest. For this purpose, various "levels of evidence" have been developed in the human literature, which rank the validity of evidence. Our established conclusions and advice are thus supported by specific "grades of recommendations," which are intended to give an indication of the "strength" of a clinical recommendation. This article was compiled with these principles in mind.},
    Author = {Bedenice, D.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {animal health, critical care, horses, intensive care, sepsis, therapeutics, therapy, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1305; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {293--316},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine in equine critical care.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Bertone, J. J.. “Evidence-based drug use in equine medicine and surgery..” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 201-213. [Bibtex]
    @article{bertone_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {The nature of the equine industry and equine veterinary medicine often requires veterinarians to prescribe drugs with little evidence for a drug's formulation safety or efficacy, or even assurance of the chemistry of the drug used. This means that equine veterinarians must remain skeptics and understand the limitations in their ability to attribute safety and efficacy to a particular drug or treatment. An evidence-based approach to pharmacology demands rigorous testing and an unbiased analysis of results.},
    Author = {Bertone, J. J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {animal health products, drug formulations, drug safety, efficacy, horses, pharmacology, Surgery, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary products},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1309; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {201--213},
    Title = {Evidence-based drug use in equine medicine and surgery.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Brinsko, S. P.. “Common procedures in broodmare practice: what is the evidence?.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 385-402. [Bibtex]
    @article{brinsko_common_2007,
    Abstract = {Many procedures performed as part of routine broodmare practice are based on sound clinical judgment and experience or scientific evidence; however, others are based on perceived problems and needs to address them. This article presents four procedures commonly used in broodmare practice, for which there is questionable evidence to substantiate their use.},
    Author = {Brinsko, S. P.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine practice},
    Keywords = {Animal/blood/physiology, Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration \& dosage, Breeding/methods, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Horse Diseases/prevention \& control, Horses/physiology, Pregnancy, Progesterone, Thyroid Hormones/administration \& dosage},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {JID: 8511904; 0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Thyroid Hormones); 57-83-0 (Progesterone); RF: 95; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {385--402},
    Title = {Common procedures in broodmare practice: what is the evidence?},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Brown, D. C.. “Outcomes based medicine in veterinary surgery: getting hard measures of subjective outcomes.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 36.4 (2007): 289-292. [Bibtex]
    @article{brown_outcomes_2007,
    Author = {Brown, D. C.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Decision Making, Evidence-Based Medicine, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Questionnaires/standards, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity, Surgery, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {JID: 8113214; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {289--292},
    Title = {Outcomes based medicine in veterinary surgery: getting hard measures of subjective outcomes},
    Volume = {36},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Carmalt, J. L.. “Evidence-based equine dentistry: preventive medicine..” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 519-524. [Bibtex]
    @article{carmalt_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {Dental problems are some of the most common reasons for a horse to be presented to an equine veterinarian. Despite the importance of anecdotal evidence as a starting point, the science of equine dentistry (especially prophylactic dentistry) has remained poorly supported by evidence-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. In the 21st century, veterinarians have an ethical responsibility to promote and use the results of evidence-based research and not propagate statements attesting to the purported benefits of intervention without supporting research. Consider also that society is becoming more litigious and therefore is basing treatment plans and advice on published research, which protects the profession from legal challenges concerning our professional conduct. This article reviews the current published evidence concerning the role of equine dentistry in feed digestibility and performance.},
    Author = {Carmalt, J. L.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {dentistry, digestibility, feeds, horses, performance, preventive medicine, tooth diseases, veterinary practice, weight losses},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1303; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {519--524},
    Title = {Evidence-based equine dentistry: preventive medicine.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Carney, S. and H. Doll. “Clinical evidence notebook: Measures of association as used to address therapy, harm, and aetiology questions.” Equine veterinary journal 39.2 (2007): 99-100. [Bibtex]
    @article{carney_clinical_2007,
    Author = {Carney, S. and Doll, H.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Horse Diseases/etiology/therapy, horses, Publishing/standards, Research/standards, Risk, Risk Adjustment},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {99--100},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {Measures} of association as used to address therapy, harm, and aetiology questions},
    Volume = {39},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Caston, S. S. and E. L. Reinertson. “Evidence-based musculoskeletal surgery in horses.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 461-479. [Bibtex]
    @article{caston_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {Musculoskeletal disorders comprise a large portion of the conditions treated by equine veterinarians. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice in many cases. The body of literature describing and exploring surgical correction of musculoskeletal disorders in horses is steadily growing but still lacking. At this juncture, we can use what information we have with the understanding that as the quality of research advances, we should apply stricter standards to the evidence we use to answer our clinical questions.},
    Author = {Caston, S. S. and Reinertson, E. L.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Bone/surgery/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Fractures, Horse Diseases/surgery, horses, Musculoskeletal Diseases/surgery/veterinary, Musculoskeletal Physiological Phenomena},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {LR: 20081121; JID: 8511904; RF: 92; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {461--479},
    Title = {Evidence-based musculoskeletal surgery in horses},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Cockcroft, P. D.. “Clinical reasoning and decision analysis..” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 499-520. [Bibtex]
    @article{cockcroft_clinical_2007,
    Abstract = {Decision analysis enables outstanding information needs to be correctly identified and ensures that all the options are accurately represented so that appropriate decisions can be made. The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to the use of decision analysis in the practice of evidence-based veterinary medicine. Decision trees using utilities and economic outcomes are presented. The diagnostic process, including the critical appraisal of clinical decision support systems that may be used in this process, is described.},
    Author = {Cockcroft, P. D.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {accuracy, choice, Decision Making, ER, information, statistical analysis, statistical methods, veterinary medicine},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1315; PT: J},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {499--520},
    Title = {Clinical reasoning and decision analysis.},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Cook, J. L.. “Outcomes-based patient care in veterinary surgery: what is an outcome measure?.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 36.3 (2007): 187-189. [Bibtex]
    @article{cook_outcomes-based_2007,
    Author = {Cook, J. L.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Arthroplasty/methods/standards/veterinary, Benchmarking, Decision Support Techniques, Evidence-Based Medicine, Surgery, Veterinary/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 993; PUBM: Print; JID: 8113214; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {187--189},
    Title = {Outcomes-based patient care in veterinary surgery: what is an outcome measure?},
    Volume = {36},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Dicty, V.. A scientific evolution of the current available evidence in the literature of veterinary medicine – demonstrated in the area of physiology and pathology of reproductive veterinary medicine.. 2007. [Bibtex]
    @book{dicty_scientific_2007,
    Abstract = {Veterinarians are required to make their decisions based on current academic research. The decision-making process in daily veterinary practice of the veterinarians should be driven by objective and scientifically proven information. The study was conducted to search for published literature on reproduction of dogs and evaluate it based on the evidence. A literature search on the internet-based databases PubMed and Vet-CD was performed. Criterions on materials and methodology, study design, statistics, presentation and information content, practical applicability and conclusions were developed for analysing the literatures. Results revealed that 90 and 197 of the 287 examined publications were clinical trials and case reports, respectively. Meta-analysis were not found in the literature of reproduction in dogs. Generally accepted and science-based conclusions could not be legitimately drawn by the collected data from half of the cases. It is suggested that published literatures on reproduction in dogs lack the evidence-based medicine. It is recommended that more clinical trials of higher quality based on evidence should be performed.},
    Author = {Dicty, V.},
    Isbn = {3-86664-338-1 978-3-86664-338-3},
    Keywords = {animal pathology, case reports, CC300 Information and Documentation LL070 Pets and Companion Animals LL250 Animal Reproduction and Embryology (NEW March 2000) LL860 Non-communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, choice, clinical trials, data banks, databases, Decision Making, Dogs, reproduction, small animal practice, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary science, veterinary services, veterinary surgeons, vets},
    Language = {German},
    Note = {ID: 1356; PT: B BD: Canis; Canidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; small mammals; eukaryotes; NR: many ref. ER},
    Title = {A scientific evolution of the current available evidence in the literature of veterinary medicine - demonstrated in the area of physiology and pathology of reproductive veterinary medicine.},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Doll, H. and S. Carney. “Clinical evidence notebook: Statistical approaches to uncertainty: P values and confidence intervals unpacked.” Equine veterinary journal 39.3 (2007): 275-276. [Bibtex]
    @article{doll_clinical_2007,
    Author = {Doll, H. and Carney, S.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Confidence Intervals, Data Interpretation, Evidence-Based Medicine, Statistical, Uncertainty},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = may,
    Note = {JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {275--276},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {Statistical} approaches to uncertainty: {P} values and confidence intervals unpacked},
    Volume = {39},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Eliashar, E.. “An evidence-based assessment of the biomechanical effects of the common shoeing and farriery techniques.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 425-442. [Bibtex]
    @article{eliashar_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {The first aim of this article is to review the progress made in the field of distal limb biomechanics. By understanding limb biomechanics, it is then possible to review the rationale behind a few of the more common techniques that veterinarians routinely use when treating their patients and to evaluate the evidence in support of them.},
    Author = {Eliashar, E.},
    Journal = {Veterinary clinics of North America: Equine practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Biomechanics, Evidence-Based Medicine, Hoof and Claw/physiology, horses},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {JID: 8511904; RF: 81; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {425--442},
    Title = {An evidence-based assessment of the biomechanical effects of the common shoeing and farriery techniques},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Evans, R. B. and A. O’Connor. “Statistics and evidence-based veterinary medicine: answers to 21 common statistical questions that arise from reading scientific manuscripts..” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 477-486. [Bibtex]
    @article{evans_statistics_2007,
    Abstract = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine relies critically on the scientific validity of research. A component of validity is the statistical design and subsequent analysis of data collected during the study. Correct statistical design reduces bias and improves generalizability, and correct analysis leads to appropriate inferences. Inference is the art and science of making correct decisions based on data. Because veterinarians are responsible for the medical care of their patients, it is also their responsibility to understand inferences about treatments presented in papers. This article is designed to assist veterinarians with the interpretation and understanding of statistics presented in the papers.},
    Author = {Evans, R. B. and O'Connor, A.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {ER, interpretation, publications, statistical analysis, statistical methods, statistics, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary surgeons, vets},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1316; PT: J},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {477--486},
    Title = {Statistics and evidence-based veterinary medicine: answers to 21 common statistical questions that arise from reading scientific manuscripts.},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Fahie, M. A. and D. Shettko. “Evidence-based wound management: a systematic review of therapeutic agents to enhance granulation and epithelialization.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 559-577. [Bibtex]
    @article{fahie_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {Successful management of open wounds in dogs requires knowledge of the physiology of wound healing and application of that knowledge to choose appropriate therapeutic intervention. The authors' objective was to investigate whether or not there are any available therapeutic agents that enhance granulation or epithelialization of open wounds in dogs. Based on the literature identified in the authors' review, there is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation for or against any of the topical wound agents or procedures studied.},
    Author = {Fahie, M. A. and Shettko, D.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1017},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {559--577},
    Title = {Evidence-based wound management: a systematic review of therapeutic agents to enhance granulation and epithelialization},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Faunt, K., E. Lund, and W. Novak. “The power of practice: harnessing patient outcomes for clinical decision making..” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 521-532. [Bibtex]
    @article{faunt_power_2007,
    Abstract = {The practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) relies on the ability of veterinarians to evaluate clinical outcomes. Evaluation of clinical outcomes optimizes the patient care process by transforming what is learned about a population of patients and applying it to an individual patient. Veterinarians' ability to summarize and record relevant information from each pet encounter enables outcomes analysis, thereby transforming clinical data into medical knowledge. This article describes the multiple integrated process required to evaluate outcomes and practice EBM. As a result of the aggregation and analysis of patient outcomes, knowledge is derived that has the potential to enhance clinical decision making and client communication.},
    Author = {Faunt, K. and Lund, E. and Novak, W.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Cats, choice, Decision Making, Dogs, patient care, small animal practice, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary surgeons, vets},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1314; PT: J BD: Felis; Felidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; small mammals; eukaryotes; Canis; Canidae ER},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {521--532},
    Title = {The power of practice: harnessing patient outcomes for clinical decision making.},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Forrester, S. D. and P. Roudebush. “Evidence-based management of feline lower urinary tract disease..” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 533-558. [Bibtex]
    @article{forrester_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {Many treatments have been recommended for managing cats with feline urinary tract disease (FLUTD). Veterinarians making therapeutic decisions should consider the quality of evidence supporting a recommendation to use (or not use) a particular treatment for cats with FLUTD. Whenever possible, recommendations should be based on results of randomized and well-controlled scientific studies performed in clinical patients with the spontaneously occurring disease of interest, In the absence of such studies, one is left to make the best recommendation possible with consideration of all information, including the quality of evidence. At this time, additional studies are needed to evaluate evidence for many currently recommended treatments for cats with FLUTD.},
    Author = {Forrester, S. D. and Roudebush, P.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cat Diseases/therapy, Cats, Clinical, Clinical Competence, cystitis, Decision Making, Decision Support Systems, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Male, small animal practice, therapeutics, therapy, urinary tract diseases, urolithiasis, Urologic Diseases/therapy/veterinary, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1313; PT: J BD: Felis; Felidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; small mammals; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {533--558},
    Title = {Evidence-based management of feline lower urinary tract disease.},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Hesbach, A. L.. “Techniques for objective outcome assessment..” Clinical techniques in small animal practice 22.4 (2007): 146-154. [Bibtex]
    @article{hesbach_techniques_2007,
    Abstract = {Companion animal rehabilitation, a collaborative practice of physical therapy and veterinary medicine, can only demonstrate the effectiveness of its theories, techniques, interventions, and modalities through evidence-based practice, utilizing standardized, reliable, and valid outcome measures, correlated with objective diagnostic data. This essay examines existing and potential objective outcome measures utilized in companion animal rehabilitation and physical therapy regarding pain, vital signs, body condition and composition, range of motion, muscle strength, inflammation, functional mobility, and gait. Discussion is included of the traditional disablement model and the evolution of the physical therapy diagnosis, prognosis, and plan of care.},
    Author = {Hesbach, A. L.},
    Journal = {Clinical Techniques in Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {body condition, clinical aspects, clinical picture, diagnosis, Dogs, gait, inflammation, Lameness, pain, patient care, physical therapy, postoperative care, prognosis, Surgery, techniques, therapeutics, therapy},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 1299; PT: J BD: Canis; Canidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; small mammals; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {146--154},
    Title = {Techniques for objective outcome assessment.},
    Volume = {22},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Hofmeister, E. H., J. King, M. R. Read, and S. C. Budsberg. “Sample size and statistical power in the small-animal analgesia literature.” Journal of small animal practice 48.2 (2007): 76-79. [Bibtex]
    @article{hofmeister_sample_2007,
    Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To document the power and required sample sizes to achieve certain treatment objectives in the veterinary analgesia literature. METHODS: Pubmed's MEDLINE database and selected journals were searched. Only publications produced between 1994 and 2004 that reported 'no difference' between experimental groups in the abstract, results or conclusion sections and those that were randomised, prospective and blinded were reviewed. The data reported in the publications were then subjected to power analyses to determine the power and necessary sample size (to achieve a power of 0.8) to allow detection of 20 per cent, 50 per cent and 80 per cent treatment effects. RESULTS: Twenty-two studies provided sufficient data for analysis. Five out of 22 (23 per cent) had sufficient power to detect a 20 per cent treatment effect, 12 of 22 (54 per cent) had sufficient power to detect a 50 per cent treatment effect and 18 of 22 (82 per cent) had sufficient power to detect an 80 per cent treatment effect. The mean number of animals required per group to document a 20 per cent, 50 per cent and 80 per cent treatment effect were 90, 15 and 7, respectively. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Publications that report no significant difference between analgesic regimens may have committed a Type II error. The reader may inappropriately conclude that there is no difference between treatments when there may, in fact, be a superior analgesic regimen. Clinical practice based on the principles of evidence-based medicine could therefore result in suboptimal care for patients.},
    Author = {Hofmeister, E. H. and King, J. and Read, M. R. and Budsberg, S. C.},
    Journal = {Journal of Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Analgesics/therapeutic use, Animals, Cats, Clinical Trials/statistics \& numerical data, Data Interpretation, Dogs, Pain/prevention \& control/veterinary, Sample Size, Statistical, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {ID: 866; PUBM: Print; JID: 0165053; 0 (Analgesics); CIN: J Small Anim Pract. 2007 Feb;48(2):69. PMID: 17286657; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {76--79},
    Title = {Sample size and statistical power in the small-animal analgesia literature},
    Volume = {48},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Holmes, M. A.. “Evidence for best veterinary practice: clinical veterinary research.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 21.4 (2007): 671-672. [Bibtex]
    @article{holmes_evidence_2007,
    Author = {Holmes, M. A.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Keywords = {Biomedical Research/standards, Evidence-Based Medicine, veterinarians, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1020; PUBM: Print; JID: 8708660; CON: J Vet Intern Med. 2007 Jul-Aug;21(4):754-9. PMID: 17708395; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {671--672},
    Title = {Evidence for best veterinary practice: clinical veterinary research},
    Volume = {21},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Holmes, M. A.. “Evaluation of the evidence.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 447-462. [Bibtex]
    @article{holmes_evaluation_2007,
    Abstract = {Evaluating the evidence describes the scientific basis of evidence as presented in papers describing the results of clinical research. The types of errors that may lead to misinterpretation of evidence are discussed. This article includes descriptions of the main types of research performed in veterinary clinical research and notes on their advantages and disadvantages.},
    Author = {Holmes, M. A.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Clinical Trials/standards/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Research Design/standards, Research/methods/standards, Veterinary Medicine/standards/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1021; PUBM: Print; JID: 7809942; RF: 7; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {447--462},
    Title = {Evaluation of the evidence},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Holmes, M. A. and D. W. Ramey. “An introduction to evidence-based veterinary medicine..” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 191-200. [Bibtex]
    @article{holmes_introduction_2007,
    Abstract = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine is not impossible to practice, nor does it restrict its followers from using their best clinical judgment in individual case management. Based on the experiences in the various fields of human medicine, veterinarians should expect that the base of evidence for veterinary treatments is likely to expand rapidly, with positive expectations for improved treatment results. They would be well served by learning and applying evidence-based approaches to veterinary care, for the benefit of all who participate in the veterinarian-client-patient interaction.},
    Author = {Holmes, M. A. and Ramey, D. W.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {animal health, animal rights, Animal Welfare, consumer information, horses, medical treatment, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary surgeons, vets},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1310; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {191--200},
    Title = {An introduction to evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Innes, J. F.. “Outcomes-based medicine in veterinary surgery: levels of evidence..” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 36.7 (2007): 610-612. [Bibtex]
    @article{innes_outcomes-based_2007,
    Abstract = {This article discusses the analysis of results of veterinary surgical research studies based on the levels and quality of evidence.},
    Author = {Innes, J. F.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {clinical trials, ER, Research, studies, Surgery, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 1302; PT: J},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {610--612},
    Title = {Outcomes-based medicine in veterinary surgery: levels of evidence.},
    Volume = {36},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Jenkins, C. C., T. A. Allen, and P. Roudebush. “Application of evidence-based medicine to veterinary clinical nutrition..” Eds. Kimsey, M. and S. D. Forrester. Sunny Isles Beach, FL: Hill’s Pet Nutrition, 2007. 8. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{jenkins_application_2007,
    Abstract = {The article discusses the concepts of evidence-based medicine and its application to veterinary clinical nutrition in managing companion animal diseases through dietary management and therapy.},
    Address = {Sunny Isles Beach, FL},
    Author = {Jenkins, C. C. and Allen, T. A. and Roudebush, P.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings of {Hill}'s {Symposium} on {Lower} {Urinary} {Tract} {Disease} ({LUTD})},
    Editor = {Kimsey, M. and Forrester, S. D.},
    Keywords = {animal nutrition, Cats, diet therapy, Dogs, nutritional disorders, pet animals, pets, special diets, therapeutic diets, therapeutic nutrition},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 1301; PT: B; CT: Proceedings of Hill's Symposium on Lower Urinary Tract Disease (LUTD) held at Sunny Isles Beach, Florida, USA, 18-20 April, 2007. BD: Felis; Felidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; small mammals; eukaryotes; Canis; Canidae ER},
    Pages = {8},
    Publisher = {Hill's Pet Nutrition},
    Title = {Application of evidence-based medicine to veterinary clinical nutrition.},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Kapatkin, A. S.. “Outcome-based medicine and its application in clinical surgical practice.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 36.6 (2007): 515-518. [Bibtex]
    @article{kapatkin_outcome-based_2007,
    Author = {Kapatkin, A. S.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Clinical Competence, Clinical Trials/methods/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Patient Care/standards/veterinary, Practice Guidelines, Surgery, Veterinary/methods/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1030; PUBM: Print; JID: 8113214; ppublish},
    Number = {6},
    Pages = {515--518},
    Title = {Outcome-based medicine and its application in clinical surgical practice},
    Volume = {36},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Keegan, K. G.. “Evidence-based lameness detection and quantification.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 403-423. [Bibtex]
    @article{keegan_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {Kinematic and kinetic gait analysis potentially offers veterinarians an objective method of determining equine limb lameness. Subjective analyses have been shown to be somewhat flawed, and there does not seem to be a high degree of intraobserver agreement when evaluating individual horses. In addition, recognition of the compensatory effects of primary lameness may be helpful for the practicing equine veterinarian.},
    Author = {Keegan, K. G.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {Animal/classification/diagnosis, Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Gait/physiology, horse diseases, horses, Lameness, Observer Variation, Severity of Illness Index},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {JID: 8511904; RF: 53; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {403--423},
    Title = {Evidence-based lameness detection and quantification},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Lunsford, Kari V. and Andrew J. Mackin. “Thromboembolic therapies in dogs and cats: an evidence-based approach.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 579-609. [Bibtex]
    @article{lunsford_thromboembolic_2007,
    Abstract = {In veterinary medicine, we are forced to make use of less than ideal ``evidence,'' such as extrapolation from experimental studies in dogs and cats without naturally occurring diseases and from clinical trials in other species (particularly human clinical trials), as well as limited information gained from veterinary clinical experience, small clinical trials, case studies, and anecdotal reports. In this article, specific treatment recommendations are made for each of the common thromboembolic conditions seen in dogs and cats. These recommendations are made with the important caveat that, to date, such suggested therapeutic approaches are based on limited evidence.},
    Author = {Lunsford, Kari V. and Mackin, Andrew J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1018},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {579--609},
    Title = {Thromboembolic therapies in dogs and cats: an evidence-based approach},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Mair, T. S., L. J. Smith, and C. E. Sherlock. “Evidence-based gastrointestinal surgery in horses..” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 267-292. [Bibtex]
    @article{mair_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {Colic surgery is now performed at many equine hospitals around the world. Despite the tremendous improvements in survival rates over the past 30 years, the morbidity and mortality rates remain relatively high. This fact, coupled with the high cost of treatment, makes it important to apply evidence-based medicine principles to establish the best possible treatment plans and surgical techniques whereby the outcomes can be optimized. Factors affecting survival rates and rates of major complications (incisional complications and postoperative ileus) are discussed. Preoperative assessment and postoperative care are not considered in this review.},
    Author = {Mair, T. S. and Smith, L. J. and Sherlock, C. E.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {celiotomy, colic, digestive tract, gastrointestinal tract, horses, postoperative complications, Surgery, surgical operations, surgical technique, survival, veterinary practice},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1306; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {267--292},
    Title = {Evidence-based gastrointestinal surgery in horses.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Mathias, E.. “Ethnoveterinary medicine in the era of evidence-based medicine: mumbo-jumbo, or a valuable resource?.” Veterinary journal 173.2 (2007): 241-242. [Bibtex]
    @article{mathias_ethnoveterinary_2007,
    Author = {Mathias, E.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {Developing Countries, Evidence-Based Medicine/standards, Medicine, Traditional, Veterinary Medicine/standards/trends},
    Note = {ID: 1019},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {241--242},
    Title = {Ethnoveterinary medicine in the era of evidence-based medicine: mumbo-jumbo, or a valuable resource?},
    Volume = {173},
    Year = {2007}}
  • 4th, Messer N. T. and P. J. Johnson. “Evidence-based literature pertaining to thyroid dysfunction and Cushing’s syndrome in the horse.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 329-364. [Bibtex]
    @article{4th_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {The evidence-based literature pertaining to thyroid dysfunction and Cushing's syndrome is discussed in this article. Summaries of and recommendations for the treatment of these conditions are made. There is a need for reliable diagnostic tests for these conditions in horses.},
    Author = {4th, N. T. Messer and Johnson, P. J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary clinics of North America: Equine practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cushing Syndrome/diagnosis/therapy/veterinary, diagnosis, Differential, Evidence-Based Medicine, Horse Diseases/diagnosis/therapy, horses, prognosis, Thyroid Diseases/diagnosis/therapy/veterinary, Treatment Outcome},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {JID: 8511904; RF: 159; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {329--364},
    Title = {Evidence-based literature pertaining to thyroid dysfunction and {Cushing}'s syndrome in the horse},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Murphy, S. A.. “Searching for veterinary evidence: strategies and resources for locating clinical research.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 433-445. [Bibtex]
    @article{murphy_searching_2007,
    Abstract = {This article offers information regarding selected veterinary information resources, along with basic search strategies for locating clinical evidence within these resources. No one database provides adequate indexing and abstracting to all literature relevant to the veterinary clinical question. An understanding of a database's syntax and field structure is necessary to formulate a functional search strategy and evaluate the outcome of search results. Flexibility when identifying, selecting, and combining search terms is also required to avoid overlimiting a search.},
    Author = {Murphy, S. A.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1009},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {433--445},
    Title = {Searching for veterinary evidence: strategies and resources for locating clinical research},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Nolen-Walston, R., J. Paxson, and D. W. Ramey. “Evidence-based gastrointestinal medicine in horses: it’s not about your gut instincts..” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 243-266. [Bibtex]
    @article{nolen-walston_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {The use of an evidence-based approach allows veterinary clinicians to assess questions that are clinically relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of equine gastrointestinal tract disease. This approach involves formulating a clinical question, searching the literature, and answering the question with the best available evidence, with the results summarized as a clinical "bottom line." This article is organized to reinforce the principle that the cornerstone of evidence-based medicine is the clinical question. Specific questions are further categorized as to topic, with epidemiologic risk factors, diagnostic process, clinical examination, differential diagnosis, diagnostic tests, treatment, harm, prognosis, and prevention as general themes. The topics covered in this article are by no means exhaustive but give an example of how the veterinary literature can be used to answer clinically important questions in an evidence-based manner.},
    Author = {Nolen-Walston, R. and Paxson, J. and Ramey, D. W.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {clinical examination, colic, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, digestive disorders, digestive tract, epidemiology, gastrointestinal tract, horses, medical treatment, risk factors, Salmonella infections, salmonellosis, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1307; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {243--266},
    Title = {Evidence-based gastrointestinal medicine in horses: it's not about your gut instincts.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Norman, G. R. and K. W. Eva. “Clinical evidence notebook; Does clinical experience make up for failure to keep up to date?.” Equine veterinary journal 39.4 (2007): 319-321. [Bibtex]
    @article{norman_clinical_2007,
    Author = {Norman, G. R. and Eva, K. W.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Adult, Age Factors, Animals, Attitudes, Clinical Competence, Female, Health Knowledge, Humans, Male, Practice, Veterinarians/psychology, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jul,
    Note = {JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {319--321},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook; {Does} clinical experience make up for failure to keep up to date?},
    Volume = {39},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Nuttall, T. and L. K. Cole. “Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of interventions for treatment of Pseudomonas otitis in dogs.” Veterinary dermatology 18.2 (2007): 69-77. [Bibtex]
    @article{nuttall_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {The efficacy and safety of pharmacological interventions to treat canine Pseudomonas otitis externa and media were evaluated based on the systematic review of clinical trials published between 1967 and 2006. Clinical trials were included if Pseudomonas species were cultured from the ears of dogs with otitis externa or otitis media prior to treatment, and if the outcome of these interventions was reported at the end of the study. Studies were compared with regard to design characteristics (randomization generation and concealment, masking, intention-to-treat analyses), benefit (microbiological and/or clinical resolution of the Pseudomonas otitis), and adverse effects. Ten trials reporting data on 162 patients and 13 different pharmacological interventions were identified. Based on the accepted criteria for quality of evidence, there is insufficient evidence for or against recommending the use of any of these treatments for Pseudomonas otitis in dogs. This is largely because there is only one trial supporting the use of each treatment option and none were randomized controlled trials. Future studies need to be prospective, randomized, blinded and controlled; designed to evaluate pharmacological interventions for otitis regardless of the infective organism; have appropriate statistical advice on recruitment numbers, the power of the study and appropriate statistical analysis; include details of underlying conditions and concomitant treatments; and be designed such that inclusion criteria include microbial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity, and outcome assessments include clinical examination, cytology and microbial culture.},
    Author = {Nuttall, T. and Cole, L. K.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Dermatology},
    Keywords = {Administration, Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration \& dosage/therapeutic use, Clinical Trials as Topic, Dog Diseases/drug therapy, Dogs, Otitis/drug therapy/veterinary, Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy/veterinary, Research Design, Topical},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {LR: 20071115; JID: 9426187; 0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); RF: 29; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {69--77},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of interventions for treatment of {Pseudomonas} otitis in dogs},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2007}}
  • O’Connor, A. and R. B. Evans. “Critically appraising studies reporting Assessing Diagnostic Tests.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 487-497. [Bibtex]
    @article{oconnor_critically_2007,
    Abstract = {Studies that report the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests are susceptible to flaws that can introduce bias and lead to incorrect estimates. This article uses the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies checklist to describe how to appraise a study reporting diagnostic test comparisons critically. The article also contains a glossary of terms that are useful in discussions about diagnostic tests.},
    Author = {O'Connor, A. and Evans, R. B.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: small animal practice},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1013},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {487--497},
    Title = {Critically appraising studies reporting {Assessing} {Diagnostic} {Tests}},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Ralston, S. L.. “Evidence-based equine nutrition.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 365-384. [Bibtex]
    @article{ralston_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {One of the most difficult problems in equine nutrition research is often the lack of objective and clinically relevant end points. Nevertheless, this article attempts to present the best evidence (or lack thereof) for some of the most common clinical questions pertaining to such topics as the evaluation of glucose and insulin tolerance and factors that may confound results, dietary management of horses prone to laminitis and rhabdomyolysis, nutritional prevention of gastric ulcers and developmental orthopedic disease, the efficacy of commonly used herbal products, and feeding geriatric horses.},
    Author = {Ralston, S. L.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {Animal Feed, Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena/physiology, Animals, Energy Metabolism/physiology, Evidence-Based Medicine, Horse Diseases/diet therapy/drug therapy/metabolism/prevention \& control, Horses/physiology, Nutritional Requirements, Phytotherapy/methods/veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {LR: 20081121; JID: 8511904; RF: 81; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {365--384},
    Title = {Evidence-based equine nutrition},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Evidence-based veterinary medicine.. Veterinary {Clinics} of {North} {America}: {Equine} {Practice}. v.23 (2): {Aug} 2007 191-532. Eds. Ramey, D. W. and D. W. Ramey. Vol. 23. Philadelphia: Saunders, 2007. [Bibtex]
    @book{ramey_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {This issue contains 18 articles on the use of evidence-based medicine in order to address the diagnostic and therapeutic management of infectious and non-infectious horse diseases.},
    Address = {Philadelphia},
    Editor = {Ramey, D. W. and Ramey, D. W.},
    Isbn = {0749-0739},
    Keywords = {aetiology, causal agents, chemotherapy, diagnosis, drug therapy, etiology, horse diseases, horses, Surgery, therapeutics, therapy, vaccination, vaccines, veterinary medicine},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1311; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {2},
    Publisher = {Saunders},
    Series = {Veterinary {Clinics} of {North} {America}: {Equine} {Practice}. v.23 (2): {Aug} 2007 191-532},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Rendle, D.. “Journal clubs in practice: time well spent?.” In practice 29.6 (2007): 360-362. [Bibtex]
    @article{rendle_journal_2007,
    Abstract = {In veterinary practice today it is more important than ever to maintain an awareness of the current literature and to have an appreciation of the concept of evidence-based medicine. The value of regular journal clubs is well recognised in postgraduate medical education, yet, says David Rendle, in veterinary practice few gather to discuss the latest developments in their fields. Unless well organised and executed, journal clubs may be infrequently attended and generally resented by the majority of participants. Here, he discusses ways of ensuring that these forums justify incorporation into the busy working day.},
    Author = {Rendle, D.},
    Journal = {In practice},
    Keywords = {clubs, ER, journals, Research, societies, studies, veterinary education, veterinary practice},
    Note = {ID: 1320; PT: J},
    Number = {6},
    Pages = {360--362},
    Title = {Journal clubs in practice: time well spent?},
    Volume = {29},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Richardson, D. W. and R. Loinaz. “An evidence-based approach to selected joint therapies in horses.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 443-460. [Bibtex]
    @article{richardson_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {There is an enormous volume of published material about most of the agents used to treat or prevent arthritis in horses. Unfortunately, most of the claims made by nearly all purveyors of arthritis medications in such media are largely unsubstantiated. In addition, the quality of the available information is highly inconsistent, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This article concentrates on injectable polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, injectable hyaluronan, and the common oral "nutraceuticals".},
    Author = {Richardson, D. W. and Loinaz, R.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Arthritis/drug therapy/prevention \& control/therapy/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Glycosaminoglycans/therapeutic use, Horse Diseases/drug therapy/prevention \& control/therapy, horses, Hyaluronic Acid/therapeutic use, Joint Diseases/drug therapy/therapy/veterinary, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use, Treatment Outcome},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {JID: 8511904; 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 0 (Glycosaminoglycans); 9004-61-9 (Hyaluronic Acid); RF: 76; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {443--460},
    Title = {An evidence-based approach to selected joint therapies in horses},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Robertson, S. R.. “Refining the clinical question: the first step in evidence-based veterinary medicine..” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 419-431. [Bibtex]
    @article{robertson_refining_2007,
    Abstract = {The ability to translate a clinical problem seen in practice into a focused and well-formed answerable clinical question is one of the hardest steps in practicing evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM). Asking answerable clinical questions that relate to your patient is the first evidence-based skill a veterinarian needs to learn, and it forms the cornerstone of the practice of EBVM. Like other clinical skills, the more you practice and work on refining clinical questions, the more precise these questions are and the easier the EVBM process becomes. This article reviews the different aspects of an answerable clinical question, its structure, and how to formulate questions better to get needed answers to clinical problems.},
    Author = {Robertson, S. R.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Cats, Dogs, small animal practice, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary surgeons, vets},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1317; PT: J BD: Felis; Felidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; small mammals; eukaryotes; Canis; Canidae ER},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {419--431},
    Title = {Refining the clinical question: the first step in evidence-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Rossdale, P. D. and E. S. Mayall. “The judgement of Solomon and journal status.” Equine veterinary journal 39.4 (2007): 290-291. [Bibtex]
    @article{rossdale_judgement_2007,
    Author = {Rossdale, P. D. and Mayall, E. S.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, horses, Humans, Periodicals/classification/standards, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jul,
    Note = {ID: 1029; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {290--291},
    Title = {The judgement of {Solomon} and journal status},
    Volume = {39},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Schmidt, P. L.. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine: evolution, revolution, or repackaging of veterinary practice?.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 409-417. [Bibtex]
    @article{schmidt_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {Over time, evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) should integrate with normal clinical practice. Also, clinical knowledge increases with EBVM, reducing the need for information in one area and allowing veterinarians to explore new areas of specialty or cutting-edge advances in the profession. Textbooks, journals, veterinary conferences and web sites provide nearly unlimited information about EBVM for the practicing veterinarian to help with the transition to EBVM use in daily practice life. EBVM should continue to change and improve how we, as veterinarians, provide the best available care to our clients and patients.},
    Author = {Schmidt, P. L.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {conferences, ER, internet, journals, knowledge, textbooks, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary profession, veterinary surgeons, vets},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1318; PT: J},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {409--417},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine: evolution, revolution, or repackaging of veterinary practice?},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Special issue: Evidence-based veterinary medicine.. Veterinary {Clinics} of {North} {America}: {Small} {Animal} {Practice}, v.37(3): {May} 2007 409-616. Eds. Schmidt, P. L. and P. L. Schmidt. Vol. 37. Philadelphia: Saunders, 2007. [Bibtex]
    @book{schmidt_special_2007,
    Abstract = {This issue is a guide to the principles and practice of evidence-based veterinary medicine (EVBM) for the practicing veterinarian. 12 articles are included in this issue. The concept and controversy of EBVM are presented. Individual articles focusing on each of the 5 steps of EBVM provide in-depth information on how a practicing veterinarian can adopt EBV procedures in their daily practice. Another 3 articles offer examples of EBVM outcomes for specific questions in small animal practice involving medicine, nutrition and surgery.},
    Address = {Philadelphia},
    Editor = {Schmidt, P. L. and Schmidt, P. L.},
    Isbn = {0195-5616},
    Keywords = {Cats, chemotherapy, choice, Decision Making, diagnostic techniques, Dogs, drugs, drug therapy, guidelines, medicines, nutrition, pharmaceuticals, recommendations, Research, studies, Surgery, thromboembolism, urinary tract diseases, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, wounds},
    Note = {ID: 1319; PT: J BD: Felis; Felidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; small mammals; eukaryotes; Canis; Canidae ER},
    Number = {3},
    Publisher = {Saunders},
    Series = {Veterinary {Clinics} of {North} {America}: {Small} {Animal} {Practice}, v.37(3): {May} 2007 409-616},
    Title = {Special issue: {Evidence}-based veterinary medicine.},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Schmidt, P. L.. “Preface.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): xi–xii. [Bibtex]
    @article{schmidt_preface_2007,
    Author = {Schmidt, P. L.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1006},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {xi--xii},
    Title = {Preface},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Schulz, K. S.. “The outcomes measures program: what’s in it for you?.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 36.8 (2007): 715-716. [Bibtex]
    @article{schulz_outcomes_2007,
    Author = {Schulz, K. S.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Patient Satisfaction, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Quality of Life, Questionnaires, Surgery, Veterinary/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {JID: 8113214; ppublish},
    Number = {8},
    Pages = {715--716},
    Title = {The outcomes measures program: what's in it for you?},
    Volume = {36},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Schwarzenberger, F., P. A. Burger, M. Reimers, and C. Walzer. “The importance of refereed scientific publications, and how to conduct a search for sound standing information in a veterinary practice..” Wiener tierarztliche monatsschrift 94.5/6 (2007): 133-142. [Bibtex]
    @article{schwarzenberger_importance_2007,
    Abstract = {The amount of scientific literature is increasing at an unprecedented rate. One benefit of the "information age" is the wide spread availability and distribution of scientific news through the general media, but this type of information is usually too superficial for professional use. The purpose of this paper is to help the veterinary professional to search current, accurate scientific information and to access original scientific publications. The importance of refereed scientific literature, its evaluation by the Science Citation Index and the Impact Factor are explained and debated. We describe how to locate refereed scientific publications via the internet within reasonable time and at low costs and how to make a critical assessment of such information. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of certain information channels, scientific databases and internet search engines like PubMed, Scirus, Google Scholar, Scopus, Webspirs, ISI Web of Knowledge, International Veterinary Information Service (IVIS) and Wikipedia. We give suggestions for their use and present examples of recent topics (antibiotics resistance, climate change, influenzavirus H5N1, prion disease) taken from the general media. We conclude that none of the listed information channels is the universal tool, and depending on the need and extent of required information, the combination of several information channels is recommended in order to expand beyond professional textbook knowledge. Furthermore, we discuss the concept of evidence-based medicine, for which critical reading and appraising of the scientific literature and other sources of information is key, and which propagates knowledge transfer of evidence gained from the scientific literature into medical and veterinary practice.},
    Author = {Schwarzenberger, F. and Burger, P. A. and Reimers, M. and Walzer, C.},
    Journal = {Wiener Tierarztliche Monatsschrift},
    Keywords = {data banks, databases, Data Collection, data storage, ER, information, information retrieval, Information Services, information storage, information systems, internet, publications, Research, studies, veterinary medicine},
    Note = {ID: 1312; PT: J},
    Number = {5/6},
    Pages = {133--142},
    Title = {The importance of refereed scientific publications, and how to conduct a search for sound standing information in a veterinary practice.},
    Volume = {94},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Toll, J. and E. B. Breitschwerdt. “Science, medicine, academia, and the future of the ACVIM.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 21.3 (2007): 364-366. [Bibtex]
    @article{toll_science_2007,
    Author = {Toll, J. and Breitschwerdt, E. B.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Forecasting, Humans, Research/trends, Veterinary Medicine/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {JID: 8708660; CON: J Vet Intern Med. 2007 May-Jun;21(3):394-401. PMID: 17552442; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {364--366},
    Title = {Science, medicine, academia, and the future of the {ACVIM}},
    Volume = {21},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Trevejo, R. T.. “A small animal clinician’s guide to critical appraisal of the evidence in scientific literature.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 37.3 (2007): 463-475. [Bibtex]
    @article{trevejo_small_2007,
    Abstract = {There is a tremendous amount of medical literature available to the clinician. The challenge is to identify information that is useful and relevant for the patient population of interest. This article provides an overview of important considerations when critically appraising a report, such as selection of the study population, features of the study design used, potential sources of bias, and evaluation of the statistical evidence.},
    Author = {Trevejo, R. T.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1011},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {463--475},
    Title = {A small animal clinician's guide to critical appraisal of the evidence in scientific literature},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Uhlinger, C. A.. “Evidence-based parasitology in horses.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 509-517. [Bibtex]
    @article{uhlinger_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {This article focuses on what has been established concerning the interaction of equine parasites and their hosts, highlighting those issues for which convincing data are still lacking. There is a compelling need for the participation of the veterinarian in the design of appropriate anthelmintic treatments and prevention strategies.},
    Author = {Uhlinger, C. A.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {Animal/drug therapy/prevention \& control, Animals, Anthelmintics/therapeutic use, Evidence-Based Medicine, Horse Diseases/drug therapy/prevention \& control, horses, Host-Parasite Interactions, Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic Diseases, Parasitic/drug therapy/prevention \& control/veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {LR: 20071115; JID: 8511904; 0 (Anthelmintics); RF: 45; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {509--517},
    Title = {Evidence-based parasitology in horses},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Biervliet, Van J.. “An evidence-based approach to clinical questions in the practice of equine neurology.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 317-328. [Bibtex]
    @article{biervliet_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {The practice of equine neurology has special challenges posed by the size of the animal being examined. Many diagnostic procedures routinely used in small animal practice are unsafe when applied to the equine patient or unavailable to the equine practitioner. Therefore, astute observation is the mainstay of making a neuroanatomic diagnosis, and detailed evidence on the deficits present may be difficult to obtain. Because clinical observation can sometimes be ambiguous and somewhat subjective, it is even more important to approach equine neurology from an evidence-based point of view. Here, such an approach is outlined for the diagnosis of cervical vertebral compressive myelopathy (CVCM), one of the most common noninfectious causes of equine neurologic disease. This article is an attempt to summarize all aspects of making a diagnosis of CVCM on the basis of signalment, clinical examination, ancillary diagnostic tests, and pathologic examination. Each of these considerations has inherent limitations regarding diagnostic accuracy, which are discussed.},
    Author = {Biervliet, J. Van},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, diagnosis, Differential, Evidence-Based Medicine, Horse Diseases/diagnosis, horses, Neurologic Examination/veterinary, Neurology/methods, Spinal Cord Compression/diagnosis/veterinary, Veterinary Medicine/methods/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {JID: 8511904; RF: 13; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {317--328},
    Title = {An evidence-based approach to clinical questions in the practice of equine neurology},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Vandeweerd, J. M. and R. Perrin. “Evidence-based medicine factual medicine..” Pratique veterinaire equine 39.156 (2007): 43-48. [Bibtex]
    @article{vandeweerd_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {The equine practitioner should be up to date with the current information on the rational approach to clinical work and adopt recent findings from scientific research. The veterinarian's professional responsibility may be questioned and lead to subsequent litigation if inadequacy in clinical decisions and knowledge is found. Understanding the experimental methods is essential in order to assess a hypothesis and to publish the results. The evidence-based medical approach is practised in human medicine and is currently developing in veterinary medicine. The process requires good continuing professional development in clinical areas, effective study of the literature that describes the main elements of proof to respond to clinical questions, systematic criticism of data provided, assessment of their suitability for the patient and analyses of the efficacy of the approach for each case. This organised procedure is based on precise criteria and techniques with epidemiology as a key factor. The evidence-based medical approach can provide the veterinary medicine with solid foundations and decisions relative to the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and risks based on foreseeable findings.},
    Author = {Vandeweerd, J. M. and Perrin, R.},
    Journal = {Pratique Veterinaire Equine},
    Keywords = {continuing education, further education, higher education, horse diseases, horses, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary profession, veterinary services, veterinary surgeons, vets},
    Note = {ID: 1300; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {156},
    Pages = {43--48},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine factual medicine.},
    Volume = {39},
    Year = {2007}}
  • Williamson, K. K. and M. S. Davis. “Evidence-based respiratory medicine in horses..” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 23.2 (2007): 215-227. [Bibtex]
    @article{williamson_evidence-based_2007,
    Abstract = {It is clear from a review of the current scientific literature that an evidence-based approach to medical treatment of equine respiratory disease can be applied, at least in the instance of common lower respiratory diseases. In particular, there is clear evidence for efficacious treatments for recurrent airway obstruction and exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, and with the recognition of this evidence, these treatments should be the first to be considered by a practitioner when treating these conditions. The purpose of this article is not only to identify the existence of relevant high-quality studies for incorporation into an evidence-based veterinary medicine approach to patient care, but to highlight the features of those studies that should be considered when evaluating their value in individual situations.},
    Author = {Williamson, K. K. and Davis, M. S.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {animal health, animal rights, Animal Welfare, bleeding, exercise, haemorrhage, hemorrhage, horses, lung diseases, lungs, medical treatment, recurrent airway obstruction, respiratory diseases, veterinary practice},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1308; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {215--227},
    Title = {Evidence-based respiratory medicine in horses.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2007}}

2006

  • Attia, J. and J. Page. “Clinical evidence notebook: A graphic framework for teaching critical appraisal of randomised controlled trials.” Equine veterinary journal 38.1 (2006): 7-9. [Bibtex]
    @article{attia_clinical_2006,
    Abstract = {Students of evidence-based medicine often try unsuccessfully to commit to memory a particular critical appraisal framework (often lengthy), or they have to depend on pocket cards and are lost without them. We have described a pedagogic aid: a flow diagram of an RCT, which has been developed over years of teaching residents. This diagram focuses on the steps in an RCT, and by drawing arrows, it highlights the biases possible at each step. This diagram serves as a framework on which the list of critical appraisal questions can be hung and is easy to remember.},
    Author = {Attia, J. and Page, J.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Audiovisual Aids, Education, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Randomized Controlled Trials, Reproducibility of Results, Review Literature, Teaching, Veterinary/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 539; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {7--9},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {A} graphic framework for teaching critical appraisal of randomised controlled trials},
    Volume = {38},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Casal, J. and E. Mateu. “Evidence-based medicine..” Suis (zaragosa, spain) No.24 (2006): 50–59,82. [Bibtex]
    @article{casal_evidence-based_2006,
    Abstract = {This article concludes a short series of articles on epidemiology applied to pig farming, and discusses the concept of evidence-based medicine and how it is applied and used in veterinary practice.},
    Author = {Casal, J. and Mateu, E.},
    Journal = {Suis (Zaragosa, Spain)},
    Keywords = {epidemiology, pig farming, pigs, veterinary medicine},
    Note = {ID: 1330; PT: J BD: Sus scrofa; Sus; Suidae; Suiformes; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {No.24},
    Pages = {50--59,82},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine.},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Chase, K. L., R. F. DiGiacomo, and Van G. L. Hoosier. “Biomedical journals: keeping up and reading critically.” Journal of the american association for laboratory animal science : jaalas 45.5 (2006): 8-15. [Bibtex]
    @article{chase_biomedical_2006,
    Abstract = {By extrapolation from studies of physicians, knowledge and practice of laboratory animal medicine and science are expected to become progressively more outdated the longer practitioners are out of school. Keeping up with current literature and practice is a challenge that necessitates the use of many different sources of continuing education. Both veterinarians and physicians consistently list journals as the most beneficial source of new information. Accordingly, they must select from the veterinary and biomedical literature articles that report original studies and systematic reviews and recognize and respond to valid new knowledge to improve diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and maintain consistent clinical skills. Other objectives include selecting journals for general information and for information relevant or specific to one's field of research. Lastly, candidates for board certification need to read articles from journals that potentially provide the basis for questions on the examination. 'High-impact' journals should be identified, and articles should be reviewed critically. In a survey of recent candidates for laboratory animal medicine board examination, these journals included Contemporary Topics (now JAALAS), Comparative Medicine, ILAR Journal, and Laboratory Animals. Strategies for coping with the challenge of staying current with the literature include wise use of technology, journal clubs, and consultation with colleagues. A laboratory animal practitioner can become a better scientist and clinician by evaluating the research performed by others. Thorough, critical review of biomedical literature is paramount to these goals.},
    Author = {Chase, K. L. and DiGiacomo, R. F. and Hoosier, G. L. Van},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science : JAALAS},
    Keywords = {Animals, Continuing, Education, Evidence-Based Medicine, Journalism, Laboratory, Laboratory Animal Science/education/statistics \& numerical data/trends, Medical, Professional Competence, Reading, Veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {ID: 623; PUBM: Print; JID: 101269489; RF: 34; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {8--15},
    Title = {Biomedical journals: keeping up and reading critically},
    Volume = {45},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Deegen, E.. “Scientifically based equine medicine or paramedical healing promises?.” Pferdeheilkunde 22.2 (2006): 108-114. [Bibtex]
    @article{deegen_scientifically_2006,
    Abstract = {Nowadays a multitude of unconventional treatment modalities are available for the treatment of equine diseases, whose results have not been evaluated or indeed cannot be evaluated. Such unconventional treatment modalities frequently are labeled "alternative", "holistic" or "natural" and are put in contrast to the so called "school medicine". We are opposed to such a misleading nomenclature. Instead, we propose to name non-scientifically proven and unconventional treatment modalities "paramedicine". In the field of veterinary medicine the term school medicine should be replaced by "scientific veterinary medicine". This text provides several examples of paramedical treatment of equine patients that will clarify the irrational nature of these treatment modalities. We state that an expansion of veterinary medical knowledge cannot be obtained with these methods, but must be based on scientific methodology. These days higher standards are applied to the accuracy of medical conclusions obtained from published information. The critical analysis of published information has been termed evidence-based medicine. Even though empirically obtained information still plays an important role in the practice of equine medicine, in future the utilization of "external evidence", meaning scientifically obtained information, will continue to gain importance.},
    Author = {Deegen, E.},
    Journal = {Pferdeheilkunde},
    Keywords = {alternative medicine, Evidence-Based Medicine, healing, holistic medicine, horse diseases, horses, methodology, paramedicine, treatment, veterinary education, veterinary medicine, veterinary science},
    Note = {ID: 1331; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {108--114},
    Title = {Scientifically based equine medicine or paramedical healing promises?},
    Volume = {22},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Engler, K.. “Evidence based best practices pet anesthesia for healthy, fractious and ill patients.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2006. 89-91. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{engler_evidence_2006,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Engler, K.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}.},
    Keywords = {acepromazine, acetylpromazine, adrenaline, anaesthesia, anaesthetics, anesthesia, anesthetics, Animals, antibiotics, butorphanol, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Cats, chemotherapy, Chordata, Dogs, drug action, drug therapy, epinephrine, Felidae, Felis, Fissipeda, mammals, mechanism of drug action, pet animals, pets, Pets and Companion Animals, pharmacodynamics, potency, propofol, sevoflurane, small mammals, vertebrates, Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology, veterinary practice},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 483; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-20,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-7-11-January,-2006. 2006; 89-91; CF: Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 20, Orlando, Florida, USA, 7-11 January, 2006.; RE: 7 ref.; RN: 42408-82-2; 51-43-4; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA; FT; FF},
    Pages = {89--91},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Evidence based best practices pet anesthesia for healthy, fractious and ill patients},
    Url = {http://www.tnavc.org},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2006},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.tnavc.org}}
  • Association, Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine. Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine Association (EBVMA). 2006. [Bibtex]
    @book{association_evidence-based_2006,
    Author = {Association, Evidence-Based Veterinary Medicine},
    Note = {ID: 888},
    Title = {Evidence-based {Veterinary} {Medicine} {Association} ({EBVMA})},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Gay, J. M.. “Theriogenology and developments in epidemiology: future opportunities?.” Theriogenology 66.3 (2006): 526-533. [Bibtex]
    @article{gay_theriogenology_2006,
    Abstract = {The concepts and methods of the different branches of epidemiology, particularly clinical epidemiology, have much to offer the discipline of theriogenology. As with theriogenology, epidemiologic methods evolve when technological innovation enables new approaches to old problems. The recent emergence, from clinical epidemiology, of the evidence-based medicine paradigm in human medicine, and the associated developments of systematic reviews and meta-analysis, present new opportunities for collaboration and synergy between the two disciplines.},
    Author = {Gay, J. M.},
    Journal = {Theriogenology},
    Keywords = {Animals, Epidemiologic Studies, Evidence-Based Medicine, Forecasting, reproduction, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {JID: 0421510; RF: 80; 2006/05/11 [accepted]; 2006/06/23 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {526--533},
    Title = {Theriogenology and developments in epidemiology: future opportunities?},
    Volume = {66},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Givens, M. D.. “A clinical, evidence-based approach to infectious causes of infertility in beef cattle.” Theriogenology 66.3 (2006): 648-654. [Bibtex]
    @article{givens_clinical_2006,
    Abstract = {Infertility is the diminished or absent capacity to produce viable offspring. Infections that reduce ovulation rates, fertilization rates, embryonic survival rates, fetal survival rates or perinatal survival rates result in observed infertility in beef cows. Reproductive pathogens include Leptospira, Campylobacter, Hemophilus, Brucella, bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Neospora caninum. Infectious infertility can be prevented or controlled with appropriate surveillance, biosecurity, and/or vaccination. The objective of this review is to briefly summarize current scientific information to assist with adoption of surveillance methods, implementation of biosecurity and selection of appropriate commercially available vaccines..},
    Author = {Givens, M. D.},
    Journal = {Theriogenology},
    Keywords = {Alphaherpesvirinae, Animal Immunology, Animals, Apicomplexa, Artiodactyla, bacteria, beef cattle, beef cows, Bos, Bovidae, Bovine herpesvirus 1, bovine herpesviruses, Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, Brucella, Brucellaceae, Campylobacter, Campylobacteraceae, Campylobacterales, cattle, Chordata, cows, disease control, disease surveillance, disease surveys, DNA viruses, dsDNA viruses, embryos, epidemiology, Eucoccidiorida, eukaryotes, fertilization, Flaviviridae, Gracilicutes, Haemophilus, Herpesviridae, Host Resistance and Immunity, immune response, immune sensitization, immunity, immunity reactions, immunization, immunological reactions, infertility, invertebrates, Leptospira, Leptospiraceae, mammals, Neospora, Neospora caninum, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, ovulation, Pasteurellaceae, Pestivirus, positive sense ssRNA viruses, Prion Viral Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals, prokaryotes, Protozoa, Protozoan Helminth Mollusc and Arthropod Parasites of Animals, reproduction, reviews, RNA viruses, ruminants, Sarcocystidae, Sarcomastigophora, selection, Spirochaetales, ssRNA viruses, survival, Trichomonadida, Trichomonadidae, Tritrichomonas, Tritrichomonas foetus, ungulates, vaccination, Varicellovirus, vertebrates, viruses},
    Language = {English},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 476; CF: Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Society for Theriogenology, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, 22-26 August, 2006.; RE: 55 ref.; SC: 0I; 0V; 0Y; CA; BE; PA; VE; ZA; AA; XURL: URL; E-MAIL; DOI; DIGITAL-OBJECT-IDENTIFIER},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {648--654},
    Title = {A clinical, evidence-based approach to infectious causes of infertility in beef cattle},
    Url = {givenmd@vetmed.auburn.edu; http://www.sciencedirect.co./science/journal/0093691x; Get it! Cornell http://resolver.library.cornell.edu/net/openurl/?sid=SP:CABI&id=pmid:&id=doi%3a10.1016%2fj.theriogenology.2006.04.021&issn=0093-691X&isbn=&volume=66&issue=3&spage=648&pages=648-654&date=2006&title=Theriogenology%20&atitle=A%20clinical%2c%20evidence-based%20approach%20to%20infectious%20causes%20of%20infertility%20in%20beef%20cattle.&aulast=Givens&pid=%3Cauthor%3EGivens%2c%20M%20D%3C%2Fauthor%3E%3CAN%3E20063168799%3C%2FAN%3E},
    Volume = {66},
    Year = {2006},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {givenmd@vetmed.auburn.edu;%20http://www.sciencedirect.co./science/journal/0093691x;%20Get%20it!%20Cornell%20http://resolver.library.cornell.edu/net/openurl/?sid=SP:CABI&id=pmid:&id=doi%3a10.1016%2fj.theriogenology.2006.04.021&issn=0093-691X&isbn=&volume=66&issue=3&spage=648&pages=648-654&date=2006&title=Theriogenology%20&atitle=A%20clinical%2c%20evidence-based%20approach%20to%20infectious%20causes%20of%20infertility%20in%20beef%20cattle.&aulast=Givens&pid=%3Cauthor%3EGivens%2c%20M%20D%3C%2Fauthor%3E%3CAN%3E20063168799%3C%2FAN%3E}}
  • Habacher, G., M. H. Pittler, and E. Ernst. “Effectiveness of acupuncture in veterinary medicine: systematic review.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 20.3 (2006): 480-488. [Bibtex]
    @article{habacher_effectiveness_2006,
    Abstract = {Acupuncture is a popular complementary treatment option in human medicine. Increasingly, owners also seek acupuncture for their animals. The aim of the systematic review reported here was to summarize and assess the clinical evidence for or against the effectiveness of acupuncture in veterinary medicine. Systematic searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, Cinahl, Japana Centra Revuo Medicina and Chikusan Bunken Kensaku. Hand-searches included conference proceedings, bibliographies, and contact with experts and veterinary acupuncture associations. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication. All controlled clinical trials testing acupuncture in any condition of domestic animals were included. Studies using laboratory animals were excluded. Titles and abstracts of identified articles were read, and hard copies were obtained. Inclusion and exclusion of studies, data extraction, and validation were performed independently by two reviewers. Methodologic quality was evaluated by means of the Jadad score. Fourteen randomized controlled trials and 17 nonrandomized controlled trials met our criteria and were, therefore, included. The methodologic quality of these trials was variable but, on average, was low. For cutaneous pain and diarrhea, encouraging evidence exists that warrants further investigation in rigorous trials. Single studies reported some positive intergroup differences for spinal cord injury, Cushing's syndrome, lung function, hepatitis, and rumen acidosis. These trials require independent replication. On the basis of the findings of this systematic review, there is no compelling evidence to recommend or reject acupuncture for any condition in domestic animals. Some encouraging data do exist that warrant further investigation in independent rigorous trials.},
    Author = {Habacher, G. and Pittler, M. H. and Ernst, E.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Keywords = {Acupuncture Analgesia/veterinary, Acupuncture Therapy/veterinary, Animals, cattle, Dogs, horses, Musculoskeletal Diseases/therapy/veterinary, Pain/therapy/veterinary, Randomized Controlled Trials, Sheep, Swine, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {ID: 867; PUBM: Print; JID: 8708660; RF: 48; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {480--488},
    Title = {Effectiveness of acupuncture in veterinary medicine: systematic review},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Hardin, L. E. and S. Robertson. “Learning evidence-based veterinary medicine through development of a critically appraised topic.” Journal of veterinary medical education 33.3 (2006): 474-478. [Bibtex]
    @article{hardin_learning_2006,
    Abstract = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine is a relatively new field of study. Increased knowledge of medicine coupled with the increased ability of computers and other electronic devices present overwhelming information. The critically appraised topic (CAT) is one method to gather and evaluate information related to a clinical question. CATs in informatics are short summaries of evidence, usually found through literature searches, in response to a specifically stated, clinically oriented problem or question. This article describes a study in which each first-year veterinary student developed a CAT as a class project. The results of this project indicate that students were able to successfully develop CATs and that this exercise helped them understand evidence-based veterinary medicine concepts. Though some modification in this project will be made in the future, overall it was a worthwhile effort and will remain as an activity in the course.},
    Author = {Hardin, L. E. and Robertson, S.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Medical Education},
    Keywords = {Animals, Curriculum, Education, Evidence-Based Medicine/education, Humans, Teaching/methods, Veterinary/standards/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Note = {ID: 620; PUBM: Print; JID: 7610519; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {474--478},
    Title = {Learning evidence-based veterinary medicine through development of a critically appraised topic},
    Volume = {33},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Kastelic, J. P.. “Critical evaluation of scientific articles and other sources of information: an introduction to evidence-based veterinary medicine.” Theriogenology 66.3 (2006): 534-542. [Bibtex]
    @article{kastelic_critical_2006,
    Abstract = {The purpose of this paper is to briefly review key concepts regarding critical reading of the scientific literature to make informed decisions, in the context of evidence-based veterinary medicine. Key concepts are reviewed, based on the broader experience in human medicine, with adaptations, as indicated, to veterinary medicine. That a paper has been published in a peer-reviewed journal does not guarantee its credibility; guidelines are given regarding the general merit of different kinds of articles, as well as checklists and criteria that can be used to assess a paper. Specific study designs, their merits and limitations, are briefly discussed. Standard numerical indices for assessment of studies involving treatments and for assessments of diagnostic tests are summarized. Criteria for assessing drug trials are presented. The principles of statistical analysis are described, including practical considerations and common errors. Finally, numerous sources of bias are reviewed.},
    Author = {Kastelic, J. P.},
    Journal = {Theriogenology},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 541; PUBM: Print-Electronic; DEP: 20060523; JID: 0421510; RF: 16; 2006/05/23 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {534--542},
    Title = {Critical evaluation of scientific articles and other sources of information: an introduction to evidence-based veterinary medicine},
    Volume = {66},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Kelton, D. F.. “Epidemiology: a foundation for dairy production medicine.” Veterinary clinics of north america: food animal practice 22.1 (2006): 21-33. [Bibtex]
    @article{kelton_epidemiology:_2006,
    Abstract = {Epidemiology in dairy production medicine strives to optimize production through the elimination and control of disease and the implementation of management practices that promote animal health, welfare, productivity, and profitability. Epidemiology in dairy production medicine is a broad discipline that encompasses many inter-related areas of activity. Quantitative epidemiology includes a range of activities, from counting clinical cases to the development of complex hierarchic decision models. Evaluation and interpretation of "tests" applied at various levels of the health management cycle serve as the basis for diagnostic and monitoring systems. Critical evaluation of the published scientific literature in the practice of evidence-based veterinary medicine facilitates the appropriate use of knowledge in support of health management decisions.},
    Author = {Kelton, D. F.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Animal Welfare, Cattle Diseases/epidemiology/prevention \& control, Cattle/physiology, Dairying/methods/standards, Epidemiologic Methods/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Lactation/physiology, Reproduction/physiology, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {ID: 578; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511905; RF: 35; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {21--33},
    Title = {Epidemiology: a foundation for dairy production medicine},
    Volume = {22},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Kochevar, D. T. and V. Fajt. “Evidence-based decision making in small animal therapeutics.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 36.5 (2006): 943-959. [Bibtex]
    @article{kochevar_evidence-based_2006,
    Abstract = {With a growing number of evidence-based resources being developed for use in veterinary medicine, the time is right for academicians, practitioners, and students to embrace the positive elements of evidence-based veterinary medicine. Clinical pharmacologists, more than most, have all the skills required to use an evidence-based approach effectively for the benefit of patients and the advancement of the profession.},
    Author = {Kochevar, D. T. and Fajt, V.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small animal practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Decision Support Techniques, Evidence-Based Medicine, Physician's Practice Patterns, Veterinary Drugs/administration \& dosage, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {ID: 536; PUBM: Print; JID: 7809942; 0 (Veterinary Drugs); RF: 36; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {943--959},
    Title = {Evidence-based decision making in small animal therapeutics},
    Volume = {36},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Kurtz, S.. “Teaching and learning communication in veterinary medicine.” Journal of veterinary medical education 33.1 (2006): 11-19. [Bibtex]
    @article{kurtz_teaching_2006,
    Abstract = {Drawing on extensive evidence and experience in human medicine, this article offers a practical conceptual framework for thinking more precisely about how to teach and learn communication systematically and intentionally in veterinary medicine. The overarching goal is to promote the development of communication programs so as to improve communication in veterinary practice to a professional level of competence. A three-part conceptual framework is presented that first explores the rationale behind teaching and learning communication, including the evidence base regarding the impact of communication on clinician-client interactions and outcomes of care and the research on teaching and learning communication skills in medicine. The second part considers four ways to conceptualize what to teach and learn, as explicated by (a) the domains of communication in veterinary medicine; (b) ''first principles'' of effective communication; (c) evidence-based goals or outcomes for communication programs; and (d) delineation and definition of the specific individual skills that research evidence supports, as presented in the Calgary-Cambridge Guides. The last part of the conceptual framework examines how to teach communication, including the use of models, a primary focus on skill development as the backbone of communication programs, and the value of other methods supported by the evidence, such as simulated patients, videotape, small groups, and feedback and facilitation skills. Communication impacts the clinician- client interaction and outcomes of care in very significant ways. Communication can and should be taught and learned with as much rigor as other aspects of clinical competence. Veterinary programs at all levels should include the teaching of communication.},
    Author = {Kurtz, S.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Medical Education},
    Language = {eng},
    Note = {ID: 540; PUBM: Print; JID: 7610519; RF: 30; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {11--19},
    Title = {Teaching and learning communication in veterinary medicine},
    Volume = {33},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Mair, T. S.. “Evidence-based medicine and clinical audit: what progress in equine practice?.” Equine veterinary education 18.1 (2006): 2-4. [Bibtex]
    @article{mair_evidence-based_2006,
    Author = {Mair, T. S.},
    Journal = {Equine Veterinary Education},
    Month = feb,
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {2--4},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine and clinical audit: what progress in equine practice?},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Marr, C. M. and J. R. Newton. “Clinical evidence notebook: Clinical evidence articles in Equine Veterinary Journal: progress since inception.” Equine veterinary journal 38.2 (2006): 110-112. [Bibtex]
    @article{marr_clinical_2006,
    Author = {Marr, C. M. and Newton, J. R.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, horses, Periodicals/standards/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {ID: 537; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {110--112},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {Clinical} evidence articles in {Equine} {Veterinary} {Journal}: progress since inception},
    Volume = {38},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Marshall, J. C.. “Knowles Memorial Lecture: Optimizing strategies beyond evidence-based medicine: integration of evidence, inference and experience.” San Antionio, TX: American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, 2006. 1-8. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{marshall_knowles_2006,
    Address = {San Antionio, TX},
    Author = {Marshall, J. C.},
    Booktitle = {Scientific {Proceedings}. {Veterinary} {Emergency} and {Critical} {Care} {Society} and {American} {College} of {Veterinary} {Emergency} and {Critical} {Care}},
    Note = {ID: 624},
    Pages = {1--8},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care},
    Title = {Knowles {Memorial} {Lecture}: {Optimizing} strategies beyond evidence-based medicine: integration of evidence, inference and experience},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Michell, B.. “Clinical trials and tribulations: dissecting evidence-based medicine..” Veterinary times 36.2 (2006): 14. [Bibtex]
    @article{michell_clinical_2006,
    Author = {Michell, B.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Times},
    Keywords = {animal health, Attitudes, beliefs, clinical trials, Randomized Controlled Trials, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice ER},
    Note = {ID: 1332; PT: J},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {14},
    Title = {Clinical trials and tribulations: dissecting evidence-based medicine.},
    Volume = {36},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Mountford, D.. “The development, clinical application and evidence based outcomes of stem cell therapy for tendon and ligament injuries.” Pferdeheilkunde 22.5 (2006): 655-658. [Bibtex]
    @article{mountford_development_2006,
    Author = {Mountford, D.},
    Journal = {Pferdeheilkunde},
    Keywords = {Animals, Animal Surgery and Non drug Therapy, Chordata, Equidae, Equus, eukaryotes, horses, ligaments, mammals, musculoskeletal anomalies, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Perissodactyla, skeletomuscular anomalies, stem cells, tendons, trauma, traumas, ungulates, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 475; CF: ESpoM Aachen 2006. Progress in Equine Veterinary Sports Medicine, 23-26 August 2006, Aachen, Germany.; RE: 15 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {655--658},
    Title = {The development, clinical application and evidence based outcomes of stem cell therapy for tendon and ligament injuries},
    Url = {http://www.pferdeheilkunde.de/},
    Volume = {22},
    Year = {2006},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.pferdeheilkunde.de/}}
  • Niemiec, B. A.. “Evidence based antibiotic therapy in veterinary dentistry.” Orlando, FL: Eastern State Veterinary Association, 2006. 332-334. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{niemiec_evidence_2006,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Niemiec, B. A.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {Animals, antibiotics, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Cats, chemotherapy, Chordata, dentistry, Dogs, drug therapy, Felidae, Felis, Fissipeda, gingivitis, gum disease, mammals, osteomyelitis, periodontal diseases, periodontitis, Pesticides and Drugs Control, Pets and Companion Animals, Prion Viral Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens of Animals, small mammals, tooth diseases, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 485; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-20,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-7-11-January,-2006. 2006; 332-334; CF: Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 20, Orlando, Florida, USA, 7-11 January, 2006.; RE: 10 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA; FT; FF},
    Pages = {332--334},
    Publisher = {Eastern State Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Evidence based antibiotic therapy in veterinary dentistry},
    Url = {http://www.tnavc.org},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2006},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.tnavc.org}}
  • Petrie, A. and P. Watson. Statistics for veterinary and animal science.. 2nd ed. Oxord ; Ames, IA: Blackwell Publishing, 2006. [Bibtex]
    @book{petrie_statistics_2006,
    Abstract = {This is the second edition of a book first published in 1999. It provides the reader with the necessary information to handle numerical data and critically appraise the statistical methodology in the literature in the fields of veterinary and animal science. The emphasis is on understanding underlying concepts and interpreting computer output correctly; to this end numerous worked real examples are presented to help the reader develop an understanding of the procedures involved. Although many of the chapters in the first edition have only been changed slightly, some exercises and further explanations have been added to make the book more comprehensive. New material on several advanced regression techniques has been added and there is also a new chapter describing the importance of statistics in the practice of evidence-based medicine. Glossaries of notation and of terms are available. Also included with this edition is a CD containing the data sets used as examples in the text. This book would be useful to veterinary and animal science students, researchers and practitioners.},
    Address = {Oxord ; Ames, IA},
    Author = {Petrie, A. and Watson, P.},
    Edition = {2nd},
    Isbn = {1-4051-2781-3 (pbk. : alk. paper)},
    Keywords = {analysis, analytical methods, analytical techniques, animal science, books, data processing, ER, statistical anaylsis, veterinary medicine, zoology},
    Note = {ID: 1321; PT: B},
    Number = {Ed.2},
    Publisher = {Blackwell Publishing},
    Title = {Statistics for veterinary and animal science.},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Polzin, D.. “Treating canine kidney disease: an evidence-based approach.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2006. 681-683. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{polzin_treating_2006,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Polzin, D.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {angiotensin converting enzyme, Animals, Animal Surgery and Non drug Therapy, antihypertensive agents, binding agents, calcitriol, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, chemotherapy, Chordata, diet therapy, Dogs, drug therapy, enzyme inhibitors, erythropoietin, Fissipeda, high blood pressure, hypertension, kidney diseases, kidney disorders, mammals, nephropathy, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, phosphorus, Randomized Controlled Trials, renal diseases, small mammals, special diets, therapeutic diets, therapeutic nutrition, therapeutics, therapy, vertebrates, Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 481; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-20,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-7-11-January,-2006. 2006; 681-683; CF: Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 20, Orlando, Florida, USA, 7-11 January, 2006.; RE: 10 ref.; RN: 32222-06-3; 11096-26-7; 7723-14-0; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA; FT; FF},
    Pages = {681--683},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Treating canine kidney disease: an evidence-based approach},
    Url = {http://www.tnavc.org},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2006},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.tnavc.org}}
  • Polzin, D.. “Treating feline kidney disease: an evidence-based approach.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2006. 678-680. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{polzin_treating_2006-1,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Polzin, D.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {acidosis, angiotensin converting enzyme, Animals, Animal Surgery and Non drug Therapy, antihypertensive agents, calcitriol, carnivores, Cats, chemotherapy, Chordata, creatinine, diet therapy, drug therapy, enzyme inhibitors, erythropoietin, Felidae, Felis, Fissipeda, high blood pressure, hyperphosphataemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypertension, hypokalaemia, hypokalemia, hypokaliaemia, kidney diseases, kidney disorders, mammals, nephropathy, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, phosphorus, potassium, potassium citrate, Randomized Controlled Trials, renal diseases, small mammals, sodium bicarbonate, special diets, therapeutic diets, therapeutic nutrition, vertebrates, Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 482; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-20,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-7-11-January,-2006. 2006; 678-680; CF: Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 20, Orlando, Florida, USA, 7-11 January, 2006.; RN: 32222-06-3; 60-72-5; 11096-26-7; 7723-14-0; 7440-09-7; 144-55-8; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA; FT; FF},
    Pages = {678--680},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Treating feline kidney disease: an evidence-based approach},
    Url = {http://www.tnavc.org},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2006},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.tnavc.org}}
  • Ramey, D.. “Shoeing and trimming on the equine forelimb with respect to common clinical indications: an evidence-based review.” Australian equine veterinarian 25.2 (2006): 12-18. [Bibtex]
    @article{ramey_shoeing_2006,
    Author = {Ramey, D.},
    Journal = {Australian Equine Veterinarian},
    Keywords = {animal health, Animal Health and Hygiene General, Animals, Chordata, Equidae, Equus, feet, hooves, horses, ligaments, mammals, Perissodactyla, shoeing, Sport Animals, techniques, Techniques and Methodology, tendons, ungulates, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 480; CF: AVA Conference 2006: Equine Proceedings, Hobart, Australia, 21-26 May 2006.; RE: 45 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {12--18},
    Title = {Shoeing and trimming on the equine forelimb with respect to common clinical indications: an evidence-based review},
    Url = {www.aeva.ava.com.au},
    Volume = {25},
    Year = {2006},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {www.aeva.ava.com.au}}
  • Ramey, D. W.. “Laminitis: an evidence-based approach to treatment..” Australian equine veterinarian 25.3 (2006): 44-50. [Bibtex]
    @article{ramey_laminitis:_2006,
    Author = {Ramey, D. W.},
    Journal = {Australian Equine Veterinarian},
    Keywords = {acepromazine, acetylpromazine, acupuncture, antihistamines, antihistaminics, bleeding, cold therapy, complementary and alternative medicine, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethyl sulphoxide, disease prevention, DMSO, feet, fentanyl, foot diseases, haemorrhage, hemorrhage, heparin, heparin sulfate, heparin sulphate, hooves, horses, isoxsuprine, laminitis, nerve block, nitroglycerin, non-steroidal antiinflammatory agents, NSAIDS, pathogenesis, phlebotomy, treatment},
    Note = {ID: 1324; PT: J; CT: AVA Conference Equine Proceedings 2006. BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates; eukaryotes ER},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {44--50},
    Title = {Laminitis: an evidence-based approach to treatment.},
    Volume = {25},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Ramey, D. W.. “Chiropractic: an evidence-based approach..” Australian equine veterinarian 25.2 (2006): 19-23. [Bibtex]
    @article{ramey_chiropractic:_2006,
    Author = {Ramey, D. W.},
    Journal = {Australian Equine Veterinarian},
    Keywords = {arthropathy, chiropractice, horses, joint diseases, joints (animal), spinal diseases, spine, therapeutics, therapy, veterinary medicine},
    Note = {ID: 1328; PT: J; CT: AVA Conference 2006: Equine Proceedings, Hobart, Australia, 21-26 May 2006. BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {19--23},
    Title = {Chiropractic: an evidence-based approach.},
    Volume = {25},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Ramey, D. W.. “Colic: an evidence-based approach to the decision for surgery.” Australian equine veterinarian 25.3 (2006): 50-53. [Bibtex]
    @article{ramey_colic:_2006,
    Author = {Ramey, D. W.},
    Journal = {Australian Equine Veterinarian},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {50--53},
    Title = {Colic: an evidence-based approach to the decision for surgery},
    Volume = {25},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Reneau, J. K. and J. Lukas. “Using statistical process control methods to improve herd performance.” Veterinary clinics of north america: food animal practice 22.1 (2006): 171-193. [Bibtex]
    @article{reneau_using_2006,
    Abstract = {Statistical process control (SPC) is a set of analytic methods that uses the theory of variation as a means of explaining with statistical certainty when process performance is improving, staying the same, or getting worse. SPC techniques have been used successfully for 80 years in manufacturing as a quality management tool. It is apparent that these techniques can be applied equally well to livestock production systems. The availability of large amounts of automatically collected data, the advances in computer capability, and the obvious need for more timely fact-based information for day-to-day management make SPC application the next step in improving herd management quality.},
    Author = {Reneau, J. K. and Lukas, J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animal Husbandry/standards/statistics \& numerical data, Animals, Decision Making, Evidence-Based Medicine, Quality Control, Software, Statistics/methods/standards, Veterinary Medicine/statistics \& numerical data},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {ID: 542; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511905; RF: 32; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {171--193},
    Title = {Using statistical process control methods to improve herd performance},
    Volume = {22},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Schulz, K. S., J. L. Cook, A. S. Kapatkin, and D. C. Brown. “Evidence-based surgery: time for change.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 35.8 (2006): 697-699. [Bibtex]
    @article{schulz_evidence-based_2006,
    Author = {Schulz, K. S. and Cook, J. L. and Kapatkin, A. S. and Brown, D. C.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Decision Making, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Surgery, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary/economics/standards/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {ID: 622; PUBM: Print; JID: 8113214; ppublish},
    Number = {8},
    Pages = {697--699},
    Title = {Evidence-based surgery: time for change},
    Volume = {35},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Weiner, S. J.. “Clinical evidence notebook: From research evidence to context: the challenge of individualising care.” Equine veterinary journal 38.3 (2006): 195-196. [Bibtex]
    @article{weiner_clinical_2006,
    Author = {Weiner, S. J.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Chordata, clinical aspects, Decision Making, Hominidae, Homo, human diseases, Human Health and Biology General, mammals, man, medical treatment, patient care, physicians, Primates, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 486; RE: 12 ref.; SC: 0I; 1T; CA; HE; AG; VE; ZA},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {195--196},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {From} research evidence to context: the challenge of individualising care},
    Volume = {38},
    Year = {2006}}
  • Wynn, S. G.. “Evidence-based herbal medicine.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2006. 74-76. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{wynn_evidence-based_2006,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Wynn, S. G.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {acetaminophen, Agaricales, Alliaceae, Allium, Allium sativum, Amanita, Amanitaceae, Amanita phalloides, angiosperms, Animals, Aphyllophorales, Artiodactyla, Asteraceae, Asterales, Basidiomycotina, birds, Bos, Boswellia, Bovidae, Burseraceae, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Cats, cattle, Chickens, cholesterol, Chordata, Commiphora, dicotyledons, Dilleniales, Dogs, domesticated birds, drug plants, Echinacea, Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea purpurea, Equidae, Equus, Eumycota, Fabaceae, Fabales, feed conversion efficiency, Felidae, Felis, Fissipeda, fowls, fungi, Galliformes, Gallus, Gallus gallus, garlic, Gesneriaceae, ginger, Glycyrrhiza, Glycyrrhiza glabra, growth rate, haematuria, hematuria, herbal drugs, herbal medicines, hogs, horses, immunity, Liliaceae, Liliales, mammals, medicinal herbs, medicinal plants, Melaleuca, Melaleuca alternifolia, monocotyledons, Myrtaceae, Myrtales, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Non food Non feed Plant Products, officinal plants, Paeonia, Paeoniaceae, Paeonia lactiflora, Paeoniales, paracetamol, Perissodactyla, pet animals, pets, Pets and Companion Animals, Phasianidae, pigs, plants, Polyporaceae, Polyporus, Poriales, poultry, Randomized Controlled Trials, Rehmannia, Rehmannia glutinosa, ruminants, Sapindales, Scrophulariaceae, Scrophulariales, silymarin, small mammals, Spermatophyta, struvite, Suidae, Suiformes, Sus, Sus scrofa, Swine, traditional Chinese medicines, triacylglycerols, triglycerides, ungulates, vertebrates, Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology, Zingiber, Zingiberaceae, Zingiberales, Zingiber officinale},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 484; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-20,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-7-11-January,-2006. 2006; 74-76; CF: Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 20, Orlando, Florida, USA, 7-11 January, 2006.; RN: 103-90-2; 57-88-5; SC: 0I; 7D; 7A; 5C; 7Y; CA; HE; TR; VE; ZA; FT; FF},
    Pages = {74--76},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Evidence-based herbal medicine},
    Url = {http://www.tnavc.org},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2006},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.tnavc.org}}

2005

  • “Seeking the truth: the evidence-based approach to veterinary medicine.” The veterinary record 156.17 (2005): 528-530. [Bibtex]
    @article{_seeking_2005,
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 552; PUBM: Print; JID: 0031164; ppublish},
    Number = {17},
    Pages = {528--530},
    Title = {Seeking the truth: the evidence-based approach to veterinary medicine},
    Volume = {156},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Aragon, C. L. and S. C. Budsberg. “Applications of evidence-based medicine: cranial cruciate ligament injury repair in the dog.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 34.2 (2005): 93-98. [Bibtex]
    @article{aragon_applications_2005,
    Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the literature reporting surgical interventions pertaining to canine cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) injury using an evidence-based medicine paradigm. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic literature review. METHODS: An on-line bibliographic search through Medline, PubMed, Veterinary Information Network, and Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau Abstracts was performed during August 2004. Two hundred and forty resources of information were identified. Studies were compared and evaluated with regard to study design (retrospective, prospective, randomization), surgical technique, short- and long-term follow-up, and evidence classification. RESULTS: Twenty-eight resources qualified to assist with evidence classification. No class I or class II studies were present, 5 studies were categorized as a class III and 23 studies were categorized as a class IV. Seventeen studies were retrospectively designed and 11 studies were prospectively designed. Proposed results ranged from a wide variety of subjective findings including clinical impression, radiographic analysis, synovial fluid analysis, gross pathology, and histopathology. Objective results, although infrequent, included force plate analysis and cadaveric biomechanical testing. CONCLUSIONS: At this time, the application of evidence-based medicine in analyzing the current available evidence suggests that there is not a single surgical procedure that has enough data to recommend that it can consistently return dogs to normal function after CCL injury. The requirement for assessing and categorizing the available evidence becomes increasingly important as more data becomes available and the quality of research improves. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: An evidence-based medicine paradigm did not provide sufficient evidence favoring 1 surgical technique for management of canine CCL injury.},
    Author = {Aragon, C. L. and Budsberg, S. C.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Animal/surgery, Anterior Cruciate Ligament/injuries/surgery, Dogs/injuries/surgery, Evidence-Based Medicine, Lameness, Operative/methods/veterinary, Retrospective Studies, Stifle/injuries, Surgical Procedures, Treatment Outcome},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 609; LR: 20061107; PUBM: Print; JID: 8113214; CIN: Vet Surg. 2005 Sep-Oct;34(5):536; author reply 536. PMID: 16266350; RF: 38; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {93--98},
    Title = {Applications of evidence-based medicine: cranial cruciate ligament injury repair in the dog},
    Volume = {34},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Arlt, S. and W. Heuwieser. “Evidence based veterinary medicine.” Dtw.deutsche tierarztliche wochenschrift 112.4 (2005): 146-148. [Bibtex]
    @article{arlt_evidence_2005,
    Abstract = {The characteristics and advantages of evidence based (human-) medicine (EBM) are introduced. By summarising information and analysing the results of different clinical trials relating to a specific topic by expert commissions concise and advanced conclusions can be formulated. That kind of evidence (certainty that results are true) increases the explanatory power of a single trial by far. Precondition for the development of an evidence based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is an improvement of the quality, design and implementation of clinical trials. Continuous publication of these conclusions (EBVM) can support the practitioner or clinician in the decision making process for an optimal treatment. Furthermore the implementation of state of the art intervention strategy is assured.},
    Author = {Arlt, S. and Heuwieser, W.},
    Journal = {DTW.Deutsche tierarztliche Wochenschrift},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Randomized Controlled Trials/standards/veterinary, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {ger},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 550; LR: 20061115; PUBM: Print; JID: 7706565; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {146--148},
    Title = {Evidence based veterinary medicine},
    Volume = {112},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Devereaux, P. J., M. Bhandari, V. M. Montori, B. J. Manns, W. A. Ghali, and G. H. Guyatt. “Clinical evidence notebook: Double blind, you are the weakest link–goodbye!.” Equine veterinary journal 37.6 (2005): 557-558. [Bibtex]
    @article{devereaux_clinical_2005,
    Author = {Devereaux, P. J. and Bhandari, M. and Montori, V. M. and Manns, B. J. and Ghali, W. A. and Guyatt, G. H.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, clinical trials, Double-Blind Method, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Research Design/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 587; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {6},
    Pages = {557--558},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {Double} blind, you are the weakest link--goodbye!},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Evans, R.. How to read and evaluate a journal article. 2005. [Bibtex]
    @book{evans_how_2005,
    Author = {Evans, R.},
    Month = oct,
    Title = {How to read and evaluate a journal article},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Ferrer, L.. “Canine atopic dermatitis: evidence based dermatology.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2005. 244-246. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{ferrer_canine_2005,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Ferrer, L.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {age differences, allergen specific immunotherapy, Animals, antihistaminics, atopic dermatitis, Canidae, canine atopic dermatitis, Canis, carnivores, Chordata, clinical aspects, diagnosis, Diagnosis of Animal Diseases, Dogs, essential fatty acids, Fissipeda, glucocorticoids, histopathology, immunotherapy, lesions, mammals, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, non steroidal antiinflammatory agents, pathogenesis, Pets and Companion Animals, sex differences, skin, skin diseases, small mammals, treatment, vertebrates, Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 491; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-19,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-8-12-January,-2005. 2005; 244-246; CF: Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 19, Orlando, Florida, USA, 8-12 January, 2005.; RE: 1 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA; FT; FF},
    Pages = {244--246},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Canine atopic dermatitis: evidence based dermatology},
    Url = {http://www.navc.org},
    Volume = {19},
    Year = {2005},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.navc.org}}
  • Hammick, M. R.. “Evidence-informed education in the health care science professions.” Journal of veterinary medical education 32.4 (2005): 399-403. [Bibtex]
    @article{hammick_evidence-informed_2005,
    Abstract = {The use of evidence to inform the practice and policy of professional education in the health care sciences is taking on an increasingly important role alongside the use of more traditional types of knowledge. It is an addition to the repertoire in this and many professions that draw on social-science discipline knowledge. In the field of health care science professional education, the Best Evidence Medical Education Collaboration (BEME) leads the movement toward evidence-informed practice. It is a movement not without controversy, and lively debate on epistemological and practical issues is in progress. With publication of the first BEME Reviews in 2005, this debate will be extended. We can expect energetic and healthy commentaries on both the review process and the substantive findings. All this will make a valuable contribution to an important aspect of professional education practice and policy that is here to stay.},
    Author = {Hammick, M. R.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Medical Education},
    Keywords = {Animals, Attitudes, Education, Evidence-Based Medicine, Health Knowledge, Humans, Practice, Veterinarians/psychology, Veterinary Medicine/standards, Veterinary/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Note = {ID: 538; PUBM: Print; JID: 7610519; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {399--403},
    Title = {Evidence-informed education in the health care science professions},
    Volume = {32},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Harari, J.. “Evidence-based medicine and cranial cruciate ligament repairs.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 34.5 (2005): 536; author reply 536. [Bibtex]
    @article{harari_evidence-based_2005,
    Author = {Harari, J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Anterior Cruciate Ligament/injuries/surgery, Dogs/injuries/surgery, Evidence-Based Medicine, Osteotomy/economics/veterinary, United States, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 543; LR: 20061107; PUBM: Print; JID: 8113214; CON: Vet Surg. 2005 Mar-Apr;34(2):93-8. PMID: 15860098; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {536; author reply 536},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine and cranial cruciate ligament repairs},
    Volume = {34},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Hektoen, L.. “Review of the current involvement of homeopathy in veterinary practice and research.” The veterinary record 157.8 (2005): 224-229. [Bibtex]
    @article{hektoen_review_2005,
    Abstract = {Homeopathy has become the focus of increasing interest and use as a complementary and alternative treatment for both human and animal disease. However, from the point of view of academic medicine, this type of therapy is controversial. The use of highly diluted remedies cannot be reconciled with the scientific theories on which the current understanding of disease and its treatment is based, and clinical research in the field is considered to be neither extensive enough nor of a high enough standard to determine whether homeopathic treatments are clinically effective. Animals have no choice in their treatment and are dependent on the judgements of their owners and their therapists. There is therefore a need for information about the effects and consequences of the use of alternative therapies. This paper discusses the use of homeopathy in the treatment of animal disease from the point of view of academic veterinary medicine, and the various approaches to research in this field, with an emphasis on the randomised clinical trial. It also discusses the role of the placebo response and the natural resolution of disease in the clinical evaluation of homeopathic treatment.},
    Author = {Hektoen, L.},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animal Diseases/therapy, Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Homeopathy/methods, Research, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary Medicine/methods},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 546; PUBM: Print; JID: 0031164; CIN: Vet Rec. 2005 Sep 10;157(11):327. PMID: 16155245; CIN: Vet Rec. 2005 Sep 24;157(13):390-1; author reply 391-2. PMID: 16183901; CIN: Vet Rec. 2005 Sep 24;157(13):391; author reply 391-2. PMID: 16183903; RF: 72; ppublish},
    Number = {8},
    Pages = {224--229},
    Title = {Review of the current involvement of homeopathy in veterinary practice and research},
    Volume = {157},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Kronfeld, D.. “Strong evidence and the systematic review..” Journal of equine veterinary science 25.5 (2005): 231-232. [Bibtex]
    @article{kronfeld_strong_2005,
    Abstract = {In evidence-based medicine, the strongest evidence is preferably provided by a systematic review. This document usually turns out to be a meta-analysis or a quasi-meta-analysis of randomized or quasi-randomized blind trials. The prototypes are the famous and revered Cochrane Collaborations. The application of systematic reviews in horses is discussed.},
    Author = {Kronfeld, D.},
    Journal = {Journal of Equine Veterinary Science},
    Keywords = {drug therapy, evidenced-based medicine, exercise, experimental design, horses, insulin, methodology, osteoarthritis, ovarian diseases, Randomized Controlled Trials, systematic reviews, therapy, trials},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 1337; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {231--232},
    Title = {Strong evidence and the systematic review.},
    Volume = {25},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Leeflang, M.. “Evidence-based medicine in the veterinary practice..” Tijdschrift voor diergeneeskunde 130.2 (2005): 48-49. [Bibtex]
    @article{leeflang_evidence-based_2005,
    Author = {Leeflang, M.},
    Journal = {Tijdschrift voor diergeneeskunde},
    Keywords = {ER, evidence based medicine, methodology, veterinary practice},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 1336; PT: J},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {48--49},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine in the veterinary practice.},
    Volume = {130},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Meurs, K. M.. “Evidence-based approach to treatment of ventricular arrhythmias.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2005. 115. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{meurs_evidence-based_2005,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Meurs, K. M.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {Animals, arrhythmia, atenolol, Canidae, Canis, cardiology, carnivores, Chordata, Dogs, Fissipeda, heart, mammals, medical treatment, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, Professions Practice and Service, small animal practice, small mammals, vertebrates, veterinary practice},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 490; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-19,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-8-12-January,-2005. 2005; 115; CF: Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 19, Orlando, Florida, USA, 8-12 January, 2005.; RN: 29122-68-7; SC: 0I; CA; HE; VE; ZA; FT; FF},
    Pages = {115},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Evidence-based approach to treatment of ventricular arrhythmias},
    Url = {http://www.navc.org},
    Volume = {19},
    Year = {2005},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.navc.org}}
  • Milstein, M.. “Is there a common theme in the alternative medicine debate?.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 226.8 (2005): 1294; author reply 1296–7. [Bibtex]
    @article{milstein_is_2005,
    Author = {Milstein, M.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Complementary Therapies/ethics/methods/standards/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine/ethics/methods/standards, Randomized Controlled Trials/veterinary, Treatment Outcome, United States, Veterinary Medicine/ethics/methods/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 560; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; CON: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2005 Feb 15;226(4):516-20. PMID: 15742689; ppublish},
    Number = {8},
    Pages = {1294; author reply 1296--7},
    Title = {Is there a common theme in the alternative medicine debate?},
    Volume = {226},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Mintiens, K., H. Laevens, F. Boelaert, D. Verloo, J. Dewulf, and D. Maes. “Applied veterinary epidemiological research in veterinary science and public health..” Vlaams diergeneeskundig tijdschrift 74.1(A) (2005): 54-63. [Bibtex]
    @article{mintiens_applied_2005,
    Author = {Mintiens, K. and Laevens, H. and Boelaert, F. and Verloo, D. and Dewulf, J. and Maes, D.},
    Journal = {Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift},
    Keywords = {Animal diseases, ER, evidence based medicine, human diseases, prevention, veterinary epidemiology, veterinary science},
    Note = {ID: 1334; PT: J},
    Number = {1(A)},
    Pages = {54--63},
    Title = {Applied veterinary epidemiological research in veterinary science and public health.},
    Volume = {74},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Parkin, T. D., P. E. Brown, N. P. French, and K. L. Morgan. “Clinical evidence notebook: Cooking the books or simply getting the best out of the data? Assessing the nature of the relationship between variables.” Equine veterinary journal 37.3 (2005): 189-191. [Bibtex]
    @article{parkin_clinical_2005,
    Author = {Parkin, T. D. and Brown, P. E. and French, N. P. and Morgan, K. L.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Data Interpretation, Evidence-Based Medicine, horses, Humans, Linear Models, Logistic Models, Models, Research Design, Statistical, Statistics/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 593; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; CON: Equine Vet J. 2005 May;37(3):192-9. PMID: 15892225; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {189--191},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {Cooking} the books or simply getting the best out of the data? {Assessing} the nature of the relationship between variables},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Rollin, B. E.. “Ethics, evidence, and medicine.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2005. 978-983. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{rollin_ethics_2005,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Rollin, B. E.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {alternative medicine, animal health, Animal Health and Hygiene General, Animal Welfare, Attitudes, Education and Training, ethics, evidence based medicine, evidences, Health Services, homeopathy, Medicine, Pets and Companion Animals, professional ethics, Professions Practice and Service, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology, therapy, traditional medicine, veterinarians, veterinary education, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary science},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 492; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-19,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-8-12-January,-2005. 2005; 978-983; CF: Small animal and exotics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 19, Orlando, Florida, USA, 8-12 January, 2005.; RE: 9 ref.; SC: 2T; 0I; CA; HE; AG; VE; ZA; ZC; FT; FF},
    Pages = {978--983},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Ethics, evidence, and medicine},
    Url = {http://www.navc.org;},
    Volume = {19},
    Year = {2005},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.navc.org;}}
  • Roudebush, P., E. Logan, and F. A. Hale. “Evidence-based veterinary dentistry: a systematic review of homecare for prevention of periodontal disease in dogs and cats.” Journal of veterinary dentistry 22.1 (2005): 6-15. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_evidence-based_2005,
    Abstract = {Successful treatment and prevention of periodontal disease in pet animals requires a multidimensional approach to identify and eliminate exacerbating factors, provide scheduled professional examinations and care, and plan and implement a dental homecare program. Over the years, many therapeutic and preventive interventions have been developed or advocated for periodontal disease, but evidence of efficacy or effectiveness is highly variable. Accordingly, the main objective of this systematic review is to identify and critically appraise the evidence supporting various aspects of homecare for prevention of canine and feline periodontal disease.},
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Logan, E. and Hale, F. A.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Dentistry},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cat Diseases/prevention \& control, Cats, Dog Diseases/prevention \& control, Dogs, Evidence-Based Medicine, Oral Hygiene/veterinary, Periodontal Diseases/prevention \& control/veterinary, Preventive Dentistry},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {ID: 549; PUBM: Print; JID: 9426426; RF: 114; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {6--15},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary dentistry: a systematic review of homecare for prevention of periodontal disease in dogs and cats},
    Volume = {22},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Schulz, K. F.. “Clinical evidence notebook: Assessing allocation concealment and blinding in randomised controlled trials: why bother?.” Equine veterinary journal 37.5 (2005): 394-395. [Bibtex]
    @article{schulz_clinical_2005,
    Author = {Schulz, K. F.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Bias (Epidemiology), Double-Blind Method, Evidence-Based Medicine, Random Allocation, Randomized Controlled Trials/standards/veterinary, Research, Veterinary Medicine/standards/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {ID: 545; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {394--395},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {Assessing} allocation concealment and blinding in randomised controlled trials: why bother?},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Valverde, A., C. Gunkel, T. J. Doherty, S. Giguere, and A. S. Pollak. “Clinical evidence notebook: Effect of a constant rate infusion of lidocaine on the quality of recovery from sevoflurane or isoflurane general anaesthesia in horses.” Equine veterinary journal 37.6 (2005): 559-564. [Bibtex]
    @article{valverde_clinical_2005,
    Abstract = {REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Lidocaine constant rate infusions (CRIs) are common as an intraoperative adjunct to general anaesthesia, but their influence on quality of recovery has not been thoroughly determined. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of an intraoperative i.v. CRI of lidocaine on the quality of recovery from isoflurane or sevoflurane anaesthesia in horses undergoing various surgical procedures, using a modified recovery score system. HYPOTHESIS: The administration of intraoperative lidocaine CRI decreases the quality of recovery in horses. METHODS: Lidocaine (2 mg/kg bwt bolus followed by 50 microg/kg bwt/min) or saline was administered for the duration of surgery or until 30 mins before the end of surgery under isoflurane (n = 27) and sevoflurane (n = 27). RESULTS: Horses receiving lidocaine until the end of surgery had a significantly higher degree of ataxia and a tendency towards significance for a lower quality of recovery. There was no correlation between lidocaine plasma concentrations at recovery and the quality of recovery. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative CRI of lidocaine affects the degree of ataxia and may decrease the quality of recovery. POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: Discontinuing lidocaine CRI 30 mins before the end of surgery is recommended to reduce ataxia during the recovery period.},
    Author = {Valverde, A. and Gunkel, C. and Doherty, T. J. and Giguere, S. and Pollak, A. S.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {anesthesia, Anesthesia Recovery Period, anesthetics, Animals, General/methods/veterinary, Heart Rate/drug effects, Horses/physiology, Infusions, Inhalation/pharmacology, Intraoperative Care/veterinary, Intravenous/veterinary, Isoflurane/pharmacology, Lidocaine/pharmacology, Local/pharmacology, Methyl Ethers/pharmacology},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 599; LR: 20061115; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; 0 (Anesthetics, Inhalation); 0 (Anesthetics, Local); 0 (Methyl Ethers); 137-58-6 (Lidocaine); 26675-46-7 (Isoflurane); 28523-86-6 (sevoflurane); ppublish},
    Number = {6},
    Pages = {559--564},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {Effect} of a constant rate infusion of lidocaine on the quality of recovery from sevoflurane or isoflurane general anaesthesia in horses},
    Volume = {37},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Viner, B.. “Veterinary research and veterinary practice–bringing two worlds together.” Journal of small animal practice 46.9 (2005): 423-424. [Bibtex]
    @article{viner_veterinary_2005,
    Author = {Viner, B.},
    Journal = {Journal of Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Research, Veterinary Medicine/methods/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {ID: 544; PUBM: Print; JID: 0165053; CON: J Small Anim Pract. 2005 Sep;46(9):425-9. PMID: 16167592; CON: J Small Anim Pract. 2005 Sep;46(9):430-5. PMID: 16167593; CON: J Small Anim Pract. 2005 Sep;46(9):440-4. PMID: 16167595; CON: J Small Anim Pract. 2005 Sep;46(9):445-8. PMID: 16167596; ppublish},
    Number = {9},
    Pages = {423--424},
    Title = {Veterinary research and veterinary practice--bringing two worlds together},
    Volume = {46},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Viner, B.. “Clinical audit in veterinary practice – the story so far.” In practice 27.4 (2005): 215-218. [Bibtex]
    @article{viner_clinical_2005,
    Author = {Viner, B.},
    Journal = {In practice},
    Keywords = {auditing, monitoring, Professions Practice and Service, Veterinary Economics, veterinary practice, veterinary profession, veterinary services},
    Language = {English},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 628; RE: 10 ref.; SC: 0R; 0I; CA; AG; VE; ZA},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {215--218},
    Title = {Clinical audit in veterinary practice - the story so far},
    Volume = {27},
    Year = {2005}}
  • Viner, B. P. and C. S. Jenner. “Clinical audit–learning from the medical profession.” The veterinary record 157.22 (2005): 695-696. [Bibtex]
    @article{viner_clinical_2005-1,
    Author = {Viner, B. P. and Jenner, C. S.},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Great Britain, Humans, Medical Audit, Professional Practice/organization \& administration/standards, Veterinary Medicine/organization \& administration/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 627; PUBM: Print; JID: 0031164; ppublish},
    Number = {22},
    Pages = {695--696},
    Title = {Clinical audit--learning from the medical profession},
    Volume = {157},
    Year = {2005}}

2004

  • Cockcroft, P. and M. Holmes. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine. 2. Identifying information needs and finding the evidence.” In practice 26.2 (2004): 96-102. [Bibtex]
    @article{cockcroft_evidence-based_2004,
    Author = {Cockcroft, P. and Holmes, M.},
    Journal = {In practice},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {ID: 607},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {96--102},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine. 2. {Identifying} information needs and finding the evidence},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Cooper, J. E.. “Searching the literature.” The veterinary record 155.12 (2004): 375. [Bibtex]
    @article{cooper_searching_2004,
    Author = {Cooper, J. E.},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Peer Review, publications, Veterinary Medicine/standards/statistics \& numerical data},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {ID: 585; PUBM: Print; JID: 0031164; ppublish},
    Number = {12},
    Pages = {375},
    Title = {Searching the literature},
    Volume = {155},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Holmes, M. and P. Cockcroft. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine. 3. Appraising the evidence.” In practice 26.3 (2004): 154-164. [Bibtex]
    @article{holmes_evidence-based_2004,
    Author = {Holmes, M. and Cockcroft, P.},
    Journal = {In practice},
    Keywords = {diagnosis, knowledge, Pets and Companion Animals, Professions Practice and Service, Research, reviews, therapy, trials, veterinarians, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {English},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {ID: 600; RE: 6 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; ZA; VE},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {154--164},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine. 3. {Appraising} the evidence},
    Url = {Get it! Cornell http://resolver.library.cornell.edu/net/openurl/?sid=SP:CABI&id=pmid:&id=&issn=0263-841X&isbn=&volume=26&issue=3&spage=154&pages=154-164&date=2004&title=In%20Practice&atitle=Evidence-based%20veterinary%20medicine.%203.%20Appraising%20the%20evidence.&aulast=Holmes&pid=%3Cauthor%3EHolmes%2c%20M%3bCockcroft%2c%20P%3C%2Fauthor%3E%3CAN%3E20043046234%3C%2FAN%3E},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {2004},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {Get%20it!%20Cornell%20http://resolver.library.cornell.edu/net/openurl/?sid=SP:CABI&id=pmid:&id=&issn=0263-841X&isbn=&volume=26&issue=3&spage=154&pages=154-164&date=2004&title=In%20Practice&atitle=Evidence-based%20veterinary%20medicine.%203.%20Appraising%20the%20evidence.&aulast=Holmes&pid=%3Cauthor%3EHolmes%2c%20M%3bCockcroft%2c%20P%3C%2Fauthor%3E%3CAN%3E20043046234%3C%2FAN%3E}}
  • Holmes, M. and P. Cockcroft. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine 1. Why is it important and what skills are needed?.” In practice 26.1 (2004): 28-33. [Bibtex]
    @article{holmes_evidence-based_2004-1,
    Abstract = {This is the first part of a series of three articles on evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) - a discipline which increasingly is being recognised as having a fundamental role to play in day-to-day veterinary practice, as well as being vital to the future development of the profession. The article defines what EBVM is, explains its importance and describes the range of skills required to practise EBVM. Parts 2 and 3, which will be published in the February and March issues, respectively, will look in greater detail at first identifying information needs and searching for evidence, and then appraising the evidence.},
    Author = {Holmes, M. and Cockcroft, P.},
    Journal = {In practice},
    Keywords = {patient care, professional ethics, veterinarians, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice, veterinary profession, veterinary services ER},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 1343; PT: J},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {28--33},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine 1. {Why} is it important and what skills are needed?},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Innes, J. F.. “Nutraceuticals for osteoarthritis: what is the evidence?.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2004. 774-775. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{innes_nutraceuticals_2004,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Innes, J. F.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}. {Book} {I}: {Alternative} {Medicine} and {Orthopedics}},
    Keywords = {angiosperms, Animal Nutrition General, Animals, Animal Surgery and Non drug Therapy, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, chondroitin sulfate, Chordata, Curcuma, Curcuma longa, curcuminoids, disease prevention, Dogs, essential fatty acids, Fissipeda, glucosamine, joint diseases, mammals, monocotyledons, nutraceuticals, osteoarthritis, Pets and Companion Animals, plants, reviews, small mammals, Spermatophyta, treatment, turmeric, vertebrates, Zingiberaceae, Zingiberales},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 505; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Book-one:-Alternative-medicine-orthopedics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-18,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-17-21-January-2004. 2004; 774-775; CF: Small animal and exotics. Book one: Alternative medicine - orthopedics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 18, Orlando, Florida, USA, 17-21 January 2004.; RE: 11 ref.; RN: 9007-28-7; 3416-24-8; SC: 0N; 5C; 0I; CA; BE; VE; ZA; ZE},
    Pages = {774--775},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Nutraceuticals for osteoarthritis: what is the evidence?},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Innes, J. F.. “Best treatment for cruciate disease: what is the evidence?.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2004. 776-777. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{innes_best_2004,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Innes, J. F.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {Animals, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Chordata, diagnosis, Diagnosis of Animal Diseases, diagnostic techniques, Dogs, Fissipeda, joint diseases, ligaments, mammals, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, prognosis, reviews, small mammals, stifle, Surgery, surgical operations, treatment, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 506; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Book-one:-Alternative-medicine-orthopedics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-18,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-17-21-January-2004. 2004; 776-777; CF: Small animal and exotics. Book one: Alternative medicine - orthopedics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 18, Orlando, Florida, USA, 17-21 January 2004.; RE: 14 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA},
    Pages = {776--777},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Best treatment for cruciate disease: what is the evidence?},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Marks, S. L.. “Feline hepatic lipidosis: evidence-based therapy.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2004. 486. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{marks_feline_2004,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Marks, S. L.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {Animal Health and Hygiene General, Animals, Animal Surgery and Non drug Therapy, carnitine, carnivores, Cats, Chordata, digestive system diseases, disease control, Felidae, Felis, Fissipeda, lipid metabolism disorders, lipidosis, liver, liver diseases, mammals, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, prognosis, small mammals, therapeutic diets, therapy, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 503; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Book-one:-Alternative-medicine-orthopedics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-18,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-17-21-January-2004. 2004; 486; CF: Small animal and exotics. Book one: Alternative medicine - orthopedics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 18, Orlando, Florida, USA, 17-21 January 2004.; RE: 6 ref.; RN: 461-06-3; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA},
    Pages = {486},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Feline hepatic lipidosis: evidence-based therapy},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Mueller, R. S.. “Treatment protocols for demodicosis: an evidence-based review.” Veterinary dermatology 15.2 (2004): 75-89. [Bibtex]
    @article{mueller_treatment_2004,
    Abstract = {Publications discussing the treatment of demodicosis in the dog and cat are reviewed. Based on the evidence in the literature, amitraz rinses at 0.025-0.06\% every 7-14 days, and oral daily ivermectin at 300 micro g kg-1, milbemycin at 2 mg kg-1 and moxidectin at 400 micro g kg-1, respectively, can all be recommended for the treatment of generalized canine demodicosis. Ivermectin and moxidectin should be initiated at lower doses and patients monitored for possible adverse effects during therapy. In cats, 2\% lime sulfur dips and amitraz rinses at 0.0125-0.025\% have been used successfully..},
    Author = {Mueller, R. S.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Dermatology},
    Keywords = {Acari, amitraz, Animals, Arachnida, arthropods, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Cats, Chordata, Demodex, Demodicidae, demodicosis, disease control, Dogs, drug therapy, Felidae, Felis, Fissipeda, invertebrates, ivermectin, mammals, milbemycins, mites, moxidectin, Pesticides and Drugs Control, Pets and Companion Animals, pharmacology, Prostigmata, Protozoan Helminth Mollusc and Arthropod Parasites of Animals, reviews, small mammals, vertebrates},
    Language = {English; German; Spanish; French},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 507; AT: Special Issue: Therapeutics; RE: 138 ref.; RN: 33089-61-1; 70288-86-7; 113507-06-5; SC: 0J; 0I; 0V; CA; PA; VE; ZA; AA; XURL: E-MAIL; DOI; DIGITAL-OBJECT-IDENTIFIER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {75--89},
    Title = {Treatment protocols for demodicosis: an evidence-based review},
    Url = {rmueller@colostate.edu},
    Volume = {15},
    Year = {2004},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {rmueller@colostate.edu}}
  • Mulcahy, J.. “Erosion of scientific standards: where will it end?.” Australian veterinary journal 82.12 (2004): 755. [Bibtex]
    @article{mulcahy_erosion_2004,
    Author = {Mulcahy, J.},
    Journal = {Australian Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Complementary Therapies/ethics/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/ethics/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {ID: 564; LR: 20050609; PUBM: Print; JID: 0370616; CIN: Aust Vet J. 2005 Apr;83(4):198. PMID: 15907034; CIN: Aust Vet J. 2005 Apr;83(4):198. PMID: 15907033; ppublish},
    Number = {12},
    Pages = {755},
    Title = {Erosion of scientific standards: where will it end?},
    Volume = {82},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Potter, D.. “Evidence-based practice within the veterinary profession…” Veterinary times 34.5 (2004): 20. [Bibtex]
    @article{potter_evidence-based_2004,
    Author = {Potter, D.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Times},
    Keywords = {diagnosis, Diagnosis of Animal Diseases, Information and Documentation, Professions Practice and Service, reviews, veterinary practice, veterinary profession},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 510; RE: 6 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; ZA; VE; XURL: E-MAIL},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {20},
    Title = {Evidence-based practice within the veterinary profession..},
    Url = {d.potter@rcvs.org.uk},
    Volume = {34},
    Year = {2004},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {d.potter@rcvs.org.uk}}
  • Ramey, D. W.. “Finds evidence-based conclusions missing from study.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 225.9 (2004): 1332; author reply 1332–3. [Bibtex]
    @article{ramey_finds_2004,
    Author = {Ramey, D. W.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Case-Control Studies, Evidence-Based Medicine, Herpesviridae Infections/diagnosis/veterinary, Horse Diseases/diagnosis, horses, Patient Selection, Treatment Outcome},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 568; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; CON: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2004 Aug 15;225(4):554-9. PMID: 15344363; ppublish},
    Number = {9},
    Pages = {1332; author reply 1332--3},
    Title = {Finds evidence-based conclusions missing from study},
    Volume = {225},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Rosenthal, R. C.. “Evidence-based medicine concepts..” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 34.1 (2004): 1-6. [Bibtex]
    @article{rosenthal_evidence-based_2004,
    Abstract = {Today, the busy clinician will benefit from a philosophy of practice that brings together the best applicable evidence and the experiences of clinical work in an effort to provide the best care for individual patients. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) provides a structured approach that recognizes the contributions of both. An EBM practice will be efficient and effective in meeting the goal of assuring optimum care. The concepts of EBM make sense for veterinary medicine, even if there are limited numbers of randomized, blinded studies, and they can be applied by clinicians in all types of practice.},
    Author = {Rosenthal, R. C.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {clinical trials, experiments, small animal practice, veterinary medicine ER},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 1342; PT: J},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {1--6},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine concepts.},
    Volume = {34},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Roudebush, P., T. A. Allen, C. E. Dodd, and B. J. Novotny. “Timely topics in nutrition: application of evidence-based medicine to veterinary clinical nutrition..” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 224.11 (2004): 1766-1771. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_timely_2004,
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Allen, T. A. and Dodd, C. E. and Novotny, B. J.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animal diseases, animal nutrition, Cats, Decision Making, Dogs, nutritional support, pets, therapeutic diets, therapy, veterinary medicine},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {ID: 1340; PT: J BD: Felis; Felidae; Fissipeda; carnivores; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; small mammals; Canis; Canidae ER},
    Number = {11},
    Pages = {1766--1771},
    Title = {Timely topics in nutrition: application of evidence-based medicine to veterinary clinical nutrition.},
    Volume = {224},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Roudebush, P., T. A. Allen, C. E. Dodd, and B. J. Novotny. “Application of evidence-based medicine to veterinary clinical nutrition.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 224.11 (2004): 1765-1771. [Bibtex]
    @article{roudebush_application_2004,
    Author = {Roudebush, P. and Allen, T. A. and Dodd, C. E. and Novotny, B. J.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena, Animals, Clinical Competence, Dogs, Evidence-Based Medicine, Male, Research, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {LR: 20081121; JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {11},
    Pages = {1765--1771},
    Title = {Application of evidence-based medicine to veterinary clinical nutrition},
    Volume = {224},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Scrivani, P. V., N. L. Dykes, and H. N. Erb. “Clarifying some aspects of diagnostic-accuracy research.” Veterinary radiology & ultrasound : the official journal of the american college of veterinary radiology and the international veterinary radiology association 45.5 (2004): 419-423. [Bibtex]
    @article{scrivani_clarifying_2004,
    Abstract = {Evidence-based medicine is an approach to improved patient care that integrates clinical experience with basic science and clinical research in diagnostic accuracy, prognostic indicators, efficacy, and safety of treatments. Both clinical experience and methodical research assessments are essential components in this type of medical practice and underscore the importance of providing residents the opportunity to gain clinical experience as well as training them in how to perform, apply, and interpret clinical research in diagnostic imaging. The challenge for researchers is to design a study so that the data are valid and may be generalized to clinical situations where the test will be used. When assisting residents in the design of a research project for accuracy assessment of an imaging test, we consistently have observed three problem areas that if uncorrected would preclude the study results from being generalized to clinical situations where the test will be used: (1) understanding what is being measured, (2) appropriate selection of the sample population, and (3) the impact of the variability of the decision criterion. In this paper, we review these issues and suggest some solutions.},
    Author = {Scrivani, P. V. and Dykes, N. L. and Erb, H. N.},
    Journal = {Veterinary radiology \& ultrasound : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Radiology and the International Veterinary Radiology Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Patient Selection, Research Design, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 597; LR: 20061107; PUBM: Print; JID: 9209635; RF: 7; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {419--423},
    Title = {Clarifying some aspects of diagnostic-accuracy research},
    Volume = {45},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Thomson, J. U.. “The building blocks in the professional education process that lead to best practices and quality medicine.” Journal of veterinary medical education 31.1 (2004): 6-8. [Bibtex]
    @article{thomson_building_2004,
    Abstract = {It is time for the faculty of veterinary colleges to take responsibility for the veterinary curriculum, to move beyond the debate over teaching styles, and to understanding what a curriculum needs to accomplish. Our challenge is to engage students, faculty, and all veterinary professionals in evidence-based medicine and medical outcomes assessment and to identify best practices and continually improve the quality of veterinary health care. The education program of students must lay the foundation for this essential approach to veterinary practice.},
    Author = {Thomson, J. U.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Medical Education},
    Keywords = {Animals, Education, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Professional Practice, Total Quality Management, Veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Note = {ID: 548; PUBM: Print; JID: 7610519; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {6--8},
    Title = {The building blocks in the professional education process that lead to best practices and quality medicine},
    Volume = {31},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Twedt, D. C.. “Treatment of chronic hepatitis: evidence-based therapy.” Orlando, FL: Eastern States Veterinary Association, 2004. 487-489. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{twedt_treatment_2004,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Twedt, D. C.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {North} {American} {Veterinary} {Conference}: {Small} {Animal} and {Exotics}},
    Keywords = {adenosylmethionine, Animal Health and Hygiene General, Animals, Canidae, Canis, carnitine, carnivores, Chordata, colchicine, digestive system diseases, disease control, Dogs, Fissipeda, glucocorticoids, hepatitis, immunosuppressive agents, liver, liver diseases, liver function, mammals, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, silymarin, small mammals, therapy, ursodeoxycholic acid, vertebrates, Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology, vitamin E, zinc},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 504; SO: Small-animal-and-exotics-Book-one:-Alternative-medicine-orthopedics-Proceedings-of-the-North-American-Veterinary-Conference,-Volume-18,-Orlando,-Florida,-USA,-17-21-January-2004. 2004; 487-489; CF: Small animal and exotics. Book one: Alternative medicine - orthopedics. Proceedings of the North American Veterinary Conference, Volume 18, Orlando, Florida, USA, 17-21 January 2004.; RN: 29908-03-0; 461-06-3; 64-86-8; 128-13-2; 1406-18-4; 7440-66-6; SC: 5C; 0I; CA; VE; ZA},
    Pages = {487--489},
    Publisher = {Eastern States Veterinary Association},
    Title = {Treatment of chronic hepatitis: evidence-based therapy},
    Volume = {18},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Wilks, C. R.. “Critical reviews and evidence-based medicine.” Australian veterinary journal 82.11 (2004): 693-694. [Bibtex]
    @article{wilks_critical_2004,
    Author = {Wilks, C. R.},
    Journal = {Australian Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Review Literature, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 547; PUBM: Print; JID: 0370616; ppublish},
    Number = {11},
    Pages = {693--694},
    Title = {Critical reviews and evidence-based medicine},
    Volume = {82},
    Year = {2004}}
  • Wilson, J.. “Clinical evidence notebook: A dose of evidence-based medicine.” Journal of small animal practice 45.12 (2004): 642-643. [Bibtex]
    @article{wilson_clinical_2004,
    Author = {Wilson, J.},
    Journal = {Journal of Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Clinical Competence, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/methods/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {ID: 576; PUBM: Print; JID: 0165053; ppublish},
    Number = {12},
    Pages = {642--643},
    Title = {Clinical evidence notebook: {A} dose of evidence-based medicine},
    Volume = {45},
    Year = {2004}}

2003

  • Bladon, B. M. and J. P. M. Main. “Clinical evidence in the evaluation of presale radiography: are we in a desert on a horse with no name?.” Equine veterinary journal 35.4 (2003): 341-342. [Bibtex]
    @article{bladon_clinical_2003,
    Author = {Bladon, B. M. and Main, J. P. M.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Commerce, Extremities/anatomy \& histology/radiography, Hoof and Claw/anatomy \& histology/radiography, Horse Diseases/radiography, Horses/anatomy \& histology, Radiography/standards/veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {ID: 581; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; CON: Equine Vet J. 2003 Jun;35(4):350-3. PMID: 12880002; CON: Equine Vet J. 2003 Jun;35(4):354-65. PMID: 12880003; CON: Equine Vet J. 2003 Jun;35(4):366-74. PMID: 12880004; CON: Equine Vet J. 2003 Jun;35(4):375-81. PMID: 12880005; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {341--342},
    Title = {Clinical evidence in the evaluation of presale radiography: are we in a desert on a horse with no name?},
    Volume = {35},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Cockcroft, P. and M. Holmes. “Evidence-based cattle medicine: what is it? Why is it important? What skills do i need?.” Cattle practice 11.4 (2003): 373-384. [Bibtex]
    @article{cockcroft_evidence-based_2003,
    Author = {Cockcroft, P. and Holmes, M.},
    Journal = {Cattle Practice},
    Keywords = {cattle, veterinary medicine, veterinary services},
    Note = {ID: 1344; PT: J BD: Bos; Bovidae; ruminants; Artiodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {373--384},
    Title = {Evidence-based cattle medicine: what is it? {Why} is it important? {What} skills do i need?},
    Volume = {11},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Cockcroft, Peter D. and Mark A. Holmes. Handbook of evidence-based veterinary medicine. Oxford, UK ; Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2003. [Bibtex]
    @book{cockcroft_handbook_2003,
    Abstract = {This book is aimed at all veterinary surgeons (and veterinary students) wanting to know more about evidence based veterinary medicine (EBVM), particularly those in practice. It aims to help veterinarians practice EBVM and therefore improve the quality of care for their animal patients. EBVM is defined as "the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients" which means integrating clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research. The first chapter describes EBVM and compares it with traditional methods. It also provides several reasons for why veterinarians should practise EBVM and gives EBVM case studies. The second chapter covers the first step in EBVM, of translating clinical problems into questions that can be answered using information sources. The next chapter examines sources of information and includes a description of the 'hierarchy of evidence'. This hierarchy has stronger evidence at the top (systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials) and weaker evidence at the bottom (case reports, comparative studies, correspondence). Sources including databases, journals and books are evaluated. The next chapter describes methods of searching for information including searching of bibliographic databases. The fifth chapter covers the classification of research studies and where they stand in the hierarchy of evidence, and the sixth covers appraising evidence. The next 3 chapters cover diagnosis, Clinical Diagnostic Support Systems, and decision analysis, models and economics as evidence. The final chapter covers EBVM in education and future needs. The need for a central database of CATs (critically appraised topics) in veterinary medicine, similar to the Cochrane Collaboration in human medicine, is recommended..},
    Address = {Oxford, UK ; Malden, MA},
    Author = {Cockcroft, Peter D. and Holmes, Mark A.},
    Isbn = {1405108908 (alk. paper)},
    Keywords = {etc.Evidence-based medicine--Handbooks, etcVeterinary Medicine--HandbookEvidence-Based Medicine--Handbooks, manuals, Veterinary medicine--Handbooks},
    Note = {ID: 579; Includes bibliographical references (p. 201-203) and index.},
    Publisher = {Blackwell Publishing},
    Title = {Handbook of evidence-based veterinary medicine},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Cuk, A.. “Use of medical literature in clinical practice. I. Principles of evidence-based medicine..” Veterinarske novice 29.1 (2003): 13-20. [Bibtex]
    @article{cuk_use_2003,
    Author = {Cuk, A.},
    Journal = {Veterinarske Novice},
    Keywords = {literature, veterinary education, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice ER},
    Note = {ID: 1351; PT: J},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {13--20},
    Title = {Use of medical literature in clinical practice. {I}. {Principles} of evidence-based medicine.},
    Volume = {29},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Dohoo, I., W. Martin, and H. Stryhn. Veterinary epidemiologic research. Charlottetown, P.E.I, Canada: AVC Inc., 2003. [Bibtex]
    @book{dohoo_veterinary_2003,
    Address = {Charlottetown, P.E.I, Canada},
    Author = {Dohoo, I. and Martin, W. and Stryhn, H.},
    Note = {ID: 611},
    Publisher = {AVC Inc.},
    Title = {Veterinary epidemiologic research},
    Url = {http://www.upei.ca/ver},
    Year = {2003},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.upei.ca/ver}}
  • Doig, G. S.. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine: what it is, what it isn’t and how to do it.” Australian veterinary journal 81.7 (2003): 412-415. [Bibtex]
    @article{doig_evidence-based_2003,
    Author = {Doig, G. S.},
    Journal = {Australian Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {Education and Training, Professions Practice and Service, teaching methods, veterinary education, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jul,
    Note = {ID: 514; RE: 32 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; ZA; VE; XURL: E-MAIL},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {412--415},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine: what it is, what it isn't and how to do it},
    Url = {gdoig@med.usyd.edu.au},
    Volume = {81},
    Year = {2003},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {gdoig@med.usyd.edu.au}}
  • Mair, T. S. and N. D. Cohen. “A novel approach to epidemiological and evidence-based medicine studies in equine practice.” Equine veterinary journal 35.4 (2003): 339-340. [Bibtex]
    @article{mair_novel_2003,
    Author = {Mair, T. S. and Cohen, N. D.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, diagnosis, Differential, Epidemiologic Studies, Evidence-Based Medicine, Horse Diseases/diagnosis/drug therapy, horses, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/methods/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {ID: 556; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {339--340},
    Title = {A novel approach to epidemiological and evidence-based medicine studies in equine practice},
    Volume = {35},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Marr, C. M.. “Defining the clinically relevant questions that lead to the best evidence: what is evidence-based medicine?.” Equine veterinary journal 35.4 (2003): 333-336. [Bibtex]
    @article{marr_defining_2003,
    Author = {Marr, C. M.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {decision analysis, Decision Making, horses, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {ID: 1350; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {333--336},
    Title = {Defining the clinically relevant questions that lead to the best evidence: what is evidence-based medicine?},
    Volume = {35},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Marr, C. M., L. B. Jeffcott, T. S. Mair, and W. W. Muir. Evidence-based medicine: clinical evidence and the evolution of equine evidence-based medicine. Vol. 35. Newmarket, UK: Equine Veterinary Journal Ltd., 2003. [Bibtex]
    @book{marr_evidence-based_2003,
    Abstract = {This Equine Veterinary Journals is a special issue on the use of evidence-based medicine in veterinary medicine. It contains 18 articles, Which includes topics on epidemiology, radiology, surgery, drug therapy and arthroscopy. It presents evidence of clinical procedures, based on careful annotation of data, in areas that concern those performing their responsibilities to owners and the welfare of horses..},
    Author = {Marr, C. M. and Jeffcott, L. B. and Mair, T. S. and Muir, W. W.},
    Isbn = {0425-1644},
    Keywords = {Animals, Animal Surgery and Non drug Therapy, Animal Welfare, Chordata, decision analysis, Decision Making, diagnosis, Diagnosis of Animal Diseases, diagnostic techniques, drug therapy, epidemiology, Equidae, Equus, horses, mammals, Perissodactyla, radiography, Surgery, ungulates, vertebrates, veterinary medicine, Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology, veterinary practice},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 518; 35(4): 424 pp; AT: Special Issue: evidence-based medicine; SC: CA; BE; 0I; 0V; VE; ZA},
    Number = {4},
    Publisher = {Newmarket, UK: Equine Veterinary Journal Ltd.},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine: clinical evidence and the evolution of equine evidence-based medicine},
    Volume = {35},
    Year = {2003}}
  • McConnell, F.. “Evidence-based veterinary imaging considered.” Veterinary times 33.6 (2003): 12. [Bibtex]
    @article{mcconnell_evidence-based_2003,
    Author = {McConnell, F.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Times},
    Keywords = {Animals, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Cats, Chordata, diagnosis, Diagnosis of Animal Diseases, diagnostic techniques, Dogs, Felidae, Felis, Fissipeda, imagery, interpretation, mammals, Pets and Companion Animals, small mammals, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 520; RE: 4 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA},
    Number = {6},
    Pages = {12},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary imaging considered},
    Volume = {33},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Moriello, K. A.. “Introducing evidence based clinical reviews in Veterinary Dermatology.” Veterinary dermatology 14.3 (2003): 119-120. [Bibtex]
    @article{moriello_introducing_2003,
    Author = {Moriello, K. A.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Dermatology},
    Keywords = {Animals, Dermatology/standards, Evidence-Based Medicine, Meta-Analysis, Periodicals, Skin Diseases/drug therapy, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {ID: 562; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 9426187; CON: Vet Dermatol. 2003 Jun;14(3):121-46. PMID: 12791047; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {119--120},
    Title = {Introducing evidence based clinical reviews in {Veterinary} {Dermatology}},
    Volume = {14},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Muir, W. W.. “Is evidence-based medicine our only choice?.” Equine veterinary journal 35.4 (2003): 337-338. [Bibtex]
    @article{muir_is_2003,
    Author = {Muir, W. W.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {decision analysis, Decision Making, horses, veterinary medicine, veterinary practice},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {ID: 1349; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {337--338},
    Title = {Is evidence-based medicine our only choice?},
    Volume = {35},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Murphy, S. A.. “Research methodology search filters: are they effective for locating research for evidence-based veterinary medicine in PubMed?.” Journal of the medical library association : jmla 91.4 (2003): 484-489. [Bibtex]
    @article{murphy_research_2003,
    Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: The study examined the effectiveness of research methodology search filters developed by Haynes and colleagues and utilized by the Clinical Query feature of PubMed for locating literature for evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM). METHODS: A manual review of articles published in 6 commonly read veterinary journals was conducted. Articles were classified by format (original study, review, general article, conference report, decision analysis, and case report) and purpose category (etiology, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment). Search strategies listed in PubMed's Clinical Query feature were then tested and compared to the manually reviewed data to calculate sensitivity, specificity, and precision. RESULTS: The author manually reviewed 914 articles to identify 702 original studies. Search \#1 included terms determined to have the highest sensitivity and returned acceptable sensitivities over 75\% for diagnosis and treatment. Search \#2 included terms identified as providing the highest specificity and returned results with specificities over 75\% for etiology, prognosis, and treatment. DISCUSSION: The low precision for each search prompts the question: Are research methodology search filters practical for locating literature for the practice of EBVM? A study examining terms related to appropriate research methodologies for advanced clinical veterinary research is necessary to develop filters designed to locate literature for EBVM.},
    Author = {Murphy, S. A.},
    Journal = {Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA},
    Keywords = {Animals, Equipment Design, Evidence-Based Medicine/methods, Information Storage and Retrieval/methods, PubMed/instrumentation, Research, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 565; PUBM: Print; JID: 101132728; 2002/09/01 [received]; 2003/01/01 [accepted]; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {484--489},
    Title = {Research methodology search filters: are they effective for locating research for evidence-based veterinary medicine in {PubMed}?},
    Volume = {91},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Olivry, T., R. S. Mueller, and International-Task-Force-on-Canine-Atopic-Dermatitis. “Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of the pharmacotherapy of canine atopic dermatitis.” Veterinary dermatology 14.3 (2003): 121-146. [Bibtex]
    @article{olivry_evidence-based_2003,
    Abstract = {The efficacy of pharmacological interventions used to treat canine atopic dermatitis, excluding fatty acid supplementation and allergen-specific immunotherapy, was evaluated based on the systematic review of prospective clinical trials published between 1980 and 2002. Studies were compared with regard to design characteristics (randomization generation and concealment, masking, intention-to-treat analyses and quality of enrolment of study subjects), benefit (improvement in skin lesions or pruritus scores) and harm (type, severity and frequency of adverse drug events) of the various interventions. Meta-analysis of pooled results was not possible because of heterogeneity of the drugs evaluated. Forty trials enrolling 1607 dogs were identified. There is good evidence for recommending the use of oral glucocorticoids and cyclosporin for the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis, and fair evidence for using topical triamcinolone spray, topical tacrolimus lotion, oral pentoxifylline or oral misoprostol. Insufficient evidence is available for or against recommending the prescription of oral first- and second-generation type-1 histamine receptor antagonists, tricyclic antidepressants, cyproheptadine, aspirin, Chinese herbal therapy, an homeopathic complex remedy, ascorbic acid, AHR-13268, papaverine, immune-modulating antibiotics or tranilast and topical pramoxine or capsaicin. Finally, there is fair evidence against recommending the use of oral arofylline, leukotriene synthesis inhibitors and cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists..},
    Author = {Olivry, T. and Mueller, R. S. and {International-Task-Force-on-Canine-Atopic-Dermatitis}},
    Journal = {Veterinary Dermatology},
    Keywords = {Animals, antagonists, antibiotics, antihistaminics, ascorbic acid, aspirin, atopy, Canidae, Canis, capsaicin, carnivores, Chordata, ciclosporin, clinical trials, dermatitis, dermatology, disease control, Dogs, drugs, drug therapy, Fissipeda, glucocorticoids, herbal drugs, leukotrienes, mammals, misoprostol, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, phosphodiesterase I, promethazine, pruritus, Randomized Controlled Trials, reviews, skin lesions, small mammals, tacrolimus, triamcinolone, vertebrates, Veterinary Pharmacology and Anaesthesiology},
    Language = {English; French; Spanish; German},
    Note = {ID: 519; RE: 66 ref.; SC: 0V; 0I; CA; ZA; VE; 5C; AA; XURL: E-MAIL; DOI; DIGITAL-OBJECT-IDENTIFIER},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {121--146},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary dermatology: a systematic review of the pharmacotherapy of canine atopic dermatitis},
    Url = {Thierry_Olivry@ncsu.edu; %20International%20Task%20force%20on%20Canine%20Atopic%20Dermatitis%3C%2Fauthor%3E%3CAN%3E20033111855%3C%2FAN%3E},
    Volume = {14},
    Year = {2003},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {Thierry_Olivry@ncsu.edu;%20%20International%20Task%20force%20on%20Canine%20Atopic%20Dermatitis%3C%2Fauthor%3E%3CAN%3E20033111855%3C%2FAN%3E}}
  • Ramey, David W. and Bernard E. Rollin. Complementary and alternative veterinary medicine considered. 1 ed. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State Press, 2003. [Bibtex]
    @book{ramey_complementary_2003,
    Address = {Ames, Iowa},
    Author = {Ramey, David W. and Rollin, Bernard E.},
    Edition = {1},
    Isbn = {978-0-470-34489-7 0-470-34489-X},
    Keywords = {Alternative veterinary medicine},
    Note = {[electronic resource] / David W. Ramey and Bernard E. Rollin ; foreword by Franklin M. Loew.; Electronic reproduction. Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley InterScience, 2008. Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Web browser. Title from title screen (viewed on Mar. 27, 2008). Access may be restricted to users at subscribing institutions.; Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-243).},
    Publisher = {Iowa State Press},
    Title = {Complementary and alternative veterinary medicine considered},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Revington, M. L.. “Improving the reporting of clinical trials: the CONSORT statement.” Australian veterinary journal 81.9 (2003): 532-534. [Bibtex]
    @article{revington_improving_2003,
    Author = {Revington, M. L.},
    Journal = {Australian Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Publishing/standards, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/standards, Research/standards, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {LR: 20071115; JID: 0370616; ppublish},
    Number = {9},
    Pages = {532--534},
    Title = {Improving the reporting of clinical trials: the {CONSORT} statement},
    Volume = {81},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Robinson, N. G.. “Acupuncture needs evidence-based evaluation.” Veterinary practice news 15.5 (2003): 36-38. [Bibtex]
    @article{robinson_acupuncture_2003,
    Author = {Robinson, N. G.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Practice News},
    Keywords = {acupuncture, animal health, Animal Health and Hygiene General, Animal Surgery and Non drug Therapy, joint diseases, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Professions Practice and Service, veterinary practice},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 521; RE: 21 ref.; SC: 0I; CA; VE; ZA},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {36--38},
    Title = {Acupuncture needs evidence-based evaluation},
    Url = {Get it! Cornell http://resolver.library.cornell.edu/net/openurl/?sid=SP:CABI&id=pmid:&id=&issn=1528-6398&isbn=&volume=15&issue=5&spage=36&pages=36-38&date=2003&title=Veterinary%20Practice%20News&atitle=Acupuncture%20needs%20evidence-based%20evaluation.&aulast=Robinson&pid=%3Cauthor%3ERobinson%2c%20N%20G%3C%2Fauthor%3E%3CAN%3E20033083998%3C%2FAN%3E},
    Volume = {15},
    Year = {2003},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {Get%20it!%20Cornell%20http://resolver.library.cornell.edu/net/openurl/?sid=SP:CABI&id=pmid:&id=&issn=1528-6398&isbn=&volume=15&issue=5&spage=36&pages=36-38&date=2003&title=Veterinary%20Practice%20News&atitle=Acupuncture%20needs%20evidence-based%20evaluation.&aulast=Robinson&pid=%3Cauthor%3ERobinson%2c%20N%20G%3C%2Fauthor%3E%3CAN%3E20033083998%3C%2FAN%3E}}
  • Rossdale, P. D.. “Preface: Objectivity versus subjectivity in medical progress.” Equine veterinary journal 35.4 (2003): 331-332. [Bibtex]
    @article{rossdale_preface:_2003,
    Author = {Rossdale, P. D.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {ID: 608},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {331--332},
    Title = {Preface: {Objectivity} versus subjectivity in medical progress},
    Volume = {35},
    Year = {2003}}
  • Rossdale, P. D., L. B. Jeffcott, and M. A. Holmes. “Clinical evidence: an avenue to evidence-based medicine..” Equine veterinary journal 35.7 (2003): 634-635. [Bibtex]
    @article{rossdale_clinical_2003,
    Author = {Rossdale, P. D. and Jeffcott, L. B. and Holmes, M. A.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {clinical aspects, clinical trials, experimental design, horses, Research, veterinary medicine},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 1345; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {634--635},
    Title = {Clinical evidence: an avenue to evidence-based medicine.},
    Volume = {35},
    Year = {2003}}

2002

  • Kapatkin, A. S., P. D. Mayhew, and G. K. Smith. “Canine hip dysplasia: evidence-based treatment.” Compendium on continuing education for the practicing veterinarian 24.8 (2002): 590-599. [Bibtex]
    @article{kapatkin_canine_2002,
    Author = {Kapatkin, A. S. and Mayhew, P. D. and Smith, G. K.},
    Journal = {Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian},
    Keywords = {animal health, Animal Health and Hygiene General, Animals, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Chordata, Diagnosis of Animal Diseases, differential diagnosis, Dogs, exercise, Fissipeda, hip dysplasia, mammals, medical treatment, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, small mammals, therapeutic diets, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 523; RE: 54 ref.; SC: 0I; ZA; CA; HE; VE},
    Number = {8},
    Pages = {590--599},
    Title = {Canine hip dysplasia: evidence-based treatment},
    Volume = {24},
    Year = {2002}}
  • Mair, T. S.. “Contributions to an evidence-based medicine approach to colic surgery.” Equine veterinary journal 34.5 (2002): 428-429. [Bibtex]
    @article{mair_contributions_2002,
    Author = {Mair, T. S.},
    Journal = {Equine veterinary journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Colic/surgery/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Horse Diseases/surgery, horses, Treatment Outcome},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jul,
    Note = {ID: 557; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 0173320; CON: Equine Vet J. 2002 Jul;34(5):432-7. PMID: 12358043; CON: Equine Vet J. 2002 Jul;34(5):438-43. PMID: 12358044; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {428--429},
    Title = {Contributions to an evidence-based medicine approach to colic surgery},
    Volume = {34},
    Year = {2002}}
  • Milstein, M.. “Sees limitations of clinical reports.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 220.12 (2002): 1776; author reply 1776–7. [Bibtex]
    @article{milstein_sees_2002,
    Author = {Milstein, M.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Complementary Therapies/methods/standards, Evidence-Based Medicine, Randomized Controlled Trials/veterinary, Records/veterinary, Reproducibility of Results, Research/methods/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jun,
    Note = {ID: 561; LR: 20050427; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; CON: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2002 Apr 1;220(7):962; author reply 962-3. PMID: 12420766; ppublish},
    Number = {12},
    Pages = {1776; author reply 1776--7},
    Title = {Sees limitations of clinical reports},
    Volume = {220},
    Year = {2002}}
  • Murphy, S. A.. “Applying methodological search filters to CAB abstracts to identify research for evidence-based veterinary medicine.” Journal of the medical library association : jmla 90.4 (2002): 406-410. [Bibtex]
    @article{murphy_applying_2002,
    Abstract = {OBJECTIVE: The study sought to determine whether methodological search strategies identified by Haynes et al. as most effective for locating information for evidence-based medicine in MEDLINE would be effective in locating information in CAB Abstracts for evidence-based veterinary medicine. METHODS: Articles published in the year 2000 volumes of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association and Veterinary Record were manually examined and classified by format (original study, review, general article, conference report, decision analysis, case report) and purpose category (etiology, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment or prevention). Search strategies identified by Haynes et al. were then modified and run on the CAB Abstracts database. Sensitivity and specificity were determined by comparing results to the manual review of the literature. RESULTS: The author manually reviewed 390 articles, 289 articles of which were identified as original studies. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the search strategies were disappointing. DISCUSSION: The methodological search strategies developed by Haynes et al. for MEDLINE were not effective in locating literature for evidence-based veterinary practice in CAB Abstracts. A study examining methodological search strategies for identifying research for evidence-based veterinary practice in the CAB Abstracts database is necessary.},
    Author = {Murphy, S. A.},
    Journal = {Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA},
    Keywords = {Bibliographic, databases, Evidence-Based Medicine, Information Storage and Retrieval/methods, Sensitivity and Specificity, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 566; LR: 20061115; PUBM: Print; JID: 101132728; EIN: J Med Libr Assoc. 2003 Apr;91(2):275; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {406--410},
    Title = {Applying methodological search filters to {CAB} abstracts to identify research for evidence-based veterinary medicine},
    Volume = {90},
    Year = {2002}}
  • Nobis, N.. “Animal dissection and evidence-based life-science and health-professions education.” Journal of applied animal welfare science 5.2 (2002): 157-161. [Bibtex]
    @article{nobis_animal_2002,
    Author = {Nobis, N.},
    Journal = {Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science},
    Keywords = {Animal Welfare, dissection, postmortem examinations, reviews, veterinary education},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 524; RE: 23 ref.; SC: 0I; ZA; BE; CA; VE; XURL: E-MAIL; DOI; DIGITAL-OBJECT-IDENTIFIER},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {157--161},
    Title = {Animal dissection and evidence-based life-science and health-professions education},
    Url = {nobs@mail.rochester.edu},
    Volume = {5},
    Year = {2002},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {nobs@mail.rochester.edu}}
  • Pfeiffer, D. U.. Veterinary epidemiology: an introduction. 2002. [Bibtex]
    @book{pfeiffer_veterinary_2002,
    Author = {Pfeiffer, D. U.},
    Note = {ID: 615},
    Title = {Veterinary epidemiology: an introduction},
    Url = {http://www.vetschools.co.uk/EpiVetNet/epidivision/Pfeiffer/files/Epinotes.pdf},
    Year = {2002},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {http://www.vetschools.co.uk/EpiVetNet/epidivision/Pfeiffer/files/Epinotes.pdf}}
  • Pion, P. D.. Using Internet resources for making evidence-based treatment decisions. 2002. [Bibtex]
    @book{pion_using_2002,
    Author = {Pion, P. D.},
    Note = {ID: 886},
    Title = {Using {Internet} resources for making evidence-based treatment decisions},
    Year = {2002}}
  • Polzin, D.. “Treating feline renal failure: an evidence-based approach.” Dallas, TX: American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 2002. 585-590. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{polzin_treating_2002,
    Address = {Dallas, TX},
    Author = {Polzin, D.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. 20th annual meeting, {Veterinary} {Medical} {Forum}, {Dallas}, {TX}},
    Note = {ID: 880},
    Pages = {585--590},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Title = {Treating feline renal failure: an evidence-based approach},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {2002}}
  • Swift, R.. “Pleased to see clinical experience highlighted.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 220.7 (2002): 962; author reply 962–3. [Bibtex]
    @article{swift_pleased_2002,
    Author = {Swift, R.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Clinical Competence, Complementary Therapies/veterinary, Controlled Clinical Trials/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary Medicine/methods},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 575; LR: 20050428; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; CON: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2002 Jan 15;220(2):197-201, 183-4. PMID: 12126130; CIN: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2002 Jun 15;220(12):1776; author reply 1776-7. PMID: 12092945; ppublish},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {962; author reply 962--3},
    Title = {Pleased to see clinical experience highlighted},
    Volume = {220},
    Year = {2002}}
  • Tranquillo, V. M.. “Evidence based medicine..” Praxis veterinaria (milano) 23.2 (2002): 3-13. [Bibtex]
    @article{tranquillo_evidence_2002,
    Author = {Tranquillo, V. M.},
    Journal = {Praxis Veterinaria (Milano)},
    Keywords = {animal health, biostatistics, diagnosis, epidemiology, ER, methodology, theory, veterinary practice},
    Note = {ID: 1352; PT: J},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {3--13},
    Title = {Evidence based medicine.},
    Volume = {23},
    Year = {2002}}

2001

  • Bertone, J. J.. “More views on complementary and alternative medicine.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 218.6 (2001): 854-855. [Bibtex]
    @article{bertone_more_2001,
    Author = {Bertone, J. J.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Acupuncture Therapy/veterinary, Animals, Complementary Therapies/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Safety, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary Medicine/methods},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = mar,
    Note = {ID: 554; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; CON: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Feb 1;218(3):343-6. PMID: 11201557; ppublish},
    Number = {6},
    Pages = {854--855},
    Title = {More views on complementary and alternative medicine},
    Volume = {218},
    Year = {2001}}
  • Chesney, C. J.. “Systematic review of evidence for the prevalence of food sensitivity in dogs.” Veterinary record 148.14 (2001): 445-448. [Bibtex]
    @article{chesney_systematic_2001,
    Abstract = {Twelve papers giving original data on canine food sensitivity in an acceptable form were reviewed, and the disorder was confirmed in 390 dogs. Most of the papers did not give either the criteria by which dogs were included in a trial, or information about dogs which had undergone a trial with a restricted diet but in which food sensitivity had not been observed. Only one author indicated how the degree of pruritus of the dogs in the study was assessed. The question of owner compliance in conducting a diet trial was not considered in any of the papers. The best available evidence comes from three of the studies covering 534 dogs in total, of which 93 (17 per cent) suffered food sensitivity..},
    Author = {Chesney, C. J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Record},
    Keywords = {Animal Immunology, Animal Nutrition Physiology, Animals, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Chordata, clinical aspects, diets, Dogs, Fissipeda, food allergies, food sensitivity, mammals, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, pyoderma, reviews, skin diseases, skin tests, small mammals, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 526; RE: 26 ref.; SC: 0V; 0I; 0N; ZA; VE; CA; BE; ZE},
    Number = {14},
    Pages = {445--448},
    Title = {Systematic review of evidence for the prevalence of food sensitivity in dogs},
    Volume = {148},
    Year = {2001}}
  • Mair, T. S.. “Evidence-based medicine: can it be applied to equine clinical practice?.” Equine veterinary education 13.1 (2001): 2-3. [Bibtex]
    @article{mair_evidence-based_2001,
    Author = {Mair, T. S.},
    Journal = {Equine Veterinary Education},
    Keywords = {Evidence-Based Medicine, horse diseases, horses, veterinary education, veterinary medicine},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {ID: 1353; PT: J BD: Equus; Equidae; Perissodactyla; mammals; vertebrates; Chordata; animals; ungulates ER},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {2--3},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine: can it be applied to equine clinical practice?},
    Volume = {13},
    Year = {2001}}
  • Polzin, D. J., F. Jacob, S. Ross, and C. Osborne. “Canine chronic renal failure: where’s the evidence.” Denver, CO: American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 2001. 786-787. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{polzin_canine_2001,
    Address = {Denver, CO},
    Author = {Polzin, D. J. and Jacob, F. and Ross, S. and Osborne, C.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. 19th annual meeting, {Veterinary} {Medical} {Forum}, {Denver}, {CO}},
    Note = {ID: 881},
    Pages = {786--787},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Title = {Canine chronic renal failure: where's the evidence},
    Volume = {19},
    Year = {2001}}
  • Ramey, D. W.. “Look before you leap.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 17.2 (2001): 195-208. [Bibtex]
    @article{ramey_look_2001,
    Abstract = {Learning to critically evaluate therapeutic claims is vital to the success of the practicing veterinarian and the veterinary profession as a whole. Until such time as good scientific data in support of therapies are obtained, veterinarians should be careful in their advocacy and employment of new and unproved practices. They should also be aware of the many reasons why therapeutic "success" may be the result of a variety of factors unrelated to the treatment modality itself. Only by relying on rigorous standards of evidence can equine veterinarians prevent a return to the sincere but misguided ways of yesteryear.},
    Author = {Ramey, D. W.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Horse Diseases/therapy, horses, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 569; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511904; RF: 39; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {195--208},
    Title = {Look before you leap},
    Volume = {17},
    Year = {2001}}
  • Ramey, D. W. and B. E. Rollin. “Ethical aspects of proof and "alternative" therapies.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 218.3 (2001): 343-346. [Bibtex]
    @article{ramey_ethical_2001,
    Author = {Ramey, D. W. and Rollin, B. E.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Bioethics, Complementary Therapies/standards/veterinary, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {ID: 595; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; CIN: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Apr 1;218(7):1082-3; author reply 1083-4. PMID: 11318354; CIN: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Apr 1;218(7):1083; author reply 1083-4. PMID: 11318355; CIN: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Mar 15;218(6):853-4; author reply 855-6. PMID: 11294303; CIN: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Mar 15;218(6):854-5. PMID: 11294304; CIN: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Mar 15;218(6):854; author reply 855-6. PMID: 11294305; CIN: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Mar 15;218(6):855; author reply 855-6. PMID: 11294306; RF: 21; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {343--346},
    Title = {Ethical aspects of proof and "alternative" therapies},
    Volume = {218},
    Year = {2001}}
  • Roen, D. T.. “Another call for scientific evidence of alternative medicine.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 218.4 (2001): 505. [Bibtex]
    @article{roen_another_2001,
    Author = {Roen, D. T.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Complementary Therapies/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {ID: 570; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; CON: J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2000 Dec 15;217(12):1791. PMID: 11132878; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {505},
    Title = {Another call for scientific evidence of alternative medicine},
    Volume = {218},
    Year = {2001}}
  • Ross, C., K. K. Haussler, J. D. Kenney, D. Marks, J. J. Bertone, K. Henneman, and K. J. May. “Frontier medicine: the future and integrative medicine.” Veterinary clinics of north america: equine practice 17.2 (2001): 351-377. [Bibtex]
    @article{ross_frontier_2001,
    Abstract = {Vigorous and prolonged effort is required to gain true mastery of the healing arts. Conventional and complementary medicine have complementary strengths and weaknesses. Like the yin and yang of traditional Chinese medicine, they naturally flow into one another by a process of induction, creating balance. Integrative medicine is the frontier; it is the future. If we are to progress beyond our current understanding and ability to heal, we must work with theoretic models that allow us and our perception to operate "outside the box." For some, this understanding is intuitive. It is through cooperative and collaborative efforts of intuitively adept and technologically adept minds that we can integrate and advance our understanding; increase our ability to predict, prevent, and diagnose disease; and expand our therapeutic options.},
    Author = {Ross, C. and Haussler, K. K. and Kenney, J. D. and Marks, D. and Bertone, J. J. and Henneman, K. and May, K. J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Attitude to Health, Complementary Therapies/methods/standards/trends/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Forecasting, horses, Humans, Safety, Treatment Outcome, Veterinary Medicine/methods/standards/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 572; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8511904; RF: 68; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {351--377},
    Title = {Frontier medicine: the future and integrative medicine},
    Volume = {17},
    Year = {2001}}
  • Shaw, D.. “Veterinary medicine is science-based–an absolute or an option?.” The canadian veterinary journal.la revue veterinaire canadienne 42.5 (2001): 333-334. [Bibtex]
    @article{shaw_veterinary_2001,
    Author = {Shaw, D.},
    Journal = {The Canadian veterinary journal.La revue veterinaire canadienne},
    Keywords = {Animals, Clinical Competence, Complementary Therapies/veterinary, Evidence-Based Medicine, Humans, Randomized Controlled Trials/veterinary, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng; fre},
    Month = may,
    Note = {ID: 574; LR: 20041117; PUBM: Print; JID: 0004653; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {333--334},
    Title = {Veterinary medicine is science-based--an absolute or an option?},
    Volume = {42},
    Year = {2001}}

2000

  • Booth, A., T. Roper, and SCHARR. Evidence based veterinary medicine resources. 2000. [Bibtex]
    @book{booth_evidence_2000,
    Author = {Booth, A. and Roper, T. and {SCHARR}},
    Note = {ID: 885},
    Title = {Evidence based veterinary medicine resources},
    Year = {2000}}
  • Faragher, T.. “Animal welfare and scientific evidence.” Australian veterinary journal 78.11 (2000): 741. [Bibtex]
    @article{faragher_animal_2000,
    Author = {Faragher, T.},
    Journal = {Australian Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {Animal, Animals, Animal Welfare, Australia, Chickens, Evidence-Based Medicine, Female, Food Industry/standards, Foxes, Housing, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 589; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 0370616; ppublish},
    Number = {11},
    Pages = {741},
    Title = {Animal welfare and scientific evidence},
    Volume = {78},
    Year = {2000}}
  • Keene, B. W.. “Towards evidence-based veterinary medicine.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 14.2 (2000): 118-119. [Bibtex]
    @article{keene_towards_2000,
    Author = {Keene, B. W.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Keywords = {Animals, Controlled Clinical Trials, Evidence-Based Medicine/trends, Quality Control, Randomized Controlled Trials, Research Design, Veterinary Medicine/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 555; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 8708660; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {118--119},
    Title = {Towards evidence-based veterinary medicine},
    Volume = {14},
    Year = {2000}}
  • Polzin, D. J., E. Lund, P. Walter, and J. Klausner. “From journal to patient: evidence-based medicine.” Ed. Bonagura, J. D.. Vol. XIII. Kirk’s {Current}-veterinary-therapy-{XIII}: {Small} {Animal} {Practice}.. Philadephia: W.B. Saunders, 2000. 2-8. [Bibtex]
    @incollection{polzin_journal_2000,
    Address = {Philadephia},
    Author = {Polzin, D. J. and Lund, E. and Walter, P. and Klausner, J.},
    Editor = {Bonagura, J. D.},
    Isbn = {0-7216-5523-8},
    Keywords = {Animal diseases, bibliographies, databases, Information and Documentation, information retrieval, information systems, literature, Professions Practice and Service, treatment, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 529; SO: Kirk'-s-current-veterinary-therapy-XIII:-small-animal-practice. 2000; 2-8; RE: 13 ref.; SC: 0I; ZA; AG; VE; CA},
    Pages = {2--8},
    Publisher = {W.B. Saunders},
    Series = {Kirk's {Current}-veterinary-therapy-{XIII}: {Small} {Animal} {Practice}.},
    Title = {From journal to patient: evidence-based medicine},
    Volume = {XIII},
    Year = {2000}}
  • Rossdale, P. D., T. S. Mair, D. Collier, and C. W. McIlwraith. “Optimizing outcomes: the role of audit in medical and surgical practice.” Equine veterinary education 12.5 (2000): 226-231. [Bibtex]
    @article{rossdale_optimizing_2000,
    Author = {Rossdale, P. D. and Mair, T. S. and Collier, D. and McIlwraith, C. W.},
    Journal = {Equine Veterinary Education},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 882},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {226--231},
    Title = {Optimizing outcomes: the role of audit in medical and surgical practice},
    Volume = {12},
    Year = {2000}}
  • Smith, R. D.. “An evidence-based medicine approach to teaching veterinary epidemiology..” Eds. Salman, M. D., P. S. Morley, and R. Ruch-Gallie. Breckenridge, CO: International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 2000. ld 699. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{smith_evidence-based_2000,
    Address = {Breckenridge, CO},
    Author = {Smith, R. D.},
    Booktitle = {9th {Symposium} of the {International} {Society} for {Veterinary} {Epidemiology} and {Economics}},
    Editor = {Salman, M. D. and Morley, P. S. and Ruch-Gallie, R.},
    Keywords = {animal health, college curriculum, college students, educational methods, epidemiology, instruction, internet, Teaching, teaching methods, United States of America, veterinary colleges, veterinary education, veterinary medicine, veterinary schools},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1322; PT: B; CT: Proceedings of the 9th Symposium of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, Breckenridge, Colorado, USA, August 6-11 2000.; GE: Illinois; USA BD: East North Central States of USA; North Central States of USA; USA; North America; America; Developed Countries; OECD Countries; Corn Belt States of USA ER},
    Pages = {ld 699},
    Publisher = {International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics},
    Title = {An evidence-based medicine approach to teaching veterinary epidemiology.},
    Year = {2000}}

1998

  • Bogin, E. and N. D. Costa. “Potential and problems of animal models as sources of information for evidence-based practice.” Kimron Veterinary Institute, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University, Bet Dagan, Israel, 50250, Israel., 1998. 225-231. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bogin_potential_1998,
    Author = {Bogin, E. and Costa, N. D.},
    Isbn = {0314-1004},
    Keywords = {animal models, Animal Models of Human Nutrition, Animal Nutrition Physiology, Animals, Chordata, Hominidae, Homo, mammals, man, nutrition, Primates, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 530; CF: Twenty-second Annual Scientific Meeting, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, 29 November-2 December, 1998.; RE: 6 ref.; SC: 0X; ZA; 0U; HE; CA; BE; NU; ZD},
    Pages = {225--231},
    Publisher = {Kimron Veterinary Institute, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University, Bet Dagan, Israel, 50250, Israel.},
    Title = {Potential and problems of animal models as sources of information for evidence-based practice},
    Volume = {22},
    Year = {1998}}
  • Bonnett, B.. “Evidence-based medicine: critical evaluation of new and existing therapies.” Eds. Schoen, A. M. and S. G. Wynn. 1st ed. Complementary and alternative veterinary medicine: principles and practice. St. Louis: Mosby, 1998. 15-20. [Bibtex]
    @incollection{bonnett_evidence-based_1998,
    Address = {St. Louis},
    Author = {Bonnett, B.},
    Edition = {1st},
    Editor = {Schoen, A. M. and Wynn, S. G.},
    Isbn = {0-8151-7994-4},
    Note = {ID: 610},
    Pages = {15--20},
    Publisher = {Mosby},
    Series = {Complementary and alternative veterinary medicine: principles and practice},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine: critical evaluation of new and existing therapies},
    Year = {1998}}
  • Fogle, B.. “Evidence-based medicine.” The veterinary record 143.23 (1998): 643-644. [Bibtex]
    @article{fogle_evidence-based_1998,
    Author = {Fogle, B.},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Decision Making, Evidence-Based Medicine, Research Design, Veterinary Medicine/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {ID: 588; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 0031164; CON: Vet Rec. 1998 Nov 28;143(22):619. PMID: 9871961; ppublish},
    Number = {23},
    Pages = {643--644},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine},
    Volume = {143},
    Year = {1998}}
  • Lund, E. M., K. M. James, and J. D. Neaton. “Veterinary randomized clinical trial reporting: a review of the small animal literature.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 12.2 (1998): 57-60. [Bibtex]
    @article{lund_veterinary_1998,
    Abstract = {The randomized clinical trial (RCT) is a valuable research method for the evaluation of new treatment and prevention regimens in veterinary medicine. Reporting of clinical trials in other disciplines has not been complete. Without complete information on the conduct and results of a clinical trial, readers cannot optimize their use of the information presented. This report represents an objective review of randomized clinical trials in the veterinary small animal literature from 1986 to 1990. Results indicate that RCT reports in the small animal veterinary literature are incomplete. The importance of reporting on particular aspects of RCT research is described.},
    Author = {Lund, E. M. and James, K. M. and Neaton, J. D.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Keywords = {Animals, Bibliographic, databases, MEDLINE, Randomized Controlled Trials/veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = apr,
    Note = {ID: 592; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 8708660; RF: 20; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {57--60},
    Title = {Veterinary randomized clinical trial reporting: a review of the small animal literature},
    Volume = {12},
    Year = {1998}}
  • Malynicz, G.. “Evidence-based medicine.” The veterinary record 143.22 (1998): 619. [Bibtex]
    @article{malynicz_evidence-based_1998,
    Author = {Malynicz, G.},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 558; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 0031164; CIN: Vet Rec. 1998 Dec 5;143(23):643. PMID: 9881448; CIN: Vet Rec. 1998 Dec 5;143(23):644. PMID: 9881449; ppublish},
    Number = {22},
    Pages = {619},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine},
    Volume = {143},
    Year = {1998}}
  • Mosedale, P.. “Introducing clinical audit to veterinary practice.” In practice 20.1 (1998): 40-42. [Bibtex]
    @article{mosedale_introducing_1998,
    Author = {Mosedale, P.},
    Journal = {In practice},
    Keywords = {Animal Health and Hygiene General, auditing, veterinary practice, veterinary profession},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 629; RE: 3 ref.; SC: 0I; ZA; VE; CA},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {40--42},
    Title = {Introducing clinical audit to veterinary practice},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {1998}}
  • Roper, T.. “Evidence-based medicine.” The veterinary record 143.23 (1998): 644. [Bibtex]
    @article{roper_evidence-based_1998,
    Author = {Roper, T.},
    Journal = {The Veterinary record},
    Keywords = {Animals, Evidence-Based Medicine, Information Management, Information Services, Libraries, Medical, Veterinary Medicine/trends},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = dec,
    Note = {ID: 571; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 0031164; CON: Vet Rec. 1998 Nov 28;143(22):619. PMID: 9871961; ppublish},
    Number = {23},
    Pages = {644},
    Title = {Evidence-based medicine},
    Volume = {143},
    Year = {1998}}

1997

  • Bonnett, B. and C. Poland. “[Title unknown].” 1997. 143–end. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bonnett_[title_1997,
    Author = {Bonnett, B. and Poland, C.},
    Note = {ID: 616},
    Pages = {143--end},
    Title = {[{Title} unknown]},
    Year = {1997}}
  • Higgins, A. J.. “Randomized controlled trials–the problem of clinical trials in veterinary science.” Veterinary journal (london, england : 1997) 154.1 (1997): 1-3. [Bibtex]
    @article{higgins_randomized_1997,
    Author = {Higgins, A. J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary journal (London, England : 1997)},
    Keywords = {Animals, Clinical Trials/standards, Great Britain, Peer Review, Periodicals, Randomized Controlled Trials/standards, Research Design/standards, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jul,
    Note = {ID: 590; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 9706281; EIN: Vet J 1997 Sep;154(2):169; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {1--3},
    Title = {Randomized controlled trials--the problem of clinical trials in veterinary science},
    Volume = {154},
    Year = {1997}}

1996

  • Altman, D. G. and J. M. Bland. “Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence [statistical analysis of clinical trials].” Australian veterinary journal 74.4 (1996): 311. [Bibtex]
    @article{altman_absence_1996,
    Author = {Altman, D. G. and Bland, J. M.},
    Journal = {Australian Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {clinical trials, experiments, Mathematics and Statistics, methodology, statistical analysis, Techniques and Methodology},
    Language = {English},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 531; MS: previously published in the British Veterinary Journal, 311: 485 (1995); SC: CA; ZA; VE; 0I},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {311},
    Title = {Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence [statistical analysis of clinical trials]},
    Volume = {74},
    Year = {1996}}
  • Bonnett, B. and Reid R. Smith. “Critical appraisal meets clinical reality. Evaluating evidence in the literature using canine hemangiosarcoma as an example.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 26.1 (1996): 39-61. [Bibtex]
    @article{bonnett_critical_1996,
    Author = {Bonnett, B. and Smith, R. Reid},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, blood vessels, Canidae, Canis, carnivores, Chordata, Dogs, Fissipeda, Information and Documentation, information retrieval, literature, mammals, neoplasms, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Pets and Companion Animals, publications, reviews, secondary journals, therapy, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 532; RE: 53 ref.; SC: ZA; CA; VE; 0I; 7V; AG},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {39--61},
    Title = {Critical appraisal meets clinical reality. {Evaluating} evidence in the literature using canine hemangiosarcoma as an example},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {1996}}
  • Crow, S. E.. “Clinical trials in veterinary oncology: a clinician’s viewpoint.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 26.1 (1996): 29-37. [Bibtex]
    @article{crow_clinical_1996,
    Abstract = {Review of the veterinary oncology literature is important for keeping up-to-date, but it can be time-consuming and sometimes frustrating. Results of clinical trials are published in a variety of formats, including case descriptions, review articles, retrospective studies, and prospective trials. They may be found as abstracts, which usually present preliminary data and interpretation, as interesting items or commentary in a newsletter, or as articles in referred journals. In this "clinician's viewpoint," a practical approach to sifting through the mountains of literature is offered.},
    Author = {Crow, S. E.},
    Journal = {Veterinary clinics of North America: Small animal practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cats, Clinical Trials/standards/veterinary, Dogs, Medical Oncology/methods/standards, Neoplasms/veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 586; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7809942; RF: 18; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {29--37},
    Title = {Clinical trials in veterinary oncology: a clinician's viewpoint},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {1996}}
  • Polzin, D. J.. “Importance of clinical trials in evaluating therapy of renal diseases.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 26.6 (1996): 1519-1525. [Bibtex]
    @article{polzin_importance_1996,
    Abstract = {Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCCTs) provide the ultimate test of therapeutic effectiveness. In addition, results of properly performed RCCTs can provide data concerning the potential harmful effects and costs associated with treatments. This article addresses the need for RCCTs in veterinary nephrology and provides a background for applying the results of such studies to patients.},
    Author = {Polzin, D. J.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Animals, Cat Diseases/therapy, Cats, Clinical Trials/standards, Dog Diseases/therapy, Dogs, Kidney Diseases/therapy/veterinary, Randomized Controlled Trials/standards, Research},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = nov,
    Note = {ID: 594; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7809942; RF: 8; ppublish},
    Number = {6},
    Pages = {1519--1525},
    Title = {Importance of clinical trials in evaluating therapy of renal diseases},
    Volume = {26},
    Year = {1996}}

1995

  • Bonnett, B. N. and D. F. Kelton. “The diagnostic process: how do we do what we do and know what we know?.” Chicago, IL: American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1995. 235-237. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bonnett_diagnostic_1995,
    Address = {Chicago, IL},
    Author = {Bonnett, B. N. and Kelton, D. F.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {ACVS} {Veterinary} {Symposium}},
    Note = {ID: 871},
    Pages = {235--237},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Title = {The diagnostic process: how do we do what we do and know what we know?},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Bonnett, B. N. and D. F. Kelton. “Clinical trials: what is needed to move from clinical impression to critical proof?.” Chicago, IL: American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1995. 241-243. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bonnett_clinical_1995,
    Address = {Chicago, IL},
    Author = {Bonnett, B. N. and Kelton, D. F.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {ACVS} {Veterinary} {Symposium}},
    Note = {ID: 872},
    Pages = {241--243},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Title = {Clinical trials: what is needed to move from clinical impression to critical proof?},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Bonnett, B. N. and D. F. Kelton. “Evidence-based veterinary medicine: explaining the gaps between the literature and clinical reality.” Chicago, IL: American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1995. 247-249. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bonnett_evidence-based_1995,
    Address = {Chicago, IL},
    Author = {Bonnett, B. N. and Kelton, D. F.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {ACVS} {Veterinary} {Symposium}},
    Note = {ID: 873},
    Pages = {247--249},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Title = {Evidence-based veterinary medicine: explaining the gaps between the literature and clinical reality},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Bonnett, B. N. and D. F. Kelton. “Retrospective studies from medical records: treasure hunt or salvage operation?.” Chicago, IL: American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1995. 250-252. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bonnett_retrospective_1995,
    Address = {Chicago, IL},
    Author = {Bonnett, B. N. and Kelton, D. F.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {ACVS} {Veterinary} {Symposium}},
    Note = {ID: 874},
    Pages = {250--252},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Title = {Retrospective studies from medical records: treasure hunt or salvage operation?},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Boothe, D. M. and M. R. Slater. “Standards for veterinary clinical trials.” Advances in veterinary science and comparative medicine 39 (1995): 191-252. [Bibtex]
    @article{boothe_standards_1995,
    Author = {Boothe, D. M. and Slater, M. R.},
    Journal = {Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine},
    Keywords = {Animals, Animal Welfare, Clinical Trials/standards, Data Collection, Data Interpretation, Follow-Up Studies, Research Design/standards/statistics \& numerical data, Statistical, Veterinary Medicine/standards},
    Language = {eng},
    Note = {ID: 582; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 0216540; RF: 46; ppublish},
    Pages = {191--252},
    Title = {Standards for veterinary clinical trials},
    Volume = {39},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Kelton, D. F. and B. N. Bonnett. “Decision analysis: using what who don’t know to make better decisions.” Chicago, IL: American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1995. 256-258. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{kelton_decision_1995,
    Address = {Chicago, IL},
    Author = {Kelton, D. F. and Bonnett, B. N.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {ACVS} {Veterinary} {Symposium}},
    Note = {ID: 875},
    Pages = {256--258},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Title = {Decision analysis: using what who don't know to make better decisions},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Kelton, D. F. and B. N. Bonnett. “Diagnostic tests: the good, the useful and the not.” Chicago, IL: American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1995. 238-240. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{kelton_diagnostic_1995,
    Address = {Chicago, IL},
    Author = {Kelton, D. F. and Bonnett, B. N.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {ACVS} {Veterinary} {Symposium}},
    Note = {ID: 876},
    Pages = {238--240},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Title = {Diagnostic tests: the good, the useful and the not},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Kelton, D. F. and B. N. Bonnett. “Multi-center clinical trials: can the community practice provide those needed numbers?.” Chicago, IL: American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1995. 244-246. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{kelton_multi-center_1995,
    Address = {Chicago, IL},
    Author = {Kelton, D. F. and Bonnett, B. N.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {ACVS} {Veterinary} {Symposium}},
    Note = {ID: 877},
    Pages = {244--246},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Title = {Multi-center clinical trials: can the community practice provide those needed numbers?},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Kelton, D. F. and B. N. Bonnett. “Outcome and process evaluation: do you know you do more good than harm?.” Chicago, IL: American College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1995. 253-255. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{kelton_outcome_1995,
    Address = {Chicago, IL},
    Author = {Kelton, D. F. and Bonnett, B. N.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {ACVS} {Veterinary} {Symposium}},
    Note = {ID: 878},
    Pages = {253--255},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Title = {Outcome and process evaluation: do you know you do more good than harm?},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Klausner, J. S., E. M. Lund, D. J. Polzin, and P. A. Walter. “Bridging the gap: from paper to patient. Part 1: An introduction to evidence-based medicine and critical appraisal for the veterinary clinician.” Orlando, FL: American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 1995. 530-545. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{klausner_bridging_1995,
    Address = {Orlando, FL},
    Author = {Klausner, J. S. and Lund, E. M. and Polzin, D. J. and Walter, P. A.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. 13th annual meeting, {Veterinary} {Medical} {Forum}},
    Note = {ID: 879},
    Pages = {530--545},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Title = {Bridging the gap: from paper to patient. {Part} 1: {An} introduction to evidence-based medicine and critical appraisal for the veterinary clinician},
    Volume = {13},
    Year = {1995}}
  • Reeves, M. J. and N. P. Reeves. “Epidemiology and the veterinary oncologist–evaluation and critical appraisal of the scientific oncology literature: how to read the clinical literature.” Veterinary clinics of north america: small animal practice 25.1 (1995): 1-18. [Bibtex]
    @article{reeves_epidemiology_1995,
    Abstract = {Even in the most specialized areas of veterinary medicine, few clinicians or researchers can keep up with the volumes of scientific literature currently published. Faced with this onslaught, most clinicians would benefit from a systematic approach for selecting articles to read and evaluating their scientific merit.},
    Author = {Reeves, M. J. and Reeves, N. P.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice},
    Keywords = {Continuing/methods, Data Interpretation, Education, Epidemiology/education, Medical Oncology/education, Periodicals/standards, Reproducibility of Results, Research Design/standards, Statistical, Veterinary/methods},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 596; LR: 20051116; PUBM: Print; JID: 7809942; RF: 17; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {1--18},
    Title = {Epidemiology and the veterinary oncologist--evaluation and critical appraisal of the scientific oncology literature: how to read the clinical literature},
    Volume = {25},
    Year = {1995}}

1994

  • Bonnett, B. N.. “Clinical epidemiology: what does a positive test really mean?.” San Francisco, CA: American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 1994. 89-91. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bonnett_clinical_1994,
    Address = {San Francisco, CA},
    Author = {Bonnett, B. N.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. 12th annual meeting, {Veterinary} {Medical} {Forum}},
    Note = {ID: 868},
    Pages = {89--91},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Title = {Clinical epidemiology: what does a positive test really mean?},
    Volume = {12},
    Year = {1994}}
  • Bonnett, B. N.. “How can clinical epidemiology improve your diagnostic ability?.” San Francisco, CA: American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 1994. 86-88. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bonnett_how_1994,
    Address = {San Francisco, CA},
    Author = {Bonnett, B. N.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. 12th annual meeting, {Veterinary} {Medical} {Forum}},
    Note = {ID: 869},
    Pages = {86--88},
    Publisher = {American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Title = {How can clinical epidemiology improve your diagnostic ability?},
    Volume = {12},
    Year = {1994}}
  • Chanter, N. and J. L. N. Wood. “Guest editorial: Clinical observations and the veterinary clinical trial.” British veterinary journal 150.4 (1994): 307-309. [Bibtex]
    @article{chanter_guest_1994,
    Author = {Chanter, N. and Wood, J. L. N.},
    Journal = {British Veterinary Journal},
    Keywords = {Animals, Bias (Epidemiology), Double-Blind Method, Randomized Controlled Trials/veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 584; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 0372554; CON: Br Vet J. 1994 Jul-Aug;150(4):385-8. PMID: 8076172; ppublish},
    Number = {4},
    Pages = {307--309},
    Title = {Guest editorial: {Clinical} observations and the veterinary clinical trial},
    Volume = {150},
    Year = {1994}}
  • Lund, E. M., K. M. James, and J. D. Neaton. “Clinical trial design: veterinary perspectives.” Journal of veterinary internal medicine / american college of veterinary internal medicine 8.5 (1994): 317-322. [Bibtex]
    @article{lund_clinical_1994,
    Abstract = {Tremendous potential exists for the use of the randomized clinical trial (RCT) in veterinary clinical research. Understanding the fundamentals of RCT design not only benefits clinical researchers, but it can enhance the ability of practitioners to interpret published RCT reports. In this article, the essential components of RCT design and implementation are described using examples from clinical veterinary medicine.},
    Author = {Lund, E. M. and James, K. M. and Neaton, J. D.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine},
    Keywords = {Animals, Clinical Trials/veterinary, Randomized Controlled Trials/veterinary, Research Design, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 591; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 8708660; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {317--322},
    Title = {Clinical trial design: veterinary perspectives},
    Volume = {8},
    Year = {1994}}

1993

  • Paul, R. W. and R. B. Wilson. “Critical thinking: the key to veterinary educational reform.” Journal of veterinary medical education 20.2 (1993): 34-36. [Bibtex]
    @article{paul_critical_1993,
    Author = {Paul, R. W. and Wilson, R. B.},
    Journal = {Journal of Veterinary Medical Education},
    Keywords = {veterinary education, veterinary profession, veterinary schools},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 606; RE: 16 ref.; SC: CA; AG; VE; 0I; ZA},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {34--36},
    Title = {Critical thinking: the key to veterinary educational reform},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {1993}}

1991

  • Budsberg, S. C.. “The randomized clinical trial.” Veterinary surgery : vs : the official journal of the american college of veterinary surgeons 20.5 (1991): 326-328. [Bibtex]
    @article{budsberg_randomized_1991,
    Abstract = {Randomized clinical trials were developed to eliminate biases inherent in clinical medicine. Six types of bias that can occur during patient selection and treatment allocation and in the collection and analysis of the data have been identified. A variation of the prospective randomized clinical trial, the nonrandomized surgeon design, overcomes biases specific to surgical investigations.},
    Author = {Budsberg, S. C.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Surgery : VS : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons},
    Keywords = {Animals, Bias (Epidemiology), Observer Variation, Randomized Controlled Trials/veterinary},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 583; LR: 20061107; PUBM: Print; JID: 8113214; RF: 14; ppublish},
    Number = {5},
    Pages = {326--328},
    Title = {The randomized clinical trial},
    Volume = {20},
    Year = {1991}}
  • Salman, M. D., C. R. Curtis, and S. Shott. “Statistics simplified. Comparing means.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 198.1 (1991): 62-65. [Bibtex]
    @article{salman_statistics_1991,
    Author = {Salman, M. D. and Curtis, C. R. and Shott, S.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Analysis of Variance, Animals, Software, Statistics as Topic, Veterinary Medicine/statistics \& numerical data},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jan,
    Note = {ID: 1357; LR: 20071115; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {62--65},
    Title = {Statistics simplified. {Comparing} means},
    Volume = {198},
    Year = {1991}}

1990

  • Bonnett, B. N.. “Interpretation of diagnostic tests: skills for practice and research.” Toronto, Canada: Society for Theriogenology, 1990. 10-23. [Bibtex]
    @inproceedings{bonnett_interpretation_1990,
    Address = {Toronto, Canada},
    Author = {Bonnett, B. N.},
    Booktitle = {Proceedings. {Annual} {Meeting}, {Society} for {Theriogenology}},
    Note = {ID: 870},
    Pages = {10--23},
    Publisher = {Society for Theriogenology},
    Title = {Interpretation of diagnostic tests: skills for practice and research},
    Year = {1990}}
  • Curtis, C. R., M. D. Salman, and S. Shott. “Power and sample size.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 197.7 (1990): 838-840. [Bibtex]
    @article{curtis_power_1990,
    Author = {Curtis, C. R. and Salman, M. D. and Shott, S.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Probability, Statistics as Topic},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 1358; LR: 20071115; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {838--840},
    Title = {Power and sample size},
    Volume = {197},
    Year = {1990}}
  • Curtis, C. R., M. D. Salman, and S. Shott. “P values.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 197.3 (1990): 318-320. [Bibtex]
    @article{curtis_p_1990,
    Author = {Curtis, C. R. and Salman, M. D. and Shott, S.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Animals, Probability},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 1360; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {3},
    Pages = {318--320},
    Title = {P values},
    Volume = {197},
    Year = {1990}}
  • Salman, M. D., C. R. Curtis, and S. Shott. “Statistics simplified. Data description.” Journal of the american veterinary medical association 197.1 (1990): 36-38. [Bibtex]
    @article{salman_statistics_1990,
    Author = {Salman, M. D. and Curtis, C. R. and Shott, S.},
    Journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association},
    Keywords = {Agriculture, Statistics as Topic, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = jul,
    Note = {ID: 1359; LR: 20071115; PUBM: Print; JID: 7503067; ppublish},
    Number = {1},
    Pages = {36--38},
    Title = {Statistics simplified. {Data} description},
    Volume = {197},
    Year = {1990}}

1988

  • Smith, R. D.. “Veterinary clinical research: a survey of epidemiologic study designs and clinical issues appearing in a practice journal.” Acta veterinaria scandinavica.supplementum 84 (1988): 504-506. [Bibtex]
    @article{smith_veterinary_1988,
    Author = {Smith, R. D.},
    Journal = {Acta veterinaria Scandinavica.Supplementum},
    Keywords = {Animals, Epidemiologic Methods/veterinary, Periodicals, Research Design, veterinary medicine},
    Language = {eng},
    Note = {ID: 598; LR: 20031114; PUBM: Print; JID: 0061331; ppublish},
    Pages = {504--506},
    Title = {Veterinary clinical research: a survey of epidemiologic study designs and clinical issues appearing in a practice journal},
    Volume = {84},
    Year = {1988}}

1987

  • Curtis, C. R., H. N. Erb, and J. M. Kranz. “An introduction to the use of epidemiologic research methods in dairy science.” Journal of dairy science 70.2 (1987): 373-380. [Bibtex]
    @article{curtis_introduction_1987,
    Abstract = {Many dairy scientists are not familiar with epidemiologic study designs and measures. The various designs (cross-sectional, case-control, cohort) are reviewed with special reference to their strengths and weaknesses. Epidemiologic measures (incidence and prevalence rates, relative risk, odds ratio, attributable fraction, and population attributable fraction) are defined, and their validity in the contexts of the different study designs is discussed. Incidence rate (risk of disease) is the number of new cases of a disease divided by the population at risk during a specified time period. Prevalence rate is the frequency of both new and old cases in a population at a specified point or period in time divided by the average population during that same period. Both incidence and duration of disease contribute to prevalence. Odds ratios and relative risks are measures of association (how much disease the exposed group experienced relative to the nonexposed group) and are used to assess the relative importance of risk factors. Attributable fraction is the proportion of the incidence in the exposed group that can be attributed to the specific exposure. Population attributuable fraction is the expected reduction in incidence in the whole population if the specific exposure were prevented. The attributable fractions are useful in planning preventive and herd health programs.},
    Author = {Curtis, C. R. and Erb, H. N. and Kranz, J. M.},
    Journal = {Journal of Dairy Science},
    Keywords = {Animals, cattle, Dairying/methods, Epidemiologic Methods/veterinary, Female, Research Design},
    Language = {eng},
    Month = feb,
    Note = {LR: 20061115; JID: 2985126R; ppublish},
    Number = {2},
    Pages = {373--380},
    Title = {An introduction to the use of epidemiologic research methods in dairy science},
    Volume = {70},
    Year = {1987}}

1985

  • Dohoo, I. R. and Waltner D. Toews. “Interpreting clinical research. II. Descriptive and experimental studies.” Compendium on continuing education for the practicing veterinarian 7.9 (1985): S513–S516,S518,S520. [Bibtex]
    @article{dohoo_interpreting_1985,
    Author = {Dohoo, I. R. and Toews, D. Waltner},
    Journal = {Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian},
    Keywords = {Animal experiments, Animal Health and Hygiene General, Research},
    Language = {English},
    Month = sep,
    Note = {ID: 603; RE: 10 ref.; SC: ZA; CA; VE; 0I},
    Number = {9},
    Pages = {S513--S516,S518,S520},
    Title = {Interpreting clinical research. {II}. {Descriptive} and experimental studies},
    Volume = {7},
    Year = {1985}}
  • Dohoo, I. R. and Waltner D. Toews. “Interpreting clinical research. III. Observational studies and interpretation of results.” Compendium on continuing education for the practicing veterinarian 7.10 (1985): S605–S610, S612,S616. [Bibtex]
    @article{dohoo_interpreting_1985-1,
    Author = {Dohoo, I. R. and Toews, D. Waltner},
    Journal = {Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian},
    Keywords = {Animal diseases, Animal Health and Hygiene General, Epidemiological surveys, statistical analysis},
    Language = {English},
    Month = oct,
    Note = {ID: 604; RE: 20 ref.; SC: ZA; CA; VE; 0I},
    Number = {10},
    Pages = {S605--S610, S612,S616},
    Title = {Interpreting clinical research. {III}. {Observational} studies and interpretation of results},
    Volume = {7},
    Year = {1985}}
  • Dohoo, I. R. and Waltner D. Toews. “Interpreting clinical research. I. General considerations.” Compendium on continuing education for the practicing veterinarian 7.8 (1985): S473–S478. [Bibtex]
    @article{dohoo_interpreting_1985-2,
    Author = {Dohoo, I. R. and Toews, D. Waltner},
    Journal = {Compendium on Continuing Education for the Practicing Veterinarian},
    Keywords = {Animal Health and Hygiene General, Research},
    Language = {English},
    Month = aug,
    Note = {ID: 605; RE: 14 ref.; SC: ZA; CA; VE; 0I},
    Number = {8},
    Pages = {S473--S478},
    Title = {Interpreting clinical research. {I}. {General} considerations},
    Volume = {7},
    Year = {1985}}

1981

  • Hathaway, R. H.. “Treatment of colic in horses based on empirical evidence.” Veterinary medicine and small animal clinician 76.7 (1981): 1019-1020. [Bibtex]
    @article{hathaway_treatment_1981,
    Author = {Hathaway, R. H.},
    Journal = {Veterinary Medicine and Small Animal Clinician},
    Keywords = {Animals, Chordata, colic, drug therapy, Equidae, Equus, horse diseases, horses, mammals, Non communicable Diseases and Injuries of Animals, Perissodactyla, reviews, ungulates, vertebrates},
    Language = {English},
    Note = {ID: 533; RE: 1 ref.; SC: ZA; CA; VE; 0I},
    Number = {7},
    Pages = {1019--1020},
    Title = {Treatment of colic in horses based on empirical evidence},
    Volume = {76},
    Year = {1981}}
  • Gay, J.. Clinical epidemiology & evidence-based medicine glossary. . [Bibtex]
    @book{gay_clinical_????,
    Author = {Gay, J.},
    Title = {Clinical epidemiology \& evidence-based medicine glossary}}
  • Gay, J.. Guidelines for assessing professional information. . [Bibtex]
    @book{gay_guidelines_????,
    Author = {Gay, J.},
    Title = {Guidelines for assessing professional information}}
  • Gay, John. WWWeb Epidemiology & Evidence-based Medicine Sources for Veterinarians, version 3.6. . [Bibtex]
    @book{gay_wwweb_????,
    Author = {Gay, John},
    Note = {ID: 887},
    Title = {{WWWeb} {Epidemiology} \& {Evidence}-based {Medicine} {Sources} for {Veterinarians}, version 3.6}}
  • Smith, Ronald Dee. Veterinary clinical epidemiology. 3rd ed. ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC/Taylor & Francis, 2006., . [Bibtex]
    @book{smith_veterinary_????,
    Abstract = {Defining the limits of normality -- Evaluation of diagnostic tests -- Use of diagnostic tests -- Measuring the commonness of disease -- Risk assessment and prevention -- Measuring and communicating prognoses -- Design and evaluation of clinical trials -- Statistical significance -- Medical ecology and outbreak investigation -- Measuring and expressing occurrence -- Establishing cause -- Source and transmission of disease agents -- The cost of disease.},
    Address = {Boca Raton, FL},
    Author = {Smith, Ronald Dee},
    Edition = {3rd ed.},
    Isbn = {0849315662 (hardcover : acid-free paper)0824702749780849315664},
    Keywords = {Veterinary clinical epidemiology.Epidemiologic Methods--veterinary.},
    Note = {ID: 580; Includes bibliographical references (p. 243-249) and index.},
    Publisher = {CRC/Taylor \& Francis, 2006.},
    Title = {Veterinary clinical epidemiology},
    Url = {Catalog Record - http://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5701735&DB=local},
    Bdsk-Url-1 = {Catalog%20Record%20-%20http://catalog.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=5701735&DB=local}}